Gap year programs – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 11:45:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gicarg.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-105x105.png Gap year programs – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ 32 32 Op-Ed: Protect the Dreamers. America needs students like me to stay on our path to becoming doctors https://gicarg.org/op-ed-protect-the-dreamers-america-needs-students-like-me-to-stay-on-our-path-to-becoming-doctors/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 10:00:31 +0000 https://gicarg.org/op-ed-protect-the-dreamers-america-needs-students-like-me-to-stay-on-our-path-to-becoming-doctors/ I am a proud undocumented medical student attending UCLA medical school – a reality that still feels like a dream. It’s a reality thanks to the 2012 Deferred Action Policy for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. However, the DACA program and its beneficiaries remain at risk as the policy could be terminated by court order any […]]]>

I am a proud undocumented medical student attending UCLA medical school – a reality that still feels like a dream. It’s a reality thanks to the 2012 Deferred Action Policy for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. However, the DACA program and its beneficiaries remain at risk as the policy could be terminated by court order any day. Unless Congress passes legislation this year, nearly 700,000 DACA recipients — including teachers, parents, students and nurses — risk being forced out of the workforce and facing deportation.

I decided that I was going to pursue medical school in my third year at university. I hoped to become a doctor that people like my family could identify with and rely on – although, because of my immigration status, it was clear from the start that I might never be able to practice as a doctor. as a doctor in the United States. I made the decision to pursue a medical career despite this, because it is important to me that my community be represented in the field of health. I wasn’t discouraged by the fact that I didn’t know any undocumented medical students or undocumented medical practitioners. Living in constant uncertainty for as long as I can remember, I’ve had to develop a sense of resilience to overcome obstacles and continue to pursue my goals.

When DACA passed in 2012, I remember feeling excited and relieved, like a weight had been lifted from me. The policy provides temporary work permits and deportation protections to eligible young undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children.

The eviction protections gave me a sense of security so that I could continue to live in my hometown without fear of being suddenly uprooted. They allowed me to pursue medical studies.

Work authorization is also critical to the success of the policy, allowing DACA recipients to participate more fully in the workforce, support their families and enrich their communities. This opened the door for me to many opportunities for professional growth, including working in a high school as a college counselor, eligibility for scholarships, and access to other coveted clinical experiences and pre-medical programs. Although DACA was only a temporary solution, it has allowed me to become the doctor my community needs.

I will graduate in a year as an obstetrician and gynecologist. But as I yearn to celebrate my graduation, the program that gave me so many opportunities faces its greatest threat yet.

In July, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments from Texas against the United States, a case that challenges the legality of the DACA program, and a negative ruling is expected soon. The decision could end this year’s ability for current DACA recipients to renew their protections. This would mean that I and 110,000 other Dreamers who work in health care fields will not be able to use our specialized skills and degrees in the job market. In fact, if DACA ends, approximately 1,600 DACA recipients working in the healthcare sector would be forced out of their jobs every month for the next two years. It would be devastating for the US economy and for the patients across the country who rely on these workers.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that healthcare employment will grow 13% between 2021 and 2031. The United States is expected to experience a doctor shortage of up to 124,000 by 2034. This would profoundly affect communities in color, already underserved and receiving less -quality care than their white counterparts. Undocumented students who aspire to work in the medical field are equipped to fill this gap, with many having experienced the challenges of accessing health care themselves, but we may soon no longer be able to do so. The nation needs a permanent legislative solution.

If allowed to become a doctor and practice here in the United States, I will continue to fight health inequities and engage in research and mentorship to empower immigrant communities. My career would also provide me with the financial stability necessary to build my life in the United States — the only place I have ever known — allowing me, one day, to buy my first home and start a family. However, with the DACA program in jeopardy, my aspirations to give back to my community through health care and establish a future in the United States hang in the balance.

Congress has failed for decades to provide a permanent legislative solution to the Dreamers, using the existence of DACA as an excuse for inaction. However, the time is almost up; lawmakers must immediately enact permanent protections for Dreamers and affirm that they are part of the fabric of our country.

Yadira Bribiesca is a student at UCLA School of Medicine.

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Critical careers: pilot shortage crisis https://gicarg.org/critical-careers-pilot-shortage-crisis/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 03:41:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/critical-careers-pilot-shortage-crisis/ ROCHESTER, Minn. (KTTC) – These are turbulent times for the airline industry. There is a severe global shortage of airline pilots, and it affects us all. If you’ve traveled this summer and experienced flight delays or cancellations, chances are it’s due to a pilot shortage. This has an impact beyond those of us who travel […]]]>

ROCHESTER, Minn. (KTTC) – These are turbulent times for the airline industry. There is a severe global shortage of airline pilots, and it affects us all.

If you’ve traveled this summer and experienced flight delays or cancellations, chances are it’s due to a pilot shortage. This has an impact beyond those of us who travel by air. About $6.8 trillion worth of goods are transported by air freight every year, ranging from urgent medical equipment to perishables and other goods.

Andrew Hegland had a completely different career in mind. But in 2019 he started flying. He completed his RCTC aviation pilot program in February 2020, and now he is one of the instructors in the program. Pilots must have 1500 flight hours and significant training. Andrew completed the RCTC’s immersive program, gaining industry knowledge with hands-on lessons. And then, take flight with RCTC’s partner, Great Planes Aviation in Rochester.

Great Planes gets students off the ground with one-on-one flight lessons at its innovative facilities, including its own commercial pilot flight lab.

Kess Klouser is also a graduate of RCTC and Great Planes. “It’s a way for students new to flight training to familiarize themselves with procedures on the plane,” she says. We went for a short virtual flight over Rochester. She trusted me enough to take charge, and I didn’t do too much damage.

Kess fills a major gap in the airline industry. It projects worldwide that it will need 804,000 new civil aviation pilots, 769,000 new maintenance technicians and 914,000 new cabin crew members to fly and maintain the fleet over the next 20 years. .

Learn more about the RCTC Aviation Pilot Program and Great Planes Aviation in Rochester.

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DC will provide $10,000 to help families get out of homelessness https://gicarg.org/dc-will-provide-10000-to-help-families-get-out-of-homelessness/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 01:01:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/dc-will-provide-10000-to-help-families-get-out-of-homelessness/ The district will spend nearly $25 million to help 600 low-income families exit homelessness, including up to $10,000 in cash, Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) announced Monday. The pilot program, called the Career Mobility Act Plan, is for families coming out of homelessness but not in need of permanent housing vouchers. Bowser explained that some […]]]>

The district will spend nearly $25 million to help 600 low-income families exit homelessness, including up to $10,000 in cash, Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) announced Monday.

The pilot program, called the Career Mobility Act Plan, is for families coming out of homelessness but not in need of permanent housing vouchers. Bowser explained that some residents enrolled in government assistance programs face a dilemma when choosing jobs if their new earnings are less valuable than the benefits they received. She called it the “benefit cliff”.

“We’re creating a new program that helps fill that gap,” Bowser said. “We tell the families that we have your back, but we want you to continue earning, learning and growing, so you can manage all that these benefits have covered.”

The pilot project — available to families enrolled in DC’s Family Relocation Stabilization and Rapid Relocation programs — will be tailored to each resident’s career and family goals, Bowser said. Among the benefits available are rent and career support, up to $10,000 in cash, and a recurring $200 deposit into a savings account for each month a family pays their share of rent, a said Bowser. Assistance from the program will last for up to five years.

The city originally planned to help 300 families through the pilot project using $11.7 million in funds through the American Rescue Plