Spanish schools – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 06:37:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://gicarg.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-105x105.png Spanish schools – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ 32 32 Nord Anglia Education Launches $ 500,000 Community Investment Fund to Help Students Make a Difference https://gicarg.org/nord-anglia-education-launches-500000-community-investment-fund-to-help-students-make-a-difference/ https://gicarg.org/nord-anglia-education-launches-500000-community-investment-fund-to-help-students-make-a-difference/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 06:11:26 +0000 https://gicarg.org/nord-anglia-education-launches-500000-community-investment-fund-to-help-students-make-a-difference/ Student Advisory Council leads new investment fund improving student social impact projects LONDON, October 13, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Nord Anglia Education today announced the launch of a new US $ 500,000 community investment fund to support the activities of its students as part of its social impact program with UNICEF. Nord Anglia Education […]]]>

Student Advisory Council leads new investment fund improving student social impact projects

LONDON, October 13, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Nord Anglia Education today announced the launch of a new US $ 500,000 community investment fund to support the activities of its students as part of its social impact program with UNICEF.

Nord Anglia Education logo

Each academic year, students from 76 North Anglia schools around the world will be able to apply for scholarships from the $ 500,000 to launch and strengthen their local social awareness projects. This year, in line with UNICEF’s core advocacy areas, students at Nord Anglia will address and develop solutions to challenges related to climate, education, immunization, mental health and wellness.

Student funding requests will be assessed by the new Student Advisory Council. The nominated group of 15 student leaders from across the North Anglia school family will be responsible for reviewing and recommending social impact projects for funding each year.

In addition to further developing students’ understanding of some of the world’s biggest issues, Nord Anglia’s Social Impact program challenges young people to work in partnership with community groups and local charities to take direct action. . New $ 500,000 A community investment fund has been created to help students maximize the lasting impact of their projects.

Nord Anglia’s Social Impact Program enriches every school’s curriculum by providing students with exciting opportunities to develop critical and creative thinking, advocacy and problem-solving skills.

Earlier this year, Nord Anglia entered into a new three-year global partnership with UNICEF to help students acquire the knowledge and skills to effect positive change in their communities.

Lord David puttnam, Chairman of the Education Advisory Board of North Anglia, said, “Global citizenship starts with education, which is why we create experiences for our students to make a lasting difference in their local communities. With the launch of our Community Investment Fund and Student Advisory Council, we challenge students to create and deliver community projects with long-term impacts. By working as a team and seeing firsthand what it takes to make a positive difference, our students can develop the creativity, resilience, and leadership skills to drive change as global citizens.

Dr. Jane gaskell, Member of the Education Advisory Board and Chairman of the North Anglia Charitable Giving Committee, said, “Our social impact program encourages students to engage in projects that will bring about positive and lasting social change. They will develop skills by working with diverse communities, making financial decisions and evaluating the results of their projects. In a rapidly changing world, these are key skills that will help students achieve success in whatever they choose to do or be in life. “

About Nord Anglia Education

Nord Anglia Education (NAE) is the world’s leading premium school organization, with 76 schools in 31 countries. Our schools go beyond traditional learning to deliver transformational, high-quality education to 68,000 students from kindergarten through high school. We offer several internationally recognized study programs including English Program, International Baccalaureate, Swiss Maturity, and American Program, among others.

Our global reach allows us to recruit and retain world-class teachers and provide our students with unforgettable experiences through our partnerships with world-class institutions. The Juilliard school, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and UNICEF. As a member of the NAE family, every student can connect and collaborate on our tailored Global Campus platform to bring their learning to life beyond the classroom.

Founded in 1972 in the UK, initially offering learning services such as ESL courses, NAE opened its first international school in 1992: the British School Warsaw. In the 2000s, NAE began to strategically focus on high-end international schools, with rapid growth in Asia, Americas, China, and through Europe and the Middle East. In July 2019, the company moved its headquarters from Hong Kong To London.

For more information, please visit www.nordangliaeducation.com.

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Quality of education at the heart of Roaring Fork School Board Applicant Forum https://gicarg.org/quality-of-education-at-the-heart-of-roaring-fork-school-board-applicant-forum/ https://gicarg.org/quality-of-education-at-the-heart-of-roaring-fork-school-board-applicant-forum/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 18:22:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/quality-of-education-at-the-heart-of-roaring-fork-school-board-applicant-forum/ Roaring Fork School District Education Council candidates, left to right, Chase McWhorter, Kenny Teitler and Kathryn Kuhlenberg at the Questions and Answers forum at Morgridge Commons on October 11.Rich Allen / Freelance Post Responding to the diverse and ever-changing needs of students through improving teacher compensation and promoting parent involvement was a focal point of […]]]>

Roaring Fork School District Education Council candidates, left to right, Chase McWhorter, Kenny Teitler and Kathryn Kuhlenberg at the Questions and Answers forum at Morgridge Commons on October 11.
Rich Allen / Freelance Post

Responding to the diverse and ever-changing needs of students through improving teacher compensation and promoting parent involvement was a focal point of discussion in a forum for the four candidates from the Roaring Fork School District in Morgridge. Commons at Glenwood Springs Library Monday evening.

The Questions and Answers forum showcased Glenwood Springs voting metrics for the upcoming election and posed questions to candidates for the two vacant Education Council seats.

Chase McWhorter runs against Kenny Teitler for District A seat. Kathryn Kuhlenberg runs against Steven Fotion for District E.



Kuhlenberg and Teitler are both trade educators, while McWhorter and Fotion are corporate directors touting an outsider’s point of view.

In their assessments of the state of education at the local level, Teitler and Kuhlenberg both focused on how expectations of teachers have changed and made quality education a moving target. McWhorter and Fotion both felt the bar had been lowered nationally.



Roaring Fork School District Education Council candidates, left to right, Kathryn Kuhlenberg and Steven Fotion at the Questions and Answers forum at Morgridge Commons on October 11.
Rich Allen / Freelance Post

“Our education expectations have become skewed, if you will, since we started teaching to test instead of teaching to think,” Fotion said.

All the candidates believing that there is room for improvement locally, the question has become of methodology. Parental involvement, meeting individual student needs – especially across the English / Spanish language barrier – and increasing teachers’ salaries for retention facilities were all mentioned.

Kuhlenberg pointed to the newly mandated universal preschool program in the state of Colorado as a way to prepare students for success early on.

“This program can go very well or very badly,” Kuhlenberg said of the program’s implementation in 2023-24. “(Early childhood education) is our only chance to prevent the formation of an achievement gap… If we can prevent this gap from forming, we are not catching up with 13 or 15 year olds. “

Kuhlenberg said the successful use of factory royalty replacement funds can help promote universal preschool education. She and Teitler have spoken out in favor of increasing the factory fee waiver that would provide landowners with $ 7.7 million to raise wages to increase employee wages.

Fotion has said he is “currently” against the 5B vote, but his position is changing as he learns more about where the funds are going. McWhorter expressed a similar concern, saying he wanted to be sure the money was going to teachers.

“This one is tricky for me because I would say, in general, I’m generally against any sort of tax unless you’ve exhausted the cost cuts,” McWhorter said. “I completely sympathize with the cost of living here. My main concern with the mill tax to support it is that you would want a microscope on that money to make sure it goes to the teachers. “

In an earlier presentation on the 5B ballot issue, Roaring Fork School District Superintendent Rob Stein and Glenwood Springs Middle School teacher Autumn Rivera said the funds would lead to an increase. 12-15% for most staff – including maintenance, bus drivers and others – but not district management.

In a predominantly Latin American neighborhood, the question of reaching these students directly was considered. Teitler, a bilingual veteran of the Roaring Fork School District, said more needs to be done to close the achievement gap between Latino students and their white peers. He said the latter tests 40 more points.

“We have to look at what children need based on where they come from, what their education is,” Teitler said. “If you have a student starting kindergarten who doesn’t speak English, you can’t teach him the same way you can teach another student entering kindergarten who is fluent in English. “

All of the applicants agreed that promoting parental involvement is an immediate way to foster student success. All said that some form of increased access to the school board would be a benefit, although McWhorter suggested including limits and Kuhlenberg suggested appointing a board member to act as a referee for one. selection of schools.

Voting measures

Prior to the Board Candidates Forum, panels on each of the Glenwood Springs sample voting questions were held.

On Amendment 78, the Conservation Fund Ownership Initiative, Michael Fields of Colorado Rising State Action made a statement in support via a statement provided.

Fields also wrote in support of Proposition 120, the Lower Property Tax Rates initiative and keep $ 25 million in the TABOR surplus revenue initiative. Marianne Virgili, of the Colorado Mountain College board of trustees, spoke out against it, saying lower property taxes do not translate directly into lower rent rates.

On voting questions 2A and 2B, which would increase the taxes and debt of the Town of Glenwood Springs for construction work relating to the Glenwood Springs Municipal Airport, Mayor Jonathan Godes submitted a statement in favor. Federal Mineral Lease District pilot and Gregg Rippy said, “This voting problem is an outrageous price tag that is not being charged by current airport users.”

Rivera and Stein responded to concerns about 5B, the increased factory fee waiver.

“What we are looking at is reducing the curricula, increasing the class sizes because we have reached a point where there is nothing more to do,” said Stein.

The ballots were mailed out on October 8. The election is November 2.


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Pilot Program Brings Spanish Classes to South Knoxville Elementary School https://gicarg.org/pilot-program-brings-spanish-classes-to-south-knoxville-elementary-school/ https://gicarg.org/pilot-program-brings-spanish-classes-to-south-knoxville-elementary-school/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 21:50:30 +0000 https://gicarg.org/pilot-program-brings-spanish-classes-to-south-knoxville-elementary-school/ KNOXVILLE, Tennessee (WATE) – South Knoxville Elementary launched a new program this fall, teaching Spanish to second and third graders. The students immerse themselves in the language and the educators hope to make the pilot something permanent. “I think it’s exciting to discover another culture. We have a certain diversity in our school, in our […]]]>

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee (WATE) – South Knoxville Elementary launched a new program this fall, teaching Spanish to second and third graders. The students immerse themselves in the language and the educators hope to make the pilot something permanent.

“I think it’s exciting to discover another culture. We have a certain diversity in our school, in our district and it’s great to learn about it from a different perspective, a different perspective, ”said Dr. Tanna Nicely, Principal of South Knoxville Elementary School.

The school partners with Centro Hispano in East Tennesssee to bring in teachers once a week and guide students through an interactive Spanish immersion.

“Something as simple as language can really open the world up to people,” said Claudia Caballero, President and CEO of Centro Hispano.

The nonprofit organization is the primary resource for the Latin American community in East Tennessee.

“Much of the world speaks Spanish. Being able to have these language skills as basic as they can be is beneficial, ”Caballero said.

School and community leaders are already seeing how bilingual education can help children from all walks of life.

“Really increases your earning potential, your worldview, your comfort in navigating the world, your opportunities and your ability to see different people and different cultures in a new light,” Caballero said.

Principal Dr Nicely says they have decided to target younger grade levels because science shows that the sooner a child is exposed to a new language the better.

She believes it is an invaluable life skill and that learning is contagious.

“I think once we have the data and are able to share it with other directors in the district, I feel like this is something that is going to catch on. You have seen it yourself; the excitement is enough, the data is enough to say it’s working, ”said senior manager Dr Nicely.

The county commission, city council and school board all helped launch the program.

The pilot program is funded until December.

If successful, community and school leaders may wish to roll out the program to all elementary schools in the district.


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A look at Connecticut’s growing and diverse Hispanic and Latino populations https://gicarg.org/a-look-at-connecticuts-growing-and-diverse-hispanic-and-latino-populations/ https://gicarg.org/a-look-at-connecticuts-growing-and-diverse-hispanic-and-latino-populations/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 15:26:31 +0000 https://gicarg.org/a-look-at-connecticuts-growing-and-diverse-hispanic-and-latino-populations/ The 2020 census results confirmed what had already been underway for many years: In Connecticut, Hispanic and Latino population growth is the most striking of any group in the state. As Hispanic Heritage Month draws to a close this week, an analysis of the responses people who identified as Hispanic or Latin American gave to […]]]>

The 2020 census results confirmed what had already been underway for many years: In Connecticut, Hispanic and Latino population growth is the most striking of any group in the state.

As Hispanic Heritage Month draws to a close this week, an analysis of the responses people who identified as Hispanic or Latin American gave to the US Census Bureau shows that their numbers have grown at a rapid rate, this community of Connecticut has become increasingly diverse.

The state’s Hispanic and Latino population includes people of diverse backgrounds. By far the largest group are residents of Puerto Rico, followed by Mexicans, Dominicans, Ecuadorians, Colombians and Guatemalans.


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Parents in Bexar County support school mask policies https://gicarg.org/parents-in-bexar-county-support-school-mask-policies/ https://gicarg.org/parents-in-bexar-county-support-school-mask-policies/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 15:42:44 +0000 https://gicarg.org/parents-in-bexar-county-support-school-mask-policies/ Most voters in Bexar County believe local schools should continue to enforce mask policies for students and staff, according to the latest Bexar Facts / KSAT / San Antonio Report poll. Many school districts in the San Antonio area have instituted mask warrants for anyone entering school facilities, despite Gov. Greg Abbott’s executive order prohibiting […]]]>

Most voters in Bexar County believe local schools should continue to enforce mask policies for students and staff, according to the latest Bexar Facts / KSAT / San Antonio Report poll.

Many school districts in the San Antonio area have instituted mask warrants for anyone entering school facilities, despite Gov. Greg Abbott’s executive order prohibiting public entities from requiring masks. The mask warrants came as the delta variant spiked in late summer among people who tested positive for the coronavirus and were hospitalized.

The poll conducted late last month asked registered voters in Bexar County whether local schools should continue to enforce mask policies for students and staff, and 74% of those polled said they were d ‘OK.


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Fall fishing really kicks off as October marks the start of steepest drop in water temperatures | Sports https://gicarg.org/fall-fishing-really-kicks-off-as-october-marks-the-start-of-steepest-drop-in-water-temperatures-sports/ https://gicarg.org/fall-fishing-really-kicks-off-as-october-marks-the-start-of-steepest-drop-in-water-temperatures-sports/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 04:15:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/fall-fishing-really-kicks-off-as-october-marks-the-start-of-steepest-drop-in-water-temperatures-sports/ Here we find ourselves in October along the Crystal Coast, the month with the biggest drop in surf temperatures, from almost 80 degrees at the end of September to almost 70 at the end of the month. Thus, between the drop in water temperature, the decrease in daylight, the southern trace of the sun, the […]]]>

Here we find ourselves in October along the Crystal Coast, the month with the biggest drop in surf temperatures, from almost 80 degrees at the end of September to almost 70 at the end of the month.

Thus, between the drop in water temperature, the decrease in daylight, the southern trace of the sun, the migration of monarchs, the sulfur butterflies in the air, the ripening sea oats, the dragonflies, and of course, mullet strikes, these are all signs of falling and invigorated fishing.

Yes… “Sign, sign everywhere a sign blocking the landscape, breaking my mind, do this, don’t do that, can’t you read the sign? “

We and the fish read these signs, thanks to the “Five Man Electrical Band”. Water temperatures will continue to drop until January and will not return to the 80s until July 4.

I mentioned the mullet strikes, but not only are mullet plentiful for many predators, we also see large schools of capucettes, anchovies, and menhaden offering an assortment of food options as well. Some of the first responders are the long lost chompers, mackerel, blues (Where were they this summer?)

False albacore and blues will stick around until fall, but Spanish and Royal macks are starting to move as water temperatures drop into the ’60s. They both tolerate temperatures of up to 68 degrees. about, but if the bait is plentiful, the Spaniards will hold it around 65 degrees when exiting around Cape Lookout and the warmer east side of Lookout Shoals. This year, so far, the king’s bite has been excellent, and I’ve never seen the number of big and fat, beefy Spaniards in the 4 to 8 pound range. Really muscular Spanish!

