Spanish schools – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 11:33:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gicarg.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-105x105.png Spanish schools – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ 32 32 Brooke Howard is the student of the month for September at Rock Falls–Shaw Local High School https://gicarg.org/brooke-howard-is-the-student-of-the-month-for-september-at-rock-falls-shaw-local-high-school/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/brooke-howard-is-the-student-of-the-month-for-september-at-rock-falls-shaw-local-high-school/ Brooke Howard is a 17-year-old high school student at Rock Falls High School. She is the daughter of Brad and Anie Howard. She has a brother, Josh. She’s from Rock Falls. Which class do you find really engaging and why? I find my Spanish 4 course really engaging. Every day I can improve my Spanish […]]]>
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Help out in Berkeley classrooms https://gicarg.org/help-out-in-berkeley-classrooms/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 23:04:47 +0000 https://gicarg.org/help-out-in-berkeley-classrooms/ Jacqueline Omania helps student Mila calculate zero waste at Oxford Elementary on December 9, 2021. Credit: Kelly Sullivan Tocosa Onea started volunteering in Hannah Margulis-Kessel’s kindergarten class in 2016. Six years later, he’s still her right-hand man. Most of the time, he spends two or three hours in room 112 at Washington Elementary preparing supplies […]]]>
Jacqueline Omania helps student Mila calculate zero waste at Oxford Elementary on December 9, 2021. Credit: Kelly Sullivan

Tocosa Onea started volunteering in Hannah Margulis-Kessel’s kindergarten class in 2016. Six years later, he’s still her right-hand man.

Most of the time, he spends two or three hours in room 112 at Washington Elementary preparing supplies for art projects, pouring glue into small cups or working with students in small groups. He does whatever is necessary, but his favorite part of the day is reading. He loves to read aloud – “I’m becoming a great drama queen,” he jokes – but he also enjoys listening to students read to him.

“I think it’s very important to have children in your life. I get that connection here,” he said. “I felt really thrilled to be in their presence. They are so receptive and so open-minded and open-hearted.

Each year, the Berkeley Public Schools Fund places hundreds of volunteers like Onea in Berkeley classrooms to help tutor students, assist teachers, and serve as mentors.

The Education Fund is currently looking for additional volunteers to help with the school on a regular basis. Volunteers are paired with a Berkeley Unified Educator and assist in the classroom, work with students in small groups, and prepare class materials. They can also help coach sports teams, stock school library shelves, and support extracurricular groups like debate and robotics.

In the 2021-2022 school year, the fund placed 650 volunteers in classrooms, significantly more than usual because, that year alone, parents were required to attend the program. So far this year, 127 volunteers have been placed in classrooms.

Volunteers can work in classrooms ranging from transitional K-12 at Berkeley Adult School. Volunteers are expected to help at least one hour per week throughout the school year, although about half of volunteers contribute more than this, and some volunteers have up to three placements. Times are flexible and can be decided with the class teacher.

To become a classroom volunteer, complete the application form. Volunteers are matched with a teacher based on their grade, subject, and school preference, as well as where there is a higher need.

Class volunteers attend orientation and receive training throughout the year on topics such as literacy instruction and queer and gender inclusion.

During the pandemic, Berkeley Public Schools Fund volunteers have become essential to BUSD families, helping run the Ed-Hub, delivering groceries to families in need and more.

There are also volunteer opportunities to help out in the short term. Those interested can help with COVID-19 testing and vaccination clinics, attend school events, help with grant writing and more. Spanish speakers can volunteer with the Spanish language team to provide translation assistance. You can choose the volunteer opportunities that interest you when you apply to become a school support volunteer.

“Teaching is too much for one person”

Tocosa Onea is now in its sixth year as a volunteer in Hannah Margulis-Kessel’s kindergarten class. Credit: Ally Markovich

Onea, 68, has no children himself and his great-nieces and great-nephews live far away, many in Alabama, where he grew up.

Onea worked as a mental health counselor and case manager with the city of Berkeley until his retirement in 2015. When an acquaintance suggested he volunteer as a counselor at Berkeley schools, he told her. refused, but instead decided to try volunteering in a classroom.

As a volunteer, he enjoys interacting with children. It provides a structure for his retreat, and in turn, students receive additional reading and math support and another role model in their lives.

Before Onea started volunteering in her classroom, Margulis-Kessel was exhausted and considered quitting the profession.

“Teaching is too much for one person,” said Margulis-Kessel, now in her 15th year of teaching. “I am grateful for the help.”

Having another mentor — especially one with different life experiences — is a blessing, she said.

“I think the No. 1 thing we need in schools is just loving, caring adults,” Margulis-Kessel said.

“It’s important to me that kids have positive experiences with a black man,” Onea added.

Over the years he volunteered in his class, Onea and Margulis-Kessel grew closer, and Onea helped fill an important gap.

“I’m counting on you,” Margulis-Kessel told Onea, seated at a picnic table outside Washington.

When asked when he would retire from volunteering, Onea said he doesn’t plan on quitting anytime soon.

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The group aims to start an immersion charter school https://gicarg.org/the-group-aims-to-start-an-immersion-charter-school/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 16:01:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/the-group-aims-to-start-an-immersion-charter-school/ FREDERICK, Md. — In the spacious basement of her Urbana home, Li Zhou caught the attention of preschoolers sprawled on the carpet in front of her. She read them a picture book about kindness. The book was written in English, but before turning each page, Zhou addressed the children in Mandarin Chinese, describing drawings, asking […]]]>

FREDERICK, Md. — In the spacious basement of her Urbana home, Li Zhou caught the attention of preschoolers sprawled on the carpet in front of her.

She read them a picture book about kindness. The book was written in English, but before turning each page, Zhou addressed the children in Mandarin Chinese, describing drawings, asking questions and cracking jokes.

Zhou runs A&D Stars, a preschool Chinese immersion program and daycare for children ages 2-5. It opened in 2015.

She is also part of a group working to open a language immersion charter school in Frederick.

The MeriSTEM public charter school would offer streams in Spanish and Chinese and promote bilingualism in young children, according to a nearly 200-page application submitted to the Frederick County School Board earlier this year.

It would emphasize science, technology, engineering and math, and employ an “experiential learning” approach emphasizing hands-on activities.

The school would prioritize English language learners, who the founders hope will eventually make up 20% of the student body.

Victoria Thornton, who enrolled her 4-year-old twins in Zhou Nursery School in March 2021, did most of the writing for MeriSTEM’s application. She studied psychology and neuroscience at Stanford University and said she wants her kids to be bilingual even though she isn’t.

“Looking around Frederick, I just saw there’s obviously no opportunity for continued Mandarin immersion,” Thornton said. “So when I approached Li, I thought, ‘Maybe if she’s interested, we could start a charter school. … And she said, ‘You share the same dream as me.’ »

Zhou and his colleagues do not actively teach Mandarin to their preschoolers. Instead, they aim to speak to them in Chinese for about 80% of the school day — although the breakdown varies from child to child, Zhou said, depending on their familiarity with the language.

Young children are “sponges,” Zhou said, and immersing them in a second language early gives them a much better chance of becoming fluent.

“They acquire it naturally,” Zhou said. “They don’t even have to think about it.”

About half of his current students are exposed to Mandarin at home, Zhou said. But even those who have no initial skills in Chinese learn it during their time in kindergarten. After three years with her, many children can hold a conversation in Mandarin, Zhou said.

But when they leave Zhou’s preschool and enter the Frederick County public school system, Zhou said, many students will likely lose touch with the language.

“I feel a bit sad for them. It’s a lost opportunity,” Zhou said. “Some come back to visit, and I can feel the difference.”

Originally, Thornton and Zhou said, the couple envisioned a school focused on Chinese immersion. Later they added a Spanish option, hoping it would appeal to more families and attract enough students to get started.

Public charter schools receive government funding, but they operate separately from the local school system and are responsible for paying many of their own bills.

Frederick County currently has four charter schools.

Zhou and Thornton applied to the school board in May for MeriSTEM with the goal of opening in fall 2023. The school’s name comes from a type of plant cell found at the tips of roots and branches .

The school board planned to discuss the proposal on Aug. 10, when it heard the recommendation from FCPS Superintendent Cheryl Dyson.

The district superintendent does not vote on whether to approve a charter school application, but his recommendation is a starting point for board discussions.

In its response to MeriSTEM’s application, Dyson noted that the bilingual immersion program would be unique for Frederick County and that the school would likely have strong community partnerships.

But she expressed concern about the school’s budget and the fact that she hadn’t nailed down a facility.

Dyson also noted that bilingual teachers are rare and said the founders did not develop a sufficient plan to translate teaching materials.

She recommended that the board deny MeriSTEM’s application.

Dyson’s comments were uploaded to BoardDocs, the school board’s site for sharing documents with the community, about a week before the Aug. 10 meeting.

Zhou and Thornton withdrew their candidacy soon after and are working to address Dyson’s concerns.

Both women said they weren’t dropping out of school. They plan to resubmit the application in about six months, Thornton said.

“We were basically told the app had to be bulletproof to be approved,” Thornton said.

In addition to Zhou and Thornton, 19 other people are listed on the application as “founding members”. They include a doctor, a physicist, a teacher, an engineer and a pastor from a Chinese church.

Zhou said most of the founding members were either the parents of his preschoolers or the parents of his long waiting list. Some people join the waiting list as soon as their children are born.

MeriSTEM’s application included letters of support from the Asian American Center of Frederick (AACF) and Centro Hispano de Frederick.

AACF Executive Director Elizabeth Chung and Centro Hispano Director Maria Shuck each wrote that their organizations would support MeriSTEM through community outreach and mentorship.

Both wrote that the school would be a valuable addition to the West Side of Frederick, where the founders said they hoped to settle.

In another letter of support, the Maryland Alliance of Public Charter Schools (MAPCS) wrote that the school “has the expertise, momentum, commitment and community support to provide innovative and exemplary bilingual language immersion and STEM programming to students and families in Frederick County.”

Additionally, the alliance wrote, MeriSTEM was one of two statewide founding groups chosen for its “mentorship cohort,” meaning Thornton, Zhou and others from the school would receive a year training and technical support from MAPCS.

