Spanish schools – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 22:56:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gicarg.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-105x105.png Spanish schools – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ 32 32 The Edmonds Company helps organizations bridge communication gaps with multicultural audiences https://gicarg.org/the-edmonds-company-helps-organizations-bridge-communication-gaps-with-multicultural-audiences/ Tue, 17 May 2022 21:51:52 +0000 https://gicarg.org/the-edmonds-company-helps-organizations-bridge-communication-gaps-with-multicultural-audiences/ Amalia Martino Since founding The Vida Agency nearly five years ago, Edmonds resident Amalia Martino has been on a mission to change the way organizations communicate with their increasingly diverse audiences. His strategic communications firm, which moved its headquarters from Seattle to downtown Edmonds earlier this year, is committed to closing the communication gaps that […]]]>
Amalia Martino

Since founding The Vida Agency nearly five years ago, Edmonds resident Amalia Martino has been on a mission to change the way organizations communicate with their increasingly diverse audiences.

His strategic communications firm, which moved its headquarters from Seattle to downtown Edmonds earlier this year, is committed to closing the communication gaps that often exist between organizations and their constituents, especially when these audiences are multicultural and multilingual.

Martino’s business primarily focuses on assisting public agencies and nonprofits, from the City of Seattle to Cascadia College to AARP, but she has also developed campaigns for the private sector. (Check out this work for Everett Mall, which focuses on showcasing local students each year for its back-to-school advertising.)

The agency’s Spanish-language ad for Community Health Plan of Washington won a Northwest Regional Emmy.

Regardless of the client, the goal is the same: to develop communications strategies that “are intentional from the start” to engage more diverse audiences, Martino said.

Martino, 46, who describes herself as mixed race, is no stranger to diversity issues. The daughter of a single mother, she grew up on Seattle’s Capitol Hill and was among the first students to participate in Seattle’s school bus program, which took her to majority-white schools north of the Ship Canal. . She graduated from Roosevelt High School and the University of Washington, with dreams of becoming an international diplomat.

“I grew up as the only brown person in a really white family,” she recalls. When working with clients, Martino said she not only brings that experience, but also what she describes as “a Northwest sensibility. When it comes to race and multiculturalism, languages, it’s an easier conversation to have in New York than in Seattle, in the Northwest. Seattle has its own way of doing things when it comes to racing.

As a child and teenager, Martino also starred in stage productions and commercials. Before heading to a post-graduate study abroad program in Mexico in the late 1990s, she appeared in a national advertisement for Microsoft, which funded much of her living expenses at the foreign.

“I came back (from Mexico) and said, ‘I’m going to be an actress and go to Los Angeles,'” Martino said. Passions “but it wasn’t really for me,” she says.

She moved to the San Francisco Bay Area, where she was hired at the Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Policy. Starting as an administrative assistant, she was promoted to communications coordinator, then worked for Kaiser Permanente International, interacting with healthcare leaders around the world. During this time, she also gave birth to her daughter, Sophia.

Amalia Martino with her mother Theresa Norris outside the Vida agency headquarters in Edmonds town centre. (Photo courtesy of Runta News)

In 2007, when her daughter was ready to start kindergarten, Martino decided to move back to Washington State, where she had family. Her mother, Theresa Norris, invited her to move into a house in Edmonds that Norris and her sister had recently purchased as an investment. (Norris now lives in Edmonds and also serves as an accountant at the Vida agency.)

Martino moved into the Yost Park residence, which she eventually purchased. Working in freelance communications from home, “I joined the PTA and spent time as a soccer mom,” she said. (Sophia, who graduated from Edmonds-Woodway High School and is now a student, played football for the Warriors.)

As her daughter grew, “the more freedom I had as a single mom to really think about what was in store for me and that really helped me get out of freelancing and think about making some business,” Martino said. “And here we are – almost five years.”

What motivated Martino to create The Vida Agency? She pointed to her past work in other American cities — far more culturally diverse than Seattle — and the realization that the Seattle area, too, is “growing and changing.”

As the region becomes increasingly multicultural, many organizations have good intentions when trying to communicate, she explained. But often their efforts to reach diverse audiences are “an afterthought — we’ll do it (the communications) in English and then we’ll translate it,” she said.

The problem with this approach? “There’s not really any quality control in this translation,” Martino said. “If your intention is to make a bilingual campaign, then you start with that intention from the beginning. That’s the approach we really take in our work, and I think it’s the approach that works best.

“We’re not just talking about language translation,” she continued. “We’re talking, how can we do a creative campaign that says the same thing in English as it does in other languages ​​and has the same look, feel and feeling that you’re trying to convey?”

This means involving what Martino described as “community partners and language partners” who are involved in creating the campaign from the start, ensuring that any strategic communications effort effectively reaches its target audience.

Amalia Martino participates in a public awareness event related to Vida Agency’s Be Ready. Campaign Be hydrated.