Although the old drum bite continues, it is fading in the Neuse and New rivers, and exhausted spawners are now returning to the ocean and are now targeted along the surf area around the inlets as ‘they come out for the winter. Ocracoke and Portsmouth Islands are expected to be hot spots, as well as Topsail Island’s surf and piers for these fish. The top bait is the mullet cut in the waves on circular Owen Lupton-type hooks, often in the middle of the night. We also see slit reds entering the fall waves after coming out of shrimp and mullet.

Of course, fall fishing is traditionally highlighted by speckled trout fishing in the waves. It has a long and rich tradition. In years past, some of the best peaches have been in the weeks around Thanksgiving. More recently, this peak catch season appeared to be earlier and shorter as the spots head south for the winter. We have had several good summers of trout fishing in our backwaters and no serious winter trout have been killed recently so we should have a great fall comeback every time that happens.

In the good old days, some of the best hot spots were the areas just east of our sea fishing piers. This was the time when we had eight fishing piers, now reduced to two due to storms and the proverbial wrecking ball. The areas east of Oceanana and Bogue Inlet piers remain good targets, and if you remember where the old piers were, you can still fish for their remains. One location with remains of a pier and other hard structures is the Iron Steamer access to Pine Knoll Shores where pieces of the scuttled blockade runner Pevensey still remain near the shore.

Wade? The season is closed, and we only have visions of plum because we have no idea what 2022 will bring us in terms of regulations, and this after a great short two-week season.

Next week I’ll be writing about bottom feeders, spots, mullet, pompano and puffers.

———————

As I walked the Bogue Inlet pier daily to collect my daily buckets of water to measure surf temperatures, the past week was marked by some nice catches of pompano.

After a bit slow summer catches, the pompano bite was excellent. Sand fleas, prawns, and pink fish bites all grabbed this excellent fish. I have seen double digit catches of these silvery fish with striking yellow highlights. The sea mullet and the possible start of a good fall run, hopefully, were also part of the mix. Interestingly, a few puffs started to appear as well. The action of the pier is also reflected in the surf if you know where to go.

Surfing action is finally showing signs of life, especially around the calanques of Bogue and Beaufort. There were some good runs of early morning Spanish, blues and false albacore, with Fort Macon out of The Point in Emerald fishing.

By the way, over the weekend the Big Alberts took over the Morehead City Turning Basin. They competed everywhere with the Spanish and blue monsters for the capucette and the red mullet. To my delight, slit reds are finally appearing around both areas on cut mullet baits and metal spoons, like the Kastmaster. I like the gold version, three quarters of an ounce. There are also mentions of black drum landing from the waves and even of a speckled trout or two from early scouts. I’m ready.

Fishing inside reds and trout continues to be very good with reds on the shallows. Both fish take artificial ones, but the live shrimp on a plug were hard to beat, especially at the onset of the ebb tide.

Last week I fished a few of the streams on Hwy 24 without finding any trout so I tried a few of the streams in White Oak River with some, but minimal success. Another fisherman claimed to have caught a 4.5 pound trout in one of these creeks last week. Unsurprisingly, the New River is still home to some of the biggest trout. If you are bait fishing indoors the black drum catches are always great with fish weighing up to 10 pounds, and while it lasts the sheep head action is really good as they flip over. in the ocean. This is a good time of year to target sheep heads from the fishing docks.

From the Atlantic Beach King Mackerel Fishing Tournament this weekend, we know some of the best fish have been caught at Big-10 / Little-10, Northwest Places and 14-Buoy through 90-Foot Drop. . As you move into the deeper waters, beautiful wahoos are also captured. The winner ABKMT was disembarked from the Easy Out boat and weighed 47.54 pounds. By the way, the triggerfish action is really great right now, and there isn’t a better tasting fish IMHO.

———————

So how about the fishing docks?

Oceanana Pier again reports BIG Spanish at 6 pounds, false albies, blues, red drum, a few spots, mullet and a brief (very brief) tarpon hookup.

Bogue Inlet Pier had a mix of fish ranging from Spanish and blues to sea mullet, a few points and some nice catch of fall pompano on prawns, chips and pink fishbites. In a warm-up for their annual fall king mackerel tournament, the anglers landed five kings last week.

Seaview Pier brought back six kings last week, BIG Spanish, spots, pompano and blues.

Surf City Pier reports that the spots present themselves well on bloodworms, mullet and a mix of bottom dwellers. There were also three kings captured last week.

Jolly Roger Pier brings back good fishing with well presented spots, blues, spanish, mullet and a king last week.

———————

FYI: The Bonner Bridge Fishing Pier and Viewing Area opened last weekend.

It is the southern remnant of the dismantled Bonner Bridge and spans 1,046 feet (https://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/bonner-bridge-pier.htm).

There is more information on the bridge with work on the Emerald Isle Bridge continuing this week with likely lane closures overnight. They will be working from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m., so be warned. For more information see: https://www.emeraldisle-nc.org/.

Wrong notes

1) Consult me ​​at www.Facebook.com/Dr.Bogus.) Log onto my website at www.ncoif.com.

2) “Ask Dr. Bogus” is on the radio every Monday at 7:30 am WTKF 107.1 FM and 1240 AM. The show is also rebroadcast on Sunday morning at 6 a.m. Callers can reach me at 800-818-2255.

3) I am located at 118 Conch Ct. In Sea Dunes, just off Coast Guard Road, Emerald Isle, NC 28594. The mailing address is PO Box 5225, Emerald Isle, NC 28594. Don’t forget a check- gift for your favorite fisherman for fishing lessons or my totally fake fishing report subscription. Please drop by at any time and say “Hello” or call 252-354-4905.


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Future of School presents inaugural resilient district awards to innovative American schools https://gicarg.org/future-of-school-presents-inaugural-resilient-district-awards-to-innovative-american-schools/ https://gicarg.org/future-of-school-presents-inaugural-resilient-district-awards-to-innovative-american-schools/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 16:07:41 +0000 https://gicarg.org/future-of-school-presents-inaugural-resilient-district-awards-to-innovative-american-schools/ Six schools and two districts across the United States received Resilient Districts awards by Future of School It is an honor for us to present the first Resilient Districts awards at the school and district levels, both to highlight these wonderful solutions designed by educators, but also to support the continuation and uptake scale of […]]]>

Six schools and two districts across the United States received Resilient Districts awards by Future of School

It is an honor for us to present the first Resilient Districts awards at the school and district levels, both to highlight these wonderful solutions designed by educators, but also to support the continuation and uptake scale of these practices within their respective districts.

The future of school (FoS), an education intermediary organization mobilizing change in American K-12 education, announced that six schools and two districts have received the Resilient Districts (RDP) top awards. The awards are designed to recognize and support the growth of innovative practices that have had a significant positive impact on student learning during the challenging 2020-21 school year.

“Educators from schools across the country have demonstrated their incredible passion, creativity and resourcefulness during the pandemic,” said Amy Valentine, CEO and Education Evangelist for the School’s Future. “Faced with this great challenge, educators came up with ideas that would help their students succeed and did so without any expectation of reward or recognition. It is an honor for us to present the first Resilient Districts awards at the school and district levels, both to highlight these wonderful solutions designed by educators, but also to support the continuation and uptake scale of these practices within their respective districts.

Each grantee received up to $ 25,000 at the district level or $ 10,000 at the school level, which can be used for technology, professional development, training, or other learning-related expenses. line and mixed. Educators whose effective practices have earned RDP recognition will be inducted into a collaborative cohort with other awardees and will have the opportunity to share their unique experiences and expertise with a national audience of fellow educators throughout the year. future. Educators will share their ideas through podcast interviews, nationally published blog posts and articles, virtual event presentations, and more. It is an exciting opportunity to see their successes and inventive ideas celebrated and shared with their peers in the profession.

The first eight RDP recipients and their award-winning programs are:

Davidson Academy Online

Reno, Nev.

This fully online school has developed creative and engaging ways for students to connect online that support their social and emotional health and nurture relationships with themselves and with school staff.

Largo International High School

Prince George County Public Schools

Largo, MD.

Educators created the Your Big Year (Virtual) Impact Challenge, a dynamic live, digital program designed to bridge cultural divides and provide young people with a transformative and hands-on way to meet and collaborate with a diverse group of peers from around the world. .

KIPP Harmony Academy

KIPP Baltimore

Baltimore, Maryland.

This primary school provided access to simple tools, such as headphones, to allow differentiation in a socially distanced learning environment.

Newman-Crows Landing Unified School District (USD)

Newman, California.

Leaders in this 3,200-student district implemented online trauma training delivered by the Successful Practices Network (SPN) to all staff and students in the district during the pandemic.

Olympic high school

Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools

Raleigh, North Carolina

The school created the Prosperity by Design program, which includes a menu of essential digital tools for empowering teens, including an experiential learning and career exploration website called “Career Snapshots”.

Silverton School District

Silverton, Colorado.

This small district of 65 students has provided a system for genuine personalized learning opportunities. The district has incorporated six different elements into a distance learning environment to ensure high quality teaching and engagement in a traditionally unique learning environment.

Southern College

Newburgh Greater Town School District

Newburgh, New York

This school provided a technology-based, student-centered learning environment to increase the engagement and academic performance of English language learners (ELL) in English language courses (ELA).

Spanish River Community High School

Palm Beach County District

Boca Raton, Florida

This high school has developed a hands-on, technology-based biotechnology curriculum to stimulate student engagement, experiential learning, and academic advancement in high school science courses.

AASA, the Association of School Superintendents and the Successful Practices Network (SPN), which provides personalized design support, advice and training related to dropout prevention, trauma skills, vocational and technical education (CTE) and literacy, are strategic partners of the Resilient Districts Award.

“Innovation at the school and district level is imperative to deliver equitable, learner-centered education to all learners,” said Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director of AASA. “We are thrilled to partner with Future of School, an organization committed to innovation and equity in K-12 education, to recognize outstanding districts, schools and educators who put practice high impact ideas big and small. “

“The Resilient Districts Prize fulfills an important role in celebrating educators who have stepped up to develop personalized approaches in a challenging environment and providing them with the resources to continue their efforts,” said Ray McNulty, president of SPN. “We look forward to further supporting these schools and districts and seeing what they achieve next. “

About the future of the school

Future of School (FoS) mobilizes change in American K-12 education from one system to one that ensures all students reach their unlimited potential, no matter where their learning takes place. By amplifying the impact of technology on students and educators, FoS informs, inspires and leads much needed transformation. Learn more about http://www.futureof.school