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Theodore and Spanish Fort are expecting a Class 6A, Region 1 physical battle Friday night https://gicarg.org/theodore-and-spanish-fort-are-expecting-a-class-6a-region-1-physical-battle-friday-night/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 18:15:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/theodore-and-spanish-fort-are-expecting-a-class-6a-region-1-physical-battle-friday-night/ Since Spanish Fort began playing college football in 2016, the Toros have each played at least once at 15 of the 22 high schools located in Mobile County. One of the exceptions? Theodore. These two schools have never played. That changes Friday night on the Hill when the fifth-ranked Bobcats (4-0) travel to face Spanish […]]]>

Since Spanish Fort began playing college football in 2016, the Toros have each played at least once at 15 of the 22 high schools located in Mobile County.

One of the exceptions? Theodore. These two schools have never played.

That changes Friday night on the Hill when the fifth-ranked Bobcats (4-0) travel to face Spanish Fort in a key Class 6A, Region 1 game.

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“I feel like our kids are going to see an opportunity to play against a really good opponent, and I don’t think they’re going to back down,” Toros first-year coach Chase Smith said this week on Sports Talk 99.5 FM in Mobile. . “It looks like it will be a hard-fought, tight-knit type game. It’s good football. That’s what we expect here. »

Theodore, playing in Class 6A for the first time since AHSAA increased to seven rankings in 2014, is 3-0 in Region 1 play with the toughest part of his schedule remaining at to play. Following Friday’s game on the Hill, the Bobcats travel to take on Class 7A Opelika in an out-of-region game next week and host No. 3-ranked Saraland on Oct. 21. Blount, McGill-Toolen and St. Paul’s are also still on the second half of the slate.

“If you look at our schedule, it’s definitely tough from now on,” Theodore’s coach Eric Collier said.

Spanish Fort are 2-1 in regional play after last week’s 35-24 loss at Saraland, but Smith said he liked the progress he’s seen from his team in the first four weeks of the season.

“The kids did exactly what we asked them to do,” Smith said. “They play with effort. We didn’t see the effort I felt capable of at first. Every week we have improved and as a head coach that is what you want to see. I think the work ethic is improving, our attention to detail is improving. We just need to see this more every week. Really, my challenge for them is not to plateau, but to keep improving. The effort, purpose and passion are there.

Theodore won this year like Collier always has with the Bobcats — running the football and playing defense. Theodore has beaten his opponents 156-16 this season. No one has scored more than 13 points against the Bobcats.

“Coach Collier did a great job,” Smith said. “They are a very good program and have had great success in the past and so far. They’re just really, really physical. They won’t mess around. They’re not going to have a lot of smoke and mirrors. They’ll run into you. It’s a real blue-collar mindset.

This year, that mindset is centered on senior running back Brayden Jenkins. The 5-foot-9, 175-pound standout rushed for 568 yards and 8 touchdowns on 55 carries, averaging 10.3 yards per carry.

“He’s totally different from most guys we’ve had in the past,” Collier said. “He’s not as tall, but he has phenomenal vision. He’s probably the best I’ve ever trained to have that ability to put his foot in the ground and get back up. He has a knack for indoor games.

Jenkins also impressed Smith.

“He’s a very good football player,” he said. “Dynamic, elusive, difficult to approach. He has the sense to run between tackles. They have a power racing game. It’s kind of their mantra and their attitude, and he does it well. This team knows exactly what their identity is and exactly what their coaches are asking them to do and that’s what you’re going to get from them.

Spanish Fort’s Jake Godfrey looks for a running lane against Saraland on Friday, September 9, 2022. (Helen Joyce | contributed)

Collier sees a lot of similarities in his team and the team at Spanish Fort. Against Saraland last week, the Toros used both Brayden Walker and UAB commitment Jake Godfrey at quarterback and took advantage of the stretch run game with Sawyer Wilson breaking two long runs for touchdowns.

“I think they’ve found their niche,” Collier said. “They’re a pure stretch team, and they do a great job with that. Defensively, they are physical and will come after you. Honestly, we’re a lot alike.

Both coaches are expecting a tight game on Friday night.

“Most of these games – when the teams are roughly even – come down to about five games,” Smith said. “Will it be a special teams game or mainly defensive or attacking? It is to be determined. We have to be prepared when the opportunity arises to make an explosive play in attack, to gain an advantage in defense or to make a dynamic play in special teams. We have to win these games.

Both teams must also avoid anticipating next week’s clashes.

In addition to Theodore’s trip to the #3 Class 7A Opelika, Spanish Fort will host rival Daphne.

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Phoenix police search for suspect in school lockdown after releasing 3 students https://gicarg.org/phoenix-police-search-for-suspect-in-school-lockdown-after-releasing-3-students/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/phoenix-police-search-for-suspect-in-school-lockdown-after-releasing-3-students/ PHOENIX — Phoenix police are continuing to search for the suspect in the Central High School lockdown Friday after three students were cleared in the investigation, authorities said. The male students were named victims of the assault on Saturday afternoon, according to a press release from the Phoenix Police Department. Police said a fight broke […]]]>

PHOENIX — Phoenix police are continuing to search for the suspect in the Central High School lockdown Friday after three students were cleared in the investigation, authorities said.

The male students were named victims of the assault on Saturday afternoon, according to a press release from the Phoenix Police Department.

Police said a fight broke out and reports of a possible shooting put nearby high schools under lockdown by the afternoon.