As an example, she cited the “Be Prepared, Be Hydrated” campaign that agency Vida created for the city of Seattle. It was a multicultural marketing effort to reduce youth demand for sugary drinks and promote the value of drinking water.

Instead of simply translating a campaign into English, the agency engaged a community coalition of organizations and young people to develop a bilingual English/Spanish communications approach.

Martino recalled that those working on the campaign started with three or four concepts but quickly eliminated two because “some were a pun that just wasn’t going to work in Spanish” and also “included slang that in some parts of Mexico was probably not good for extinguishing.

The campaign won a President’s Choice Award from the Puget Sound Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America.

Vida Agency works with a Lynnwood-based company, Andromeda, which provides interpreting and translation services in over 20 languages. The difference between Andromeda and other translation language service companies, Martino said, is that those who work there engage in a process known as “transcreation.” It goes beyond rote translation and instead strives to adapt the content from one language to another while maintaining its intent, style and tone. “It involves understanding the context of what we’re doing, so it’s a lot of background information, understanding where we want this language to go, what the purpose of that is,” Martino explained.

The Vida agency was originally headquartered in downtown Seattle, but left when employees began working remotely during the pandemic. As his employees began to return to the office — while maintaining hybrid schedules — Martino established several smaller regional offices so workers could be closer to home.

Given South Snohomish County’s expected growth as light rail comes to the area by 2024, Martino said she thinks downtown Edmonds is a good location for the headquarters of the ‘business.

She predicts that the agency will also continue to grow, perhaps doubling in size over the next five years.

“To think about what this county will look like in 10 years, I think this (Edmonds) is the right place for us,” Martino said.

— By Teresa Wippel

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Colorado Law Students Receive ‘Powerful’ Lessons Offering Free Immigrant Legal Services | Colorado Law https://gicarg.org/colorado-law-students-receive-powerful-lessons-offering-free-immigrant-legal-services-colorado-law/ Mon, 16 May 2022 01:34:33 +0000 https://gicarg.org/colorado-law-students-receive-powerful-lessons-offering-free-immigrant-legal-services-colorado-law/ This story was originally published by The World on May 12, 2022. It is reproduced here with permission. By Stephanie Daniel María Teresa Navas Mejía, a longtime employee at the University of Colorado at Boulder, recently received her green card thanks to Carina De La Torre and students at the law school’s Immigration Advocacy Clinic. […]]]>

This story was originally published by The World on May 12, 2022. It is reproduced here with permission.

By Stephanie Daniel

María Teresa Navas Mejía, a longtime employee at the University of Colorado at Boulder, recently received her green card thanks to Carina De La Torre and students at the law school’s Immigration Advocacy Clinic.

Credit: Stéphanie Daniel/Le Monde

Violeta Chapin, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Law, standing next to a projector, showed her students several images of different immigrant groups on the US southern border, as well as refugees fleeing Ukraine.

“There are some really striking visual differences between the treatment of refugees from Ukraine and the treatment we’ve seen of refugees, primarily from Latin America and Haiti, over the past few years, but also over the past few months,” she said. .

This class is part of the Law School’s Immigration Advocacy Clinic. It is one of nine clinics at the University of Boulder that allows students to gain hands-on experience representing clients. They provide free legal services to immigrants in the community. Some students themselves come from immigrant families.

Chapin, who was born in Costa Rica, is the director of the clinic.

“Immigrants, if they want a lawyer – and many of them do and need a lawyer – they have to pay shocking amounts for an immigration lawyer. Many of them simply cannot afford it.

Violeta Chapin, University of Colorado, Professor of Law

“Immigrants, if they want a lawyer – and many of them do and need a lawyer – they have to pay shocking amounts for an immigration lawyer,” she said. “A lot of them just can’t afford it.”

One of Chapin’s students, Larrisa Alire, who is in her second year of law school, said she has been passionate about immigration rights since she was a teenager.

“My high school was [about] 90% Latino, and a lot of my peers were undocumented, and they really didn’t find out they were undocumented until we were, you know, old enough to get our first job, and you realize that you don’t have a social security number,” she said.

Migrant rights are complex. But just like her classmates, Alire learned a lot during the one-year course. Since last fall, students have helped nearly 139 clients renew their status with Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an Obama administration law that allowed young people who came to United States as children to stay in the country.

Students

Immigration Defense Clinic students Larrisa Alire and Marina Fleming, sophomores at the University of Colorado Law School, offer free legal services to immigrants. Credit: Courtesy of Larrisa Alire and Marina Fleming

Students also work under Chapin’s supervision and license, allowing them to assist in criminal cases.

“This semester I had a criminal immigration case and my client was a lawful permanent resident charged with misdemeanors,” Alire said.

The clinic has also represented more than 20 long-time university employees from El Salvador, who have Temporary Protected Status (TPS), which allows them to work.

Students help them become permanent residents. This includes María Teresa Navas Mejía, who has worked at the university for 23 years. She is a housekeeper in the dorms and said she loves her job.

Navas Mejía obtained his green card last August.