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Monterey Peninsula Unified School District addresses socio-emotional needs with equine therapy – Monterey Herald https://gicarg.org/monterey-peninsula-unified-school-district-addresses-socio-emotional-needs-with-equine-therapy-monterey-herald/ https://gicarg.org/monterey-peninsula-unified-school-district-addresses-socio-emotional-needs-with-equine-therapy-monterey-herald/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 20:58:37 +0000 https://gicarg.org/monterey-peninsula-unified-school-district-addresses-socio-emotional-needs-with-equine-therapy-monterey-herald/ CARMEL VALLEY – Saddles hanging from gates, hoof prints stuck in hay and spools of worn rope – have you walked into a stable or a therapist’s office? For some students and staff at the Monterey Peninsula Unified School District, the answer is both. With the help of the Equine Healing Collaborative, students, teachers and […]]]>

CARMEL VALLEY – Saddles hanging from gates, hoof prints stuck in hay and spools of worn rope – have you walked into a stable or a therapist’s office? For some students and staff at the Monterey Peninsula Unified School District, the answer is both.

With the help of the Equine Healing Collaborative, students, teachers and parents of Monterey Peninsula Unified will have access to new group equine therapy sessions starting next week.

Scheduled during after-school hours and weekends, the two-hour sessions located at the collaborative’s Carmel Valley ranch will provide targeted mental health support to different areas of the district. Opportunities available include group therapy for 13-17 year olds, the LGBTQIA community, and Spanish speaking women.

Offered as an option to get out of schools for help, these sessions trade couches for corrals to address the socio-emotional shortcomings the district has endured since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Many needs have also arisen with COVID for students and staff,” said Donnie Everett, deputy superintendent of the Unified Multilevel Support System for the Monterey Peninsula. “Being able to go outside, interacting with the horses in a safe environment and having plenty of time to think is another kind of alternative experience that we’ve seen people respond to well. “

Unlike traditional treatments, the equitherapy office is not bounded by walls and self-reflection involves caring for an animal rather than answering a question. Mental health specialists observe clients as they lead, groom and interact with the horses. As clients build relationships with their clogged confidants, they tap into and process emotions otherwise difficult to uncover in regular person-to-person conversation.

This alternate connection between man and horse is what the Equine Healing Collaborative and the Monterey Peninsula Unified hope to cultivate among students, staff and parents – a goal long overdue.

The upcoming Equine Sessions are an extension of a relationship that Monterey Peninsula Unified and the Equine Healing Collaborative have cultivated over the past 18 months. Although a collaboration was briefly discussed in early 2020, the program only took off when the pandemic revealed how important face-to-face connection can be and what is missing when it is gone.

“It has become a way to connect with each other and get away from the screen,” said Meghan Giles, mental health specialist at the Equine Healing Collaborative. “It’s taxing to do distance learning every day, so we wanted to give them a break and the opportunity to just be in nature. “

When it became increasingly clear that in-person classes weren’t coming back anytime soon, Giles, who is also a mental health specialist with Monterey Peninsula Unified, knew that equine therapy could provide a much-needed break for one. seemingly endless screen time. Even as the threat of COVID-19 had just set in, she and two other mental health specialists pitched their idea to the district. Momentum for the program has since built.

“The program really caught on like wildfire,” said PK Diffenbaugh, superintendent of Monterey Peninsula Unified. “We started with a small group of students, then it turned into a waiting list. … It really responds to a need that we are seeing at all levels of the district in terms of having to fill in socio-emotional support and personal care.

“Being able to offer different avenues of mental health support was important to us because we really saw the need for it. The need has always been there, but it became more acute during the pandemic. “

According to a 2020 mental health screening of nearly 2.5 million people nationwide, Mental Health America has found that the stress of COVID-19 has a lasting and detrimental impact. It found that 77% of young people surveyed were at risk of emotional, attentional or behavioral difficulties. More than half a million people screened had anxiety and almost 85% reported suffering from moderate to severe depression. Controllers attributed these mental health issues in large part to feelings of isolation and loneliness triggered by the pandemic.

The story was the same at Monterey Peninsula Unified.

“I think for the students there has been an increase in isolation, anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts,” Diffenbaugh said. “For staff and teachers, moving to distance learning was new and very difficult for people. Educators get their energy from seeing students every day, and not seeing them made an already difficult job all the more demanding.

Upon returning to school, these problems have persisted and presented in the form of emotional disruption, or when someone cannot properly deal with emotional responses to situations, Giles explained.

“A lot of children now find it difficult not to have the ability to self-regulate and learn,” she said. “We look back on their current situation and what they have lost in the last year in terms of social skills. “

It turns out that equine therapy is particularly suitable for treating deregulation.

“Equitherapy is so great because you have to be self-regulated,” Giles said. “Horses feed on your energy.”

Like humans, horses are sensitive to movement and emotion, often reflecting client behavior and conveying understanding without a verbal response. Clients can then use a horse’s mirror reaction as an internal recording and develop their self-awareness, Giles said.

This recalibration opportunity is one of the ways Diffenbaugh believes Monterey Peninsula Unified can get back on track for this school year.

“People need unconditional support,” he said. “They need to be able to express themselves without being judgmental and without being ashamed. … It is difficult to open up to another human being when this approach allows a different path to tap into different emotions expressed in a truly healthy way.

So far, the response has been only positive and the job is not nearly done.

“It was a very powerful experience for all of us,” said one teacher of his time in equine therapy. “It was wonderful to see each individual grow on their own journey, and I am grateful for the safe space to reflect on my own internal thoughts and processes.”