Xavier College Preparatory, Brophy College Preparatory and Phoenix Coding Academy were closed as a precaution while police worked to clean up classrooms at Central High.

Classrooms were vacated at 2:20 p.m. and students were escorted to a nearby park where parents were waiting.

“At this point, police have found no evidence of a firearm on campus or evidence that a shot was fired. The investigation continues as the students are released,” the Phoenix Police Department said. said.

Anyone with information about the incident has been asked to call the Phoenix Police Department at 602-262-6151 or, to remain anonymous, Silent Witness at 480-948-6377 or 480-837-8446 for the Spanish.

We want to hear from you.

Do you have a story idea or advice? Pass it on to the KTAR News team here.

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Ministry of Education hints at plans to introduce Mandarin to other secondary schools https://gicarg.org/ministry-of-education-hints-at-plans-to-introduce-mandarin-to-other-secondary-schools/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 02:23:19 +0000 https://gicarg.org/ministry-of-education-hints-at-plans-to-introduce-mandarin-to-other-secondary-schools/ – Advertising – By Carlena Knight [email protected] Discussions are underway to extend the foreign language program in schools. This expansion will see Mandarin being taught in other schools in addition to Sir Novelle Richards Academy, which is to date the only public school in Antigua and Barbuda to have an official Mandarin department. According to […]]]>

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By Carlena Knight

[email protected]

Discussions are underway to extend the foreign language program in schools.

This expansion will see Mandarin being taught in other schools in addition to Sir Novelle Richards Academy, which is to date the only public school in Antigua and Barbuda to have an official Mandarin department.

According to Director of Education Clare Browne, plans are in place for the language to be taught in other secondary schools as well.

However, the missing element, he said, is the number of teachers in this field.

“We need to have Mandarin teachers to deliver it to the 13 public secondary schools we have. At the moment we haven’t had, at least I don’t know of any applications that have come to us to teach Mandarin and so once we are able to find teachers,” Browne said.

He explained that there should be at least two to three Mandarin teachers, depending on the size of the school.

Because of this need, the principal has called for those interested in teaching the language to apply for the Ministry of Education.

“I know that several people here in Antigua and Barbuda would have studied in China…and if they are interested in applying to be a Mandarin teacher at one of our schools, please apply.

“We would like to take Mandarin to other schools. I was actually just discussing with the vice principal and Mrs. Mills the other day about taking Mandarin because they started sort of a pathway at Glanvilles secondary and so, we wanted to put it there in a definitive, kind of way . Once resources permit, once we can find a human resource, we will release it as quickly as possible,” Browne added.

Browne was speaking Thursday morning at the press conference to announce this year’s CSEC results.

Last year, the CEO of the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC), Dr. Wayne Wesley, hinted at plans for the inclusion of Mandarin in the region.

Mandarin is a group of Sinitic (“Chinese”) languages ​​and dialects that are natively spoken throughout much of northern and southwestern China.

French and Spanish are the two modern languages ​​that are usually taught in the CSEC curriculum, but in 2017, 65 students from Barbados and Guyana registered for the exam to write Portuguese for the first time.

In 2013, Guyana became the first country to have taught Portuguese in secondary schools.

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RHS Grad Eve Lescovitz participates in an exchange program in Washington, D.C. https://gicarg.org/rhs-grad-eve-lescovitz-participates-in-an-exchange-program-in-washington-d-c/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 18:15:33 +0000 https://gicarg.org/rhs-grad-eve-lescovitz-participates-in-an-exchange-program-in-washington-d-c/ By Melissa Moore-Randall Eve Lescovitz, a graduate of the Revere High School Class of 2020, has just completed her first summer as a program assistant for the Institute for Training and Development at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. “I had the wonderful opportunity to spend the summer with 15 amazing international economics and business scholars […]]]>

By Melissa Moore-Randall

Eve Lescovitz, a graduate of the Revere High School Class of 2020, has just completed her first summer as a program assistant for the Institute for Training and Development at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

“I had the wonderful opportunity to spend the summer with 15 amazing international economics and business scholars during their training under the American Institutes for Scholars Study, a series of academic exchange programs sponsored by the US State Department and conducted by ITD In my time with them, we have done everything from visiting the Massachusetts Statehouse and the US Capitol, attending a conference at the International Monetary Fund, doing from biking down the Potomac to white water rafting down the Deerfield River, I’ve lived a million summers in 6 weeks.

According to their website, The Institute for Training and Development (ITD) is a non-profit organization based in Amherst, Massachusetts dedicated to education and cross-cultural exchange. ITD has supported civic engagement, academic exchange, youth leadership, sustainable development and other priority areas around the world by immersing community leaders, scholars, professionals, government and non-government administrators in engaging programs from over 100 countries. ITD specializes in short-term academic, professional and youth exchanges.

Eve, the daughter of Rich and Diane Lescovitz, attended AC Whelan Elementary School and Susan B Anthony Middle School. She will begin her freshman year this fall at UMass. “I’m super excited to get back to campus and get back to living and seeing my friends. I will continue my work with ITD as a program assistant and also return for my second semester as a peer tutor at the school’s learning resource center, where I mentor students enrolled in introductory courses in Spanish and political science.

She is pursuing a double major in political science and Spanish, and is also pursuing a certificate in international relations. “I chose to pursue International Relations as well because after taking introductory political science classes, my first semester of freshman year. I realized that I found domestic politics and US government a bit boring and I enjoyed learning more about global politics and foreign policy. I like learning more about how the United States interacts with other countries than how we interact with ourselves, even though it may definitely be interesting sometimes, especially lately.

Like so many students, Eve’s college experience has been negatively affected by the pandemic. “Since my freshman year was online due to the pandemic, and my first semester on campus in the spring of 2021 was all about locking ourselves in our dorms, this past year has basically been my first full year of college where most clubs, classes, programs and activities are back in full swing. One of the funnest clubs I’ve been a part of this year was called Sisters on the Runway, a club dedicated to raising awareness for survivors of domestic violence, where we host an annual fashion show and donate proceeds to survivors.

“The most important thing I attended this year was called Umass Women Into Leadership, a very selective leadership program dedicated to women who want to pursue a career in public service. Throughout the program, we learn more about networking, salary negotiation, interviewing, writing a strong CV and much more These were weekly classes where we usually had a guest speaker including local politicians like the representative of the State Mindy Domb, or other women working for non-profit organizations or other government positions The program ended with a 3-day workshop where we networked with public sector professionals and private and attended guest addresses and panels on leadership and the work of government Our keynote speaker was Usha Pitts, U.S. Charge d’Affaires born in the Bahamas. We also had the opportunity to meet with former Boston Mayor Kim Janey where she gave a speech and did a Q&A with us over breakfast.

“After the fall semester, I will travel to Madrid, Spain, to do a semester abroad at the University of Nebrija, where I will continue to study Spanish from February to May. I have the intention to pursue a career in the foreign service, so in my senior year at UMass, I will likely be preparing to enroll in graduate school to further my education in foreign affairs.

“If it weren’t for the excellent education I received at Revere High School, I wouldn’t be where I am today. Mr. Kingston, Mr. Benner, Mr. Fellowes, Mr. Ciccarello, Mrs. Purkey and Mrs. Casper are just a few of the many teachers who have helped me navigate not only being a good student, but also a good friend. , teammate, leader, and the person – and due to the pandemic, I never got to thank them properly. My teachers were there for me and my hundreds of questions, worries, stories, and even the drama that came with being a teenager, scared and anxious to see what the world had in store for her. I am grateful for all the great opportunities and experiences.

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Meriden Schools Focus on Outreach, Curriculum and Culture https://gicarg.org/meriden-schools-focus-on-outreach-curriculum-and-culture/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 17:39:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/meriden-schools-focus-on-outreach-curriculum-and-culture/ MERIDEN — Lucrecia Zavala Magee experienced first-hand the struggles immigrants go through as they transition to a new culture when she moved to the United States at age 27. Over the next school year, through a new position at Meriden Public Schools, Zavala Magee will help students stay connected to their roots in an effort […]]]>

MERIDEN — Lucrecia Zavala Magee experienced first-hand the struggles immigrants go through as they transition to a new culture when she moved to the United States at age 27.

Over the next school year, through a new position at Meriden Public Schools, Zavala Magee will help students stay connected to their roots in an effort to ease their transition process.

Over 58% of Meriden Schools students identify as Latino. The school district is helping Latino students stay connected in the upcoming school year through language and history classes, parent involvement, and cultural events.

As a bilingual elementary school teacher in Meriden, Zavala Magee enjoys working with her students because she feels she can help create a connection between school, parents and the community.

This school year will bring him the opportunity to start a new role as a multilingual literacy coach, helping bilingual teachers in the classroom. She explained that elementary students learning a new language have a tough job trying to learn the content and the new language at the same time. Part of the goal is to help teachers facilitate students’ language transition.

Argentine-born Zavala Magee would also like to develop a bilingual curriculum so students can learn in both English and Spanish throughout fifth grade, she said.

The current program at Meriden begins teaching students to read and write in Spanish. The English language begins to be introduced gradually to students in kindergarten and first grade. In the second year, they switch completely to learning English, explained Zavala Magee.

Part of her job is to develop a connection with families. For Zavala Magee, it is important to show parents that teachers understand and are aware of their difficulties. She said she was proud of the work Meriden educators do to raise awareness of different cultures and help the immigrant community.

Awareness, curriculum, culture

Lysette Torres, director of equity and instruction for Meriden Public Schools, explained that one of the efforts the district is implementing is the Learner Engagement and Attendance Program (LEAP).

The program allows a team of educators, including Zavala Magee, to connect with students and families through home visits. The program seeks to provide support to students while emphasizing attendance.

The school system also provides training for educators focused on culturally and linguistically appropriate teaching. There are plans to launch two multilingual labs, a “safe space” in a classroom where students can go for support, Torres said.

Torres is aware of the need to reach American-born students with Latin roots. That’s why teaching the history of African American and Latin American history will be helpful, she said.

Joshua Orlinsky, head of the social studies department at Platt High School, will teach African American and Latin American history, a course that must be offered in all high schools in the state, Orlinsky said. He noted that students are not required to take the course and that between 50 and 55 students have signed up to take it at Platt. Orlinsky said he felt “honored” to be able to teach the class. He mentioned that learning about this type of history is meaningful for students because the course reflects an important component of the Meriden community.

Nadine Rosa, who also teaches at Platt, leads student projects and activities such as cultural exhibits to celebrate Hispanic heritage. She used to put up displays in her classroom, but three years ago she decided to start throwing a full-scale party. Exhibits are now school-wide and include student-selected Hispanic historical figures. Part of the celebration also includes a disc jockey playing Spanish music during lunchtime and a raffle of themed t-shirts, water bottles and books. Rosa’s goal is for students to take up the project in the future.

Anyone interested in donating funds for the celebration can contact Rosa at nadine.rosa@meridenk12.org.

ksantos@record-journal.com203-317-2364Twitter: @KarlaSantosNews

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CUSD Update: Higher Graduation Rate, Continuing to Increase Substitute Pay, District Meets Menstrual Fairness Act https://gicarg.org/cusd-update-higher-graduation-rate-continuing-to-increase-substitute-pay-district-meets-menstrual-fairness-act/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 17:05:21 +0000 https://gicarg.org/cusd-update-higher-graduation-rate-continuing-to-increase-substitute-pay-district-meets-menstrual-fairness-act/ School board administrators from the Coronado Unified School District met Thursday, August 25 at district offices where the board approved the continued increase in the daily rate of pay for substitute teachers, celebrated the opening of Village Preschool and adopted a new textbook for K-5 Spanish. program. But it was item 6.5, which included AB-367, […]]]>

School board administrators from the Coronado Unified School District met Thursday, August 25 at district offices where the board approved the continued increase in the daily rate of pay for substitute teachers, celebrated the opening of Village Preschool and adopted a new textbook for K-5 Spanish. program. But it was item 6.5, which included AB-367, the Menstrual Fairness Act, that caught the eye.

The law, which was passed by the state of California in October 2021, requires all public schools serving students in grades 6 through 12 to stock an adequate supply of free menstrual products in all women’s restrooms. This also includes toilets for all genders and at least men’s toilets. (See the full text of the law here). During the Student Services Report, it was shared that CUSD is now in compliance with this state requirement.

This did not sit well with some community members, who took issue with the requirement that at least a boy’s toilet be stocked with menstrual products. Jon Mosier, Coronado resident and CUSD dad, said following this law supports lies and could destroy students’ ability to reason.

“Everyone of us knows it’s ridiculous to provide menstrual products in men’s rooms. Why? Because everyone in that room knows that the physical differences between men and women are not trivial. Teach Differently is lying to students,” Mosier said.

Trustee Esther Valdes-Clayton said she disagrees with the law and it puts CUSD trustees in a difficult position. She pointed to the fact that the board does not ratify or vote on anything, but simply acknowledges compliance. Even so, Valdes-Clayton said the new requirement forces schools to comply with a “legal fiction” and puts them at the mercy of “period Nazis” who would likely file complaints if violated.

Administrator Whitney Antrim said anything the district can do to make students feel safe is important, especially after a middle school student took her own life last year.

“At our last meeting, we heard from community members who talked about not feeling safe at school,” Antrim said. “I’ve heard some people say they don’t know which bathroom to go to…. their physical safety was threatened. Anything we can do to make them feel safe and welcome…they have a champion here.

Superintendent Karl Mueller said CUSD’s responsibilities are to uphold the law and that the district is in full compliance with the law.

In other district news, Mueller shared that CAASPP testing data looks encouraging, with many school grades in the district at or above pre-pandemic levels. He was also upbeat about the AP test results. Additionally, he shared that the graduation rate in 2022 is 98.6% and the GA eligibility requirements for UC/CSU admissions have increased to over 71% from 64%. .

Superintendent Karl Mueller shared this “snapshot” of the first day of school at CUSD.

As for district enrollment, Mueller says 2,806 students are currently enrolled, 14% of which are inter-district transfers. (For reference, 3,032 students were enrolled in fall 2018.) He said the lower number this year was directly related to the number of interdistrict transfers accepted by the district; in 2018, they represented more than 18% of the population.

“Part of our strategic plan and our goals was to be very careful about rebuilding enrollment after the pandemic,” Mueller said. “We wanted to keep our class sizes below the target class size as stated in our collective agreement. We are rebuilding our enrollment to pre-pandemic levels without packing our classrooms to target class size.

Mueller said more information will be available in the fall in a full report from Dr. Megan Battle.

In other board business, the board approved continuing a temporary salary increase for certified substitutes for the 2022-23 school year. The salary increase, which was aimed at recruiting more substitute teachers, increased the certified salary to $200 per day and to $225 per day after ten days. Armando Farias, CUSD’s director of human resources, said he based the increase on research he had done on nearby districts and said some were paying $290 a day. The board also voted to increase the rate of pay for ranked alternates.

As for the long-term plan, Mueller shared a few updates: At the request of community members, a parent survey has been added to the California Healthy Kids survey. In addition, a staff survey is underway, focusing on employee satisfaction and well-being.

“You have very aggressive goals set here,” administrator Lee Pontes said of the long-term plan. “But that’s what the community wants, and that’s what they expect.”

In reports, Association of Coronado Teachers President Jennifer Landry featured in a slideshow three TK teachers who worked with CUSD’s youngest learners: Rachel Bevilacqua, Gina Mirtallo and Whitney Collier.

Earlier in the evening during council recognitions, Shane Schmeichel, Director of Special Programs, shared that thanks to the hard work and dedication of district employees, the instruction of CUSD’s “smallest learners” is well underway. on the Village campus. The site hosted its first-ever class of three-year-olds at Village Preschool many years ago.

“Due to the implementation of Universal TK, all employees at both sites, Crown and Silver Strand, and now newly licensed Village Preschool, worked tirelessly through late spring and early summer to pack and preparing for Crown’s move to Village,” Schmeichel said. “While packing, they also made sure to consider the academic and social development of our students and how our new programming would truly support the future development and growth of our youngest learners.”

Luke Johnson, President of the ASB at the CHS, was also present at the meeting to share his very first report. He shared that Strand Elementary started the school year with buses for all students and free breakfast for all, and welcomed a new Innovation Lab teacher. In addition, the popular Running Club will be back on campus. Village Elementary is kicking off the school year with free student-requested games and free lunch spots, and is excited to welcome field volunteers back, according to Johnson. Coronado Middle School welcomes new students with the “Trident Hangout”, which allows new students to meet friends. Coronado High School invited new students to explore the campus at “TikiFest” with student-led tours, and CHS students enjoy a renovated library with study rooms.

Johnson also shared that he, like many of his peers, appreciated the newly imposed later start time (CHS Period 1 now starts at 8:30 a.m.).

“A lot of students tend to spend late nights doing homework, and that extra 30 minutes of sleep is helpful,” Johnson said. “I think this will benefit all students at Coronado High School.”

In the learning department update, Dr. Battle shared that the district is adopting a new curriculum to support the world language curriculum at the elementary school level, which includes a new textbook for the K-5 curriculum. Spanish FLEX.

The Coronado Eagle-Journal was recognized for publishing and supporting the Islander Times student newspaper, which has been distributed as an insert to every Coronado home and business on a monthly basis since 2013. Mueller thanked Dean Eckenroth for helping the high school newspaper get such exposure.

“Dean not only fully covers the cost of printing and distributing our high school newspaper, but he has been a generous supporter of the district for many years through his family newspaper,” Mueller said.

Coronado Eagle-Journal editor Dean Eckenroth Jr, Mr. Tam Hoang and Superintendent Karl Mueller.

Mueller explained that the school newspaper, run by teacher Mr. Hoang, was no longer a club, but now a full-time journalism course that earns students credit as well as internships. Students learn about writing, editing, reporting, layout and design as well as the concepts of legal and ethical journalism. Mr. Hoang shared that Eckenroth is a dedicated benefactor who understands and respects students’ First Amendment rights, never requesting changes to editorial content.

The board also recognized the Emerald Keepers Club for their contributions. CHS club president Jesse Hill said club members were busy planting a garden using compost made from food scraps from Boney’s and local restaurants. They then donate the produce grown in these gardens to local San Diego families suffering from food poverty. Hill said she’s excited to see Emerald Keepers expanding across the district and helping CUSD be more sustainable.

Emerald Keepers Emily Kuite, Zoe Quast, Amy Steward and Jesse Hill pose with Superintendent Karl Mueller.

Earlier in the meeting during public comments, Arizona attorney Ryan Heath of Project Gavel said his nonprofit was personally suing every board member for the psychological torture of a student who didn’t did not comply with the mask regulations. Heath said the student was kicked out of school and sent to virtual learning every day, and was humiliated and mocked by her teachers.

“She wanted to go to class, she just wanted to breathe. Being a biological child shouldn’t be a crime,” Heath said. “The district called the police on her. They stuck her in the cold. They mistreated her, and it’s all your fault.

Also during public comments, community member Carolyn Rogerson spoke about the “Out for Safe Schools” program which she says could be adopted by the San Diego Unified School District. She said the program, which identifies safe spaces for LGBTQ+ students, could harm children’s mental, emotional and physical health. As part of the program, school staff would wear badges that identify them as trusted adults; Rogerson claimed the badges could ultimately encourage sexual predators.

“Unfortunately, we all know that schools have been plagued by predators in virtually every school county in this country,” Rogerson said. “It strikes me how happy hidden predators pretending to be protectors will be to receive a badge equivalent to a license to hunt.”

The public comment portion of the meeting can be viewed here.

The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors is scheduled for Thursday, September 15.

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‘Keep It Between Us’ Exposes the Worrying Epidemic of Grooming in US Schools https://gicarg.org/keep-it-between-us-exposes-the-worrying-epidemic-of-grooming-in-us-schools/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 03:00:32 +0000 https://gicarg.org/keep-it-between-us-exposes-the-worrying-epidemic-of-grooming-in-us-schools/ OWhen the heartbreaking revelations about Harvey Weinstein first broke in 2017, Cheryl Nichols, executive producer and subject of the Freeform docuseries keep it between us—remembers reading the cover in his living room. “The first thing I thought of,” she recently told The Daily Beast, “is what happened to me.” As depicted in the docuseries, Nichols […]]]>

OWhen the heartbreaking revelations about Harvey Weinstein first broke in 2017, Cheryl Nichols, executive producer and subject of the Freeform docuseries keep it between us—remembers reading the cover in his living room. “The first thing I thought of,” she recently told The Daily Beast, “is what happened to me.”

As depicted in the docuseries, Nichols grew up in a small town in Texas called Little Elm. She alleges her high school drama teacher’s husband groomed her as a teenager – a relationship that continued through her college years. Although Nichols knows her experience as a survivor of grooming and sexual abuse is not identical to that of Weinstein’s accusers, the national report hit her “as part of this larger issue of misogyny, patriarchy and abuse of power”. Seeing Weinstein’s accusers come forward prompted the filmmaker to start thinking about how she wanted to tell her own story.

Part personal story and part cultural exploration, keep it between us examines grooming and sexual abuse in the American school system. The series combines expert interviews, first-person accounts, and social media testimonials. In addition to Nichols, the second subject of the series is a young survivor named Heaven Rubin, who sued the Miami-Dade School Board over its response to her own allegedly inappropriate relationship with a teacher when she was 17. .

The docuseries premieres its first two installments August 29 on Freeform. The final two will follow on August 30, and all episodes will be available on Hulu 24 hours after they air. During a recent interview, Nichols explained how his idea for a feature-length documentary turned into something bigger.

“The more people we talked to, the more obvious it became that this was a huge issue and deserved more than an hour,” Nichols said. And so, the film became a four-part docuseries directed by Amy Berg (Phoenix rising), Jenna Rosher (Expensive…) and Kristi Jacobson (Lonely). Executive produced by Nichols.

“I wanted to make sure as many eyes as possible were on this,” Nichols said. “And I wanted to tell a story from my intimate perspective, because I felt like if I could be vulnerable and open, it would allow other women to relate to me in some way.”

The series finds Nichols interviewing former classmates, one of her high school teachers, and a best friend she pushed away as her allegedly inappropriate relationship with her drama teacher’s husband grew more intense. The project also helped Nichols realize how different each trauma survivor’s journey is. At first, she recalls, she devoted most of her attention to getting other women to come forward and talk about their experiences. Over time, however, she realized that didn’t always have to be the case.

“Some people don’t need to come forward to deal with [something like] that,” Nichols said. Realizing that, she added, “was kind of one of the biggest shifts and changes for me — and my ass has definitely gotten back to me about it.”

Instead of group testimony, the emotional power in keep it between us emerges when Nichols takes a seat on the other side of the figurative table.

In order to achieve the vulnerability Nichols sought, she knew she had to leave her comfort zone and “step into the subject role.” As one can imagine, this is no easy task for someone whose adult coping mechanisms tend to revolve around control.

“I had no idea how to anticipate how I was going to react emotionally,” Nichols said. “The real lows I would go through; which would really bring me joy in this process.

The filmmaker was determined to truly let go, even though it was nearly impossible to predict what that might mean. Yet Nichols also knew that part of what drove her was a desire to own her account of what happened between her and her teacher – which, at times, certainly made letting go even more so. hard.

keep it between us took almost five years to make. “So from start to finish [of the project]it’s like I’m a whole different person,” Nichols observed.

Part of this evolution takes place on screen. Among the most interesting interviews Nichols conducts are those with his former Spanish teacher, who used to call his so-called groomer a friend. Before the end of the final episode, Nichols finds himself questioning the Spanish teacher about the allegations against him.

I had a lot of realizations about why and how I choose to be true to friendships, especially friendships with older men, and especially friendships with older teachers.

“The dynamic between him and me definitely changed during the making of this documentary,” Nichols said. “I had a lot of realizations about why and how I choose to be true to friendships, especially friendships with older men, and especially friendships with older teachers.”

The producer’s development perspective is not the only shift in focus. Half way through keep it between us, we meet Heaven, who last year was awarded $6 million in damages in its sexual abuse case against the Miami-Dade School Board following allegations against former high school teacher Jason Meyers . (Heaven alleges that Meyers, her English teacher, abused her when she was 17. Although the state of Florida has brought criminal charges against Meyers, it has not been found guilty and denies all charges. allegations.) As Nichols observes in the docuseries, survivors’ paths to recovery can vary; as she processes her trauma through production, Heaven sought catharsis in court.

Before she starts working on keep it between us, Nichols had not encountered so many survivors. Making those connections, she said, deepened her understanding of her own experience. She recalled a conversation she shared with another grooming survivor and Be Lolita author Alisson Wood who changed his perspective on labels like ‘victim’ and ‘survivor’.

“I hated those words,” Nichols said. “I felt like they didn’t describe my experience or who I was. But throughout this process, I really started to identify with the word “victim” in a way that didn’t feel cheapened to me… Allison spoke about the word in a way that meant so much to me as something that happened to you. and not something you are. And I love that.

Blaming the victim and minimizing undue harm, such as keep it between us points out, are rooted in rape culture. During her own testimony, Heaven details how the school board tried to downplay what happened to her. For Nichols, the most damaging story Americans tell about teenage girls usually boils down to six words: “She knew what she was doing. »

“I think a lot of times we think teenage girls are young women. We don’t see them as children, that’s what they are,” Nichols said. “Growing up, all I heard was, ‘You’re so mature. You’re wise beyond your years. While that may have been true, there were people who used that as justification for me. take what they wanted and treat me as they wanted.

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