“I feel so happy. When they told me that they were going to give me my residence, I just cried because, for me, it was a great achievement,” Navas Mejía said in Spanish.

Carina De La Torre translated for her. De La Torre is a recent Colorado Law School graduate and Chapin’s alumnus. She now works at the university as a clinical racial justice fellow at law clinics. She plans to call the bar in July and pursue immigration work with a nonprofit.

“My parents are immigrants. I have a lot of undocumented family members, and I just saw how unfair and unfair our immigration system is.

Carina De La Torre, University of Colorado Law School graduate

“My parents are immigrants,” she said. “I have a lot of undocumented family members, and I’ve just seen how unfair and unfair our immigration system is.”

One of his main tasks is working with TPS holders, like Navas Mejía, who often works in the catering and childcare services at the university.

“These employees are part of our community. their children [are] students here at CU [University of Colorado],” she said. “They own houses. They go to the same schools where the teachers have their children.

Professor Violeta Chapin

Violeta Chapin, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Law and director of the Immigration Defense Clinic, helped college employee Irma Bernard become a naturalized US citizen. Credit: Stéphanie Daniel/Le Monde

The school supports the clinic, said Patrick O’Rourke, executive vice chancellor and chief operating officer of the University of Colorado’s Boulder campus.

“It’s also important for us to be able to have a workforce that knows that if there’s a need, we’ll try to be able to respond to that need and protect them,” he said. .

The clinic is a valuable way for students to learn, he said, while serving the university’s larger mission: to advance humanity.

“Part of what we need to be able to do is understand the challenges that undocumented workers face and be able to recognize their rights and invest in our students so that we can make the world a fairer place,” said he continued.

For sophomore Marina Fleming, her work with the clinic has underscored the importance of immigration law.

“It allows you to see all of the doors that may be open to you as a practitioner and how many doors you can potentially open for other people who are navigating a number of immigration issues in their lives.”

The first-generation student said the clinic was her favorite part of law school. It makes learning real.

“To be able to go to court and just talk to a judge and feel what it feels like to stand up, to assert your voice, not for yourself, but on behalf of another person is powerful,” she said. declared.

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The scholarship will help the youngest of 12 head towards Univ. from iowa https://gicarg.org/the-scholarship-will-help-the-youngest-of-12-head-towards-univ-from-iowa/ Sat, 14 May 2022 05:08:05 +0000 https://gicarg.org/the-scholarship-will-help-the-youngest-of-12-head-towards-univ-from-iowa/ SIOUX CITY, Iowa (AP) — The youngest of 12 children and the only American-born sister, Crystal Luna knew she had to make the most of every opportunity presented to her. Not only was Luna’s family dependent on her, but she also wanted to live her own version of the American dream. On April 28, the […]]]>

SIOUX CITY, Iowa (AP) — The youngest of 12 children and the only American-born sister, Crystal Luna knew she had to make the most of every opportunity presented to her.

Not only was Luna’s family dependent on her, but she also wanted to live her own version of the American dream.

On April 28, the future 18-year-old North High School graduate received a $40,000 scholarship from the Kind World Foundation. This is the highest cash post-secondary award the local non-profit group gives out each year.

“Receiving this scholarship means so much to me,” Luna explained. “It means all my hard work was worth it.”


Since 2009, the Kind World Foundation, founded by former Gateway executive Norm Waitt Jr., has awarded more than $3 million to hundreds of high school students at eight metropolitan high schools: Sioux City East, North, West, and Bishop Heelan; the town of Southern Sioux; Dakota Valley; Sergeant Bluff-Luton; and Elk Point-Jefferson.

Luna plans to use her scholarship to study Spanish and international business at the University of Iowa, Iowa City. After that, she wants to go to law school, specializing in immigration law.

“Crystal had to mature at a very young age, has been through so much personally, and always wants to help others,” explained Marcia Waitt, chair of Kind World Foundation’s scholarship and education program. “Our program was created specifically for deserving students like Crystal.”

Luna learned a strong work ethic from her mother Yolanda Nava who herself had to leave school after fifth grade.

“My mom worked on the family farm in Mexico before she came to America,” Luna said. “My parents divorced when I was five, and life just got harder.”

Indeed, Luna spent many years living in a two-bedroom, one-bathroom apartment with her 11 siblings.

“Most of us kids slept on the floor,” she recalls. “I felt like a princess the year I got a new Care Bear blanket.”

Yet Luna’s mother worked 16 hour days to ensure her family had a roof over their heads and food on the table.

“When mom went to work, my older sister took care of me,” Luna said. “Plus, I became self-sufficient.”

It was often difficult for Luna, who didn’t feel safe because of her accent.

“Half of my family only spoke Spanish while the other half spoke both Spanish and English,” she said. “It was awkward.”

Soon the pressure got to Luna.

“I was diagnosed with anxiety and depression when I was 12,” she said. “My family didn’t understand mental illness, so I supervised my medication and found my own way to therapy.”

In fact, the only place Luna felt comfortable was at school.

“I loved school because I loved learning,” she said.

It was also a place where Luna would receive positive reinforcement for her studies.

“At school, I was the girl who always smiled with her nose stuck in a book,” Luna said.

Yet she knew that very few people understood the struggles of a first-generation student.

“Neither my mom nor my dad spoke English,” Luna said. “They didn’t know anything about college savings accounts or construction credit. When you don’t speak the language, everything seems intimidating and out of reach.

That’s why she became involved with Briar Cliff University’s TRIO Student Support Services, a program funded by the U.S. Department of Education that serves and advocates for first-generation students who were often under -represented in higher education.

“TRIO made me think about the college years before I could go,” she said. “It made me want to plan for the future.”

However, sometimes life can make you lose your mind. It happened last year when Luna’s father died suddenly.

“Losing a parent is horrible,” she said. “Something like that can put you off schoolwork or everyday life. But I wouldn’t let that happen to me.

Instead, Luna focused on her work with North High School’s student council and the National Honors Society, while becoming an Honorary Student 4.0.

“When you’re born to immigrant parents, you often have to work harder to get ahead,” she said. “You want to become a model.”

Luna is still emotional more than a week after being selected for the Kind World Foundation scholarship.

“It was so moving and so encouraging for me,” she said.

Luna’s mother, Yolanda Nava, encouraged her every step of the way.

“My mom was so happy and that made me happy,” Luna said.

Thinking for a moment, Luna remembered feeling bad about her own accent.

“Now I’m so proud of my accent because it signifies my challenges in learning a new language,” she explained. “Everything I’ve been through has made me stronger and made me the person I am today.”

As she looks to the future, Luna has some advice for first-generation students like her.

“Work hard, study hard, get involved in your community and never stop learning,” she said with a smile. “That way you can create your own American Dream.”

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Calexico teacher uses New York experience to inspire https://gicarg.org/calexico-teacher-uses-new-york-experience-to-inspire/ Thu, 12 May 2022 04:59:22 +0000 https://gicarg.org/calexico-teacher-uses-new-york-experience-to-inspire/ VSALEXIQUE — Rosa Sandigo, a Spanish teacher at Calexico High, had quite an adventure the week leading up to Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 8. First, she was taken on a plane to Manhattan on Monday, May 2, to be filmed on Tuesday, May 3 for an episode honoring teaching mothers on “The Tonight Show Starring […]]]>

VSALEXIQUE — Rosa Sandigo, a Spanish teacher at Calexico High, had quite an adventure the week leading up to Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 8.

First, she was taken on a plane to Manhattan on Monday, May 2, to be filmed on Tuesday, May 3 for an episode honoring teaching mothers on “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.”

As part of the episode, she was filmed receiving a generous gift basket from Samsung, which has sponsored the holiday-related segment for a few years.

Ninth-grade Spanish teacher Calexico Rosa Sandigo and his son, U.S. Army Sgt. Bosco Sandigo, who both appeared on a special Mother’s Day episode of “The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon” on Tuesday, May 3. | PHOTO COURTESY OF ROSA SANDIGO

Then, after being told she wouldn’t be meeting her favorite late-night TV talk show host, none other than Jimmy Fallon appeared behind a lowered curtain to present Sandigo with a bouquet of flowers.

If that wasn’t enough, Fallon also presented Sandigo with a $25,000 check, courtesy of Samsung, to honor her efforts as a teacher and mother of three.

Finally, as the educator that she is, Sandigo has turned her jaunt across the country and her brush with stardom into a teachable moment when she returns to class on Thursday, May 5.

“That’s what I want you to do, go on an adventure,” Sandigo said in his second-period Spanish class.

Of course, the type of adventures Sandigo had in mind for his students were to complete their education and pursue a career that would lead them to a fulfilling life.

During the recap of her visit to the Big Apple that she gave each period of her ninth grade Spanish classes, she highlighted her reunion in New York with a former student of Gila Ridge High School (Yuma, Arizona) . of her, Alexis Garcia.

Sandigo said she and the former student follow each other on social media accounts. So when Sandigo posted a clip of herself in New York on TikTok, the former student announced that she was living in Brooklyn and wanted to find Sandigo.

Garcia had attended Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff at a time when Sandigo’s daughter did, before moving to New York and later enrolling at New York University to earn a master’s degree in social work. At the time of Sandigo’s visit, Garcia was working as a social worker at a charter school.

Sandigo pointed to Garcia’s academic and professional background as a promising example of what his students could expect if they committed to pursuing an education and a career, and avoiding being sidelined by immature questions.

“I love seeing (students) go off and have adventures in life,” Sandigo said.

As a native of Nicaragua whose family fled her homeland in the midst of the revolution in the late 1970s, Sandigo’s own past experiences would certainly qualify her as an adventurer. In Nicaragua, she had attended mission schools run by Catholic nuns and had developed a desire to serve others at an early age.