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4,400 migrant children want to go to school https://gicarg.org/4400-migrant-children-want-to-go-to-school/ https://gicarg.org/4400-migrant-children-want-to-go-to-school/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 04:28:55 +0000 https://gicarg.org/4400-migrant-children-want-to-go-to-school/ Characteristics Jensen La Vende 3 hours ago A Venezuelan girl holds an alphabet card at Queen’s Park Oval where migrants registered to live in the TT in 2019. – PHOTO BY ANGELO MARCELLE Of the 16,523 registered Venezuelans, at least 4,400 are children who are supposed to be in school. Instead, students are in a […]]]>

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A Venezuelan girl holds an alphabet card at Queen’s Park Oval where migrants registered to live in the TT in 2019. – PHOTO BY ANGELO MARCELLE

Of the 16,523 registered Venezuelans, at least 4,400 are children who are supposed to be in school.

Instead, students are in a parallel education system awaiting approval from the Department of National Security to allow them access to public schools. In the meantime, 1,400 migrant students have enrolled in Equal Place, a parallel education system developed in 2019.

Equal Place uses the NotesMaster and Daware online platforms to teach children, preparing them to enter the school system. It is promoted by the Education Working Group (EWG), comprising UNICEF, UNHCR, Living Water Community (LWC), TTV Solidarity Network, Catholic Education Board of Management (CEBM), Archdiocesan Ministry for Migrants and refugees (Archbishop’s Office), the Pan American Development Foundation (PADF) and the Ministry of Education.

In the past two years, none of the migrant children have been able to access formal education in private and public schools.

Association of Faith-Based Education Councils President Sharon Mangroo said that in 2019 the government approached the organization to help prepare migrant students to enter the school system.

“About two years ago, almost three years ago, the Prime Minister asked the Archbishop to take responsibility for the education of migrant children. The Archbishop met with the then Minister of Education, then the Minister of National Security and they worked out a procedure to do so. The main thing is that the Ministry of National Security must give its approval.

When contacted for an update, National Security Minister Fitzgerald Hinds said: “This matter is not before me as Minister of National Security in any way.”

Venezuelan children disembarked with adult migrants in Los Iros. – PHOTO BY LINCOLN HOLDER

Mangroo said the Catholic School Board has prepared at least 100 Venezuelan children for entry to primary school and is awaiting approval.

“The provision is that no local child should be adversely affected. No local child should be denied a place in school. So what we are doing is that we have identified the primary schools, because we do not touch the secondary, it is too controversial, in which there are school spaces.

“So we identified them, and then we did the rest of the things we needed to do. We made sure that they were children whose parents had registration cards and that they had enough English not to. not disturb the school. “

She added that teachers have also been trained to teach English as a second language so that students and teachers are prepared.

Mangroo said it was even more difficult to get migrants into secondary schools due to demand for places among local children. She underlined that none of the migrants are “in school” because it is illegal but access some form of formal schooling.

“Every child in the area would love to go to one of the high schools. So no, we didn’t plan to have the kids there at all, not at the day school. We have made premises available for extracurricular activities for these children.

She said that before the schools closed, at least three schools had been made available to help migrant children with their secondary education after school.

UNHCR, in a statement to the Sunday Newsday, reaffirmed that education is a basic human right, “it doesn’t matter who someone is or where they come from”.

“Being able to go to school gives children a chance to do more than just learn numeracy and literacy, but also essential social and life skills. In addition to the efforts supported by UNHCR, many organizations and entities have tried to provide means of informal educational engagement for children. However, these temporary interventions cannot replace the opportunity to formally attend school and engage in the holistic learning that the school environment provides.

In January, UNICEF Child Friendly Spaces coordinator Matthew Batson said migrant children of primary school age were taking the same subjects as those enrolled according to Ministry of Education guidelines. , which include math, English, language arts, science, social studies, and physical science. education.

Rihanna Mercedes Mendoza Salazar at the Kaisokah School of the Arts, San Fernando, where she learned about Trinidad’s carnival culture. – PHOTO BY ROGER JACOB

The UNHCR statement adds: “Investing in strengthening the local education system, promoting the inclusion and integration of refugees and migrants, and recognizing international certificates and diplomas, rather than setting up parallel structures, cannot that be beneficial to the overall educational infrastructure of the country.

According to UNHCR’s June report on Venezuelan migrants in the Caribbean, the Equal Place program has 1,235 students and 1,022 participate regularly. The report added that 140 students were registered to join physical classes and were due to start in September, but with schools not opening for all students, that plan was postponed. Sunday Newsday learned that no migrant child had obtained a student permit allowing them to be enrolled in school.

In Guyana, 740 Venezuelan children aged 5 to 16 were enrolled in their public schools. UNHCR’s June report says Venezuelan children face difficulties accessing education in the Caribbean, mainly in non-Spanish speaking countries such as Aruba, Curaçao, Guyana and TT.

The report said: “Although Caribbean countries are bound by international legal obligations to provide education for all children, in practice, access to formal and accredited education remains a challenge.

Even in countries where official access is granted for public primary and secondary education, Venezuelan children and youth face administrative, financial, linguistic and cultural barriers. Access to higher education and cases of xenophobia and bullying at school also remain difficult. “

The report says that in Aruba and Curaçao, migrant children have access to primary and secondary schools but are required to provide compulsory school insurance, with Aruba requiring a “local guarantor”. In both islands, lessons are taught in Dutch, Papiamento and English.

