Language at school embraces culture

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The city of Albuquerque, New Mexico is rich in Native American, Mexican and Spanish culture. Most of the culture is the language. Throughout New Mexico’s history, speaking Spanish was hated. It is now accepted by bilingual education. “This gives us as a school system a rigorous opportunity to take part of our history back to our students,” said Antonio Gonzalez, vice-principal and former bilingual teacher. Jessica Villalovos, Director of APS Language and Equity, said: “Our identity is very beautiful. In Villalobos, more and more students are graduating with bilingual seals over the past four years. “On average, about 200 to 300 students received bilingual sales. On average, they expanded to 1,300 seals. Awarded in the past two years, ”he said. Obtaining a bilingual seal is a motivation for obtaining the diploma. “Probably the unintended consequences of belonging and asserting a bilingual program, but that’s a better sign of its success than seeing kids graduate because of it,” Gonzales said. “It’s amazing to see students not only learning a language in a relatively short period of time, but also outperforming, for example, their classmates in one language and standardized assessments,” Gonzales said. to augment. It’s also a message when you graduate from high school. “Dosidiomasvale pordospersonas. Knowing two languages ​​will allow us to make a double contribution to the world. I think it’s a great story, ”says Gonzales. Of the 144 APS schools, 66 have bilingual programs in Spanish, Zuni and Dene. Watch the video above for the full text.

The city of Albuquerque, New Mexico is rich in Native American, Mexican and Spanish culture. Most of the culture is the language.

Speaking Spanish has been hated throughout New Mexico’s history. Now it is accepted Bilingual education..

“This is a rigorous way for us as a school system to give our students the opportunity to rediscover part of their history,” said Antonio Gonzalez, assistant superintendent and former bilingual teacher. “”

Learning a language also involves a part of identity.

“Maintaining and maintaining the language is very important so that it does not get lost,” said Jessica Villalovos, APS Director of Language and Equity. “It’s very beautiful in our identity.

Villalobos has seen more students graduate with bilingual seals over the past four years.

“On average, about 200 to 300 students received bilingual sales. Over the past two years, an average of 1,300 seals have been awarded, ”Villalobos said.

Obtaining a bilingual seal is a motivation for obtaining the diploma.

“Probably the unintended consequences of belonging and asserting a bilingual program, but that’s a better sign of its success than seeing kids graduate because of it,” Gonzales said.

Learning a new language is something that some people learn English and others learn Spanish.

“It’s amazing to see students not only learning a language in a relatively short period of time, but also outperforming their unilingual classmates and standardized assessments, for example,” Gonzales said. ..

It’s also a message when you graduate from high school.

“Dosidiomasvale pordospersonas. Knowing two languages ​​will allow us to make a double contribution to the world. I think it’s a really great story, ”says Gonzales.

Of the 144 APS schools, 66 have bilingual programs in Spanish, Zuni and Dene.

Watch the video above for more information.

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