Late-night talk show host Jimmy Fallon signed a copy of his children’s book ‘Nana Loves You More’ for Rosa Sandigo, a ninth-grade Spanish teacher at Calexico High, who appeared on his show for a special for Mother’s Day on Tuesday, May 3. | JULIO MORALES PHOTO

But when his older brother chose to end his involvement in the armed campaigns of the Sandinistas, the left-wing group began to pressure his family in retaliation for his perceived betrayal, prompting the family left behind in Nicaragua to join other who had previously moved to California.

Sandigo had just graduated from high school at the time and was doing his best to readapt to life in America. His father eventually found employment in Somerton, Arizona, where his younger siblings would go to study and graduate from nearby Yuma School.

Becoming a teacher was not something Sandigo said she always envisioned for herself. On the contrary, her current vocation testifies to the deep and lasting influence of the nuns with whom she had studied during her formative years.

“It’s always been about how I serve,” Sandigo said.

Indeed, it was her commitment to being a public servant that landed her on “The Tonight Show.”

Her television appearance began with her son’s nomination for the episode Mother’s Day Surprise. Shortly after his nomination, he learned from NBC that Sandigo was a finalist.

NBC’s response went so far as to describe her son’s nomination as an “exceptional submission.” A week later, on April 28, they both learned that she had been selected to appear on the popular show.

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“You’re coming to New York,” his son, U.S. Army Sgt. Bosco Sandigo, texted his mother to break the news before she had a chance to see the confirmation email that NBC had also sent her.

During the television segment, Sgt. Sandigo explained why he named his mother, who raised him and his siblings as a single mother. sergeant. Sandigo also highlighted how her “incredible mother” earned a master’s degree in special education and is determined to help immigrant children succeed in their adopted country to further inspire their classmates as well.

Her remarks were delivered to a camera which then filmed her mother reading aloud a scripted message thanking Samsung for supporting teachers like her.

Ninth-grade Spanish teacher Calexico Rosa Sandigo stands outside NBC Studios at 30 Rockefeller Plaza Tuesday, May 3, in Midtown Manhattan. Sandigo appeared in a Mother’s Day special on “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.” | PHOTO COURTESY OF ROSA SANDIGO

What happened next made Sandigo a star in her own right. After receiving a gift basket containing the latest Samsung devices, a nearby curtain to the left of Sandigo suddenly falls to reveal a bouquet of Jimmy Fallon flowers, which also surprised the other two mother-teacher winners.

To simply say that Sandigo was pleasantly surprised to meet Fallon unexpectedly would be a serious understatement. In a scene reminiscent of the stunned fans who greeted The Beatles in their heyday, the camera captured Sandigo instantly transforming into an exuberant bundle of joy.

This excitement also seemed to overshadow Sandigo’s reaction to the presentation of a $25,000 check from Fallon on behalf of Samsung. Afterwards, Fallon asked Sandigo what she thought of the gifts, which she could only muster, “I don’t know.”

Back in her classroom a few days later, Sandigo was still unable to describe the whole experience. Nonetheless, she was able to highlight her encounter with fame for her students throughout the day through the use of a slideshow and video clips she recorded on her phone.

Some of those images included scenes from Times Square, filled with Minnie and Mickey walking around, as well as the naked Cowboy in his trademark underpants and guitar uniform.

There was also a photo of her standing next to a movie poster advertising ‘Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness’, whose lead actor, Benedict Cumberbatch, had also appeared on Jimmy Fallon’s show the day where Sandigo was there.

“My thing is, whatever I’m going through, I want my students to go through it,” Sandigo said. “It’s who I am.”

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Maine Catholic Schools to Host Rosary Events and May Coronations to Celebrate the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima https://gicarg.org/maine-catholic-schools-to-host-rosary-events-and-may-coronations-to-celebrate-the-feast-of-our-lady-of-fatima/ Tue, 10 May 2022 15:13:25 +0000 https://gicarg.org/maine-catholic-schools-to-host-rosary-events-and-may-coronations-to-celebrate-the-feast-of-our-lady-of-fatima/ PORTLAND — The Feast of Our Lady of Fatima is Friday, May 13, marking the first day in 1917 that the Blessed Mother appeared to the three shepherd children, Francisco, Jacinta and Lucia, at Fatima in Portugal. From May to October 1917, the Lady appeared and spoke to the children on the 13th of each […]]]>

PORTLAND — The Feast of Our Lady of Fatima is Friday, May 13, marking the first day in 1917 that the Blessed Mother appeared to the three shepherd children, Francisco, Jacinta and Lucia, at Fatima in Portugal. From May to October 1917, the Lady appeared and spoke to the children on the 13th of each month. The children recounted that Our Lady told them that God had sent her with a message for every man, woman and child. She promised that God would grant peace to the whole world if her requests for prayer, reparation and consecration were heard and obeyed. In commemoration, many Catholic schools in Maine will hold special events during the week of May 13. Here is a list (in chronological order):

Friday May 13


All Saints Catholic School, Bangor
All Saints Catholic School will hold an 8:15 a.m. prayer service at the school’s St. Mary’s campus (768 Ohio Street) and will pray a decade of the Rosary, sing Marian hymns and hold a Coronation of Mary in May. Each student, from kindergarten to grade three, will place a flower near the statue of Mary. Students in grades four through eight will also gather to pray the Rosary together on the campus of St. John’s School (166 State Street).

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Salem-Keizer Public Schools Board Considers In-Person Budget Hearings https://gicarg.org/salem-keizer-public-schools-board-considers-in-person-budget-hearings/ Sun, 08 May 2022 16:46:20 +0000 https://gicarg.org/salem-keizer-public-schools-board-considers-in-person-budget-hearings/ The Salem-Keizer Public Schools Board of Trustees will meet virtually at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Among other items on the agenda, the board plans to vote on whether the budget committee can start meeting in person. The Salem-Keizer School Board has been meeting virtually for months, citing safety concerns as tensions mount at public meetings and […]]]>

The Salem-Keizer Public Schools Board of Trustees will meet virtually at 6 p.m. Tuesday.

Among other items on the agenda, the board plans to vote on whether the budget committee can start meeting in person.

The Salem-Keizer School Board has been meeting virtually for months, citing safety concerns as tensions mount at public meetings and reports of instances of harassment occurring among community members in attendance. President Osvaldo Avila clarified in November that the return to virtual meetings was unrelated to COVID-19.

On May 3, Salem-Keizer Superintendent Christy Perry proposed a 2022-23 budget of $1.36 billion to the district budget committee, highlighting allocations for things like expanding bilingual programs. , addressing mental and behavioral health issues, and creating a fund to make the replacement of school supplies fair.

From now on, the district budget committee made up of the seven school board directors, plus seven appointed community members is responsible for approving the budget, after which the school board will vote to adopt it. Meetings will be held over the next month, allowing the public to comment on the proposal.

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Community Foundation Announces 2022 Scholarship Recipients — Muncie Journal https://gicarg.org/community-foundation-announces-2022-scholarship-recipients-muncie-journal/ Fri, 06 May 2022 14:49:46 +0000 https://gicarg.org/community-foundation-announces-2022-scholarship-recipients-muncie-journal/ By Kallie Sulanke— MUNCIE, Ind.—Congratulations to the following scholarship recipients: Wyatt Bilby, a senior at Delta High School, is the recipient of the Murray’s Jewelers Scholarship. Wyatt plans to study construction management and real estate at Purdue University. He is the son of Seth Bilby. Kaydence Jean Brasseur, a senior at Wapahani High School, is […]]]>

By Kallie Sulanke—

MUNCIE, Ind.—Congratulations to the following scholarship recipients:

Wyatt Bilby, a senior at Delta High School, is the recipient of the Murray’s Jewelers Scholarship. Wyatt plans to study construction management and real estate at Purdue University. He is the son of Seth Bilby.

Kaydence Jean Brasseur, a senior at Wapahani High School, is a recipient of the Sue Harris Unsung Hero Scholarship. Kaydence plans to study human life sciences at Indiana University East. She is the daughter of Joanna Brewer and Brian Brewer.

Lydia Evans, senior to Cowan Jr./Sr. High School, is the recipient of the Muncie Elks Lodge 245/H. Wayne Standerford Scholarship. Lydia plans to study audiology at Ball State University. She is the daughter of Cindy Evans and Keith Evans.

Audrea Haynes, a senior at Wes-Del High School, is the recipient of the Sarah E. Adams Scholarship. Audrea plans to study sports management at Taylor University. She is the daughter of Jerry Haynes and Shelley Williamson.

Javin Kile, a senior at Delta High School, is the recipient of the Delta Eagles Wrestling Scholarship. Javin plans to study biology at Hanover College. He is the son of Jen Joslin and Greg Kile.

Trey Michael Mathews, a senior at Muncie Central High School, is a recipient of the Jerry Parrish Scholarship, the Ross Family Autism Scholarship, and the Lathrop P. Johnson Scholarship. Trey Michael plans to study Spanish Education and Mathematics at Ball State University. He is the son of Stephanie Joseph.

Aidan Pierce, a senior at Delta High School, is the recipient of the Charles W. and Jane (Klipsch) Thomas Scholarship. Aidan plans to study mechanical engineering at Purdue University. He is the son of Tony and Jenifer Pierce.

Mallory Schwer, a senior at Delta High School, is the recipient of the Delaware Community Schools Memorial Scholarship. Mallory plans to study brain and behavioral sciences at Purdue University. She is the daughter of Jeff and Teresa Schwer.

The Community Foundation will announce scholarship recipients in the order in which students accept the scholarships. To view all of the 2022 Community Foundation Scholarship recipients, visit cfmdin.org/our-scholars.

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Officials grapple with bullying and fights at Baltimore County schools https://gicarg.org/officials-grapple-with-bullying-and-fights-at-baltimore-county-schools/ Wed, 04 May 2022 02:31:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/officials-grapple-with-bullying-and-fights-at-baltimore-county-schools/ Baltimore County Public Schools is seeing an increase in students bullying one another, and teachers and administrators are being caught in the crosshairs. Maureen Burke, who taught Spanish at Dulaney High School for 24 years, said fights broke out regularly. Recently, there were three in one day. “It was never like this,” Burke said. She […]]]>

Baltimore County Public Schools is seeing an increase in students bullying one another, and teachers and administrators are being caught in the crosshairs.

Maureen Burke, who taught Spanish at Dulaney High School for 24 years, said fights broke out regularly. Recently, there were three in one day.

“It was never like this,” Burke said.

She said it was more like a handful of fights a year. Burke said two teachers tried to intervene to break up a fight in March. Both were injured.

“So it wasn’t that these two students were attacking these two teachers,” Burke said. “It’s just that unfortunately these two teachers, trying to break up the fight, ended up getting injured and had to spend time away from school.”

Billy Burke, the executive director of the Council of Administrative and Supervisory Employees (CASE), which represents managers and administrators, said he knew an assistant manager whose hand was broken trying to break up a fight and other administrators who were injured.

“I know of a director who seriously injured his back while intervening,” Burke said.

Christian Thomas, a senior at Eastern Technical High School, is the student council member. He said that when he visited schools and spoke to students, he heard the same thing.

Thomas said: “I always ask students, what is one thing you would do to change your school if you could. And almost always the response was, “I’ll make it feel safer” or “I’ll stop the fighting and the bullying.”

Although the school system could not provide data on the rate of bullying and fighting, school superintendent Darryl Williams confirmed this in an interview.

“Unfortunately, as I talk to my colleagues across the state, in many other systems outside of the state, there’s this increase in behaviors,” Williams said.

So what’s going on here?

County school officials, wondering what to do about the violence, describe a perfect storm. There is bullying and fighting for all on social media. Students lost important connections with each other and with adults when school buildings were closed for COVID-19. There are more lost ties: educators leaving the profession and the school system scrambling to fill hundreds of vacancies.

“There are definitely not enough of us,” said teacher Maureen Burke. “There are too many and not enough to meet their needs.

For example, the American School Counselor Association recommends a ratio of 250 students to each school counselor. Superintendent Williams said the ratio in the county is around 300 to 330 students per councillor. Williams expects to get 33 additional councilors in the county’s budget this coming fiscal year.

“I’m glad we’re getting closer and closer to that 250 student-to-advisor ratio,” Williams said.

Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski accepted Williams’ request for the 33 councilors and included it in his proposed budget that is currently being considered by the county council.

In a statement, Olszewski said, “Now more than ever, as we emerge from the pandemic, counseling professionals are essential to ensuring the emotional well-being of our children.”

Then there is the fear that the worst students will not be punished appropriately.

At a recent school board meeting, Cynthia Koenig said her child, who attends Perry Hall Middle School, was attacked on a school bus. She said the perpetrator received a two-day suspension.

“A two-day suspension for violently stomping my child’s head on the floor of the bus resulting in a large bloody laceration to the head and a concussion,” Koenig told the board.

School system spokesman Charles Herndon did not confirm the suspension, saying they were prohibited from disclosing disciplinary actions.

“There was a belief that we weren’t offering consequences,” Superintendent Williams said. “We follow our code of conduct. Students will be suspended or receive consequences based on an infraction.

CASE’s Billy Burke said data shows minorities and special education students are disproportionately expelled. So, state law makes it harder for all students to get lengthy suspensions and expulsions.

Burke said, “I think there’s probably a solution in how we’re developing alternative schools. I think there is a solution in how we expand online learning opportunities.

Superintendent Williams said they are taking action. In addition to the new counselors, many county schools will receive student safety assistants.

“Being the first group to interact with kids who may be having difficulty like defusing a situation, a potential fight,” Williams said.

There will also be four new floating positions for the School Resource Officer program. These officers will respond to schools where trouble is brewing.

“These incidents do not reflect the 111,000 students who are in our buildings, coming to our buildings every day, on time and doing what they need to do,” Williams said. “But there are these exceptions where the schools and the central office are working together to fix it.”

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Google employees gave their employer top marks, as did teachers at Tanglin Trust School: survey https://gicarg.org/google-employees-gave-their-employer-top-marks-as-did-teachers-at-tanglin-trust-school-survey/ Mon, 02 May 2022 10:15:58 +0000 https://gicarg.org/google-employees-gave-their-employer-top-marks-as-did-teachers-at-tanglin-trust-school-survey/ Can Are teachers as professionally fulfilled as Google employees? A poll suggests the answer might be yes. Singapore’s Best Employers 2022, a recent independent employee survey conducted by The Straits Times and listed global data firm Statista 200 of the most attractive employers to work for in Singapore. Google ranked first on the list, while […]]]>

Can Are teachers as professionally fulfilled as Google employees? A poll suggests the answer might be yes.

Singapore’s Best Employers 2022, a recent independent employee survey conducted by The Straits Times and listed global data firm Statista 200 of the most attractive employers to work for in Singapore. Google ranked first on the list, while Tanglin Trust School, an international non-profit school in Singapore, ranked eighth.

Tanglin tops 192 enterprises and institutions with at least 200 employees. The British international school was not only in the top 10 with Google, but it also topped the education category nationally.

“At Tanglin, we always have the interests of our staff at the forefront when formulating or modifying personnel policies,” Tanglin Trust School CEO Craig Considine said in a statement.

“Staff will perform at their best when they feel valued and supported, and we strive to ensure that this is always the case.”

In the survey, employees anonymously rated their employers based on various aspects of their job, work environment and employer reputation. Source: Straits Times Graphics/Singapore’s Best Employers 2022

Are Tanglin teachers as happy as Google employees?

According to The Straits Times, the list is the result of an online survey conducted in August and September last year. Over 17,000 employees were interviewed while over 200,000 recommendations were assessed for the survey.

Employers were primarily rated based on whether their employees would recommend them to a friend or family member.

Responses were scored on a scale of 0 to 10, where 0 means “I would not recommend my employer in any way” and 10 means “I would definitely recommend my employer”.

The survey shows that Google employees are a happy bunch with a score of 9.16, while Tanglin received a score of 8.4. The lowest score on the list is seven.

Google has consistently been ranked among the best companies to work for in numerous surveys.

The company has won several Comparable rewards, including Best Places To Work in Denver 2022, Best Places To Work in Austin 2022, Best Global Culture 2022, and Best Company Outlook 2022, to name a few. The company was also a regular on Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” list; in 2017, he ranked first.

Tanglin has also consolidated its position as an attractive employer in Singapore and ensures its teachers feel valued and supported. This is echoed by his teachers.

James Russell, 46, a teacher who has worked in schools in England, Chile and Brunei, told the Straits Times he was struck by the warm reception he received compared to other resettlement experiences he had had.

“When I arrived in Chile from England, I was taken to a small apartment that I had to find myself. I was taken to a supermarket, but I didn’t speak a word of Spanish,” he said.

“Whereas here, Tanglin helped us so much when we landed with the necessities: an iron, an ironing board, dishes in the kitchen, things like that. I felt so valued. I felt like I had someone to turn to. »

He added that when COVID-19 travel restrictions eased, he and his family were able to fly home to visit. Tanglin has “bent over backwards” to support them and other overseas staff by adjusting official school holidays and buffering delayed returns to Singapore.

During the pandemic, their staff took the initiative to send care packs to quarantined colleagues, putting together a spreadsheet with names, isolation dates, addresses and requests for assistance . They also volunteered to provide food, books and board games to fill these care packs and deliver them to quarantine locations, the report said.

Teaching in Singapore can be demanding

When the pandemic hit, the service tenure of Singaporean primary and secondary school teachers fell, averaging between five and nine years, according to Statista 2020 Data Report.

He added that education in the country is demanding; many work long hours and have to deal with the double stress of ensuring both the academic performance of their students and the ad hoc tasks imposed on them for extracurricular activities.

Meanwhile, lockdowns in china prompted many teachers from the private and international sectors to leave the city. In the USA, nearly 550,000 teachers resigned from the private education sector between January and November.

Tanglin, on the other hand, has an average seniority of 8.6 years. Its 300 foreign employees, a little more than half of the workforce, benefit from the school’s welcoming and supportive community.

“We are actively seeking feedback from our staff on current policies and implementing any necessary changes,” Considine said.

“We have support groups around certain initiatives – mental health, maternity, diversity and inclusion, menopause, etc. They are great vehicles for starting conversations and understanding what is working well and what could be improved.

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Aspiring Teachers Participate in SVCC Inaugural Symposium – Shaw Local https://gicarg.org/aspiring-teachers-participate-in-svcc-inaugural-symposium-shaw-local/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/aspiring-teachers-participate-in-svcc-inaugural-symposium-shaw-local/ DIXON — Brenda Tavares helped in a bilingual kindergarten class, earning Education Pathways honors for her high school diploma. So it was a pleasure to have a one-on-one conversation Friday with Superintendent of Public Schools Carmen I. Ayala, who has specialized in bilingual education throughout her career. “I definitely want to work in a bilingual […]]]>
State Superintendent of Education Dr. Carmen Ayala (middle) will present certificates on Friday to students who have graduated from the Education Pathways program.
Erie-Prophetstown students Ryan Roman (left), Ben Lantz and Connor Sibley go through paperwork during an activity at the SVCC Education Symposium on Friday, April 29, 2022. The symposium was for high school students who wanted to enter the field of education.
Christine Schweitzer gives Maddison Morgan, a student at Rock Falls, information about NIU's College of Education on Friday during the SVCC Education Symposium.

Golden Apple Finalists

Participating schools

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