There are 46 refugees and asylum seekers in the TT between the ages of 17 and 20 who have been nominated to take college-level courses online, according to the report. The program is a collaborative effort between EdX, an online education platform built by Harvard and MIT, and Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU) in Qatar. Refugees and asylum seekers have also received vouchers to take online courses that can count towards micro-licenses and micro-masters.

In the statement, UNHCR said it has participated in and supported many educational initiatives with UNICEF, the Living Water Community and the Catholic Education Council, to help refugee, migrant and local children continue their education. despite the challenges of distance learning. UNHCR said it has good technical relations with the Ministry of Education and stands ready to support the government with any technical or capacity building assistance, including language training, translations, additional classrooms, l equipment and furniture.

Venezuelan families gather in front of Queen’s Park Oval, Port of Spain to register to live at TT in 2019. – PHOTO BY ANGELO MARCELLE

“Globally, UNHCR advocates for the inclusion of refugee children in public education and other social protection systems. We hope this can happen in the TT as well, as in other Caribbean and Latin American countries, including Guyana, the Dominican Republic and Aruba. Education for all is imperative for the future. “

Mangroo said they were ready and patiently awaiting national security approval. In March, 13,800 Venezuelans applied to be re-registered after the 2019 registration expired. Those who fail to re-register will face deportation, like all illegal immigrants.

Mangroo added: “Guyana has 740 children in its public schools. I don’t know why we can’t get ours. We are all ready, we are ready to welcome them, once we get the approval, but we cannot move because it is out of the law.


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WWW SCCPSS will host vaccination clinics in high schools in the region https://gicarg.org/www-sccpss-will-host-vaccination-clinics-in-high-schools-in-the-region/ https://gicarg.org/www-sccpss-will-host-vaccination-clinics-in-high-schools-in-the-region/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 21:07:06 +0000 https://gicarg.org/www-sccpss-will-host-vaccination-clinics-in-high-schools-in-the-region/ The SCCPSS is committed to providing resources to our students and staff to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19. To help achieve this goal, the SCCPSS has partnered with St. Joseph’s / Candler Health System, Coastal Georgia Department of Health, Hospice of Savannah, Savannah Fire Department and Chatham Emergency Services to organize vaccination clinics in […]]]>

The SCCPSS is committed to providing resources to our students and staff to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19. To help achieve this goal, the SCCPSS has partnered with St. Joseph’s / Candler Health System, Coastal Georgia Department of Health, Hospice of Savannah, Savannah Fire Department and Chatham Emergency Services to organize vaccination clinics in area high schools for staff and students. 12 years or older. Schools were divided into clusters with neighboring primary and secondary schools assigned to a high school. First shots, second shots and Pfizer boosters will be offered to those who meet the criteria. All sites will offer vaccinations from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the dates specified. No appointment is required, but participants must register before the date of the vaccination clinic. A link to register for each site can be found in the table below. Parental authorization is required for anyone under the age of 18.

COVID-19-Vaccine-Consent-ENGLISH.pdf

COVID-19-Vaccine-Consent-SPANISH.pdf

Protect yourself. Protect each other. Protect your community.

High school
Cluster schools
Dates

Vaccine clinic room

Beach high school
Vaccination registration link
Elementary Hodge

DeRenne Middle

Gadsden Elementary School

Gould Elementary School

Mercer Middle

Garrison School of Arts

Building Middle Bridges

1st dose – October 18, 2021

2nd dose – November 4, 2021

Clinic
Groves High School
Vaccination registration link
Rice stream

Port Wentworth Elementary School

Elementary Pooler

1st dose – October 1, 2021

2nd dose – October 22, 2021

Cafeteria
Island High School
Vaccination registration link
Coastal medium

Swamp

May Howard

Maritime Tybee Island

1st dose – October 4, 2021

2nd dose – October 25, 2021

College and career hall (in front of the building)
Jenkins High School
Vaccination registration link
Juliette Low Elementary

Hesse K-8

island of hope

1st dose – October 5, 2021

2nd dose – October 26, 2021

Cafeteria
Johnson High School
Vaccination registration link
Myers High School 1st dose – October 6, 2021

2nd dose – October 27, 2021

Auditorium
New Hampstead High School
Vaccination registration link
The Bloomingdale Elemental

New Hampstead K-8

Godley K-8 Station

Chatham West Elementary School

Chatham West Center

1st dose – October 7, 2021

2nd dose – October 28, 2021

Auditorium (hall entrance)
Savannah Arts Academy
Vaccination registration link
Jacob G. Smith

Charles Ellis

1st dose – October 12, 2021

2nd dose – October 29, 2021

Cafeteria
Savannah Early College High School and Savannah High School Liberal Studies School
Vaccination registration link
Henderson Formey

Shuman Elementary School

Hubert Midfielder

AB Williams

1st dose – October 13, 2021
2nd dose – November 1, 2021
Windsor Forest High School
Vaccination registration link
Largo Tibet elementary school

Pulaski Primary School

Southwestern Elementary

Southwest Center

Windsor Elementary School

STEM @Bartlett

Georgetown K-8

1st dose – October 14, 2021

2nd dose – November 2, 2021

Cafeteria
Woodville Tompkins High School
Vaccination registration link
Primary garden city

Brock Elementary School

Building high bridges

1st dose – October 15, 2021

2nd dose – November 3, 2021

Media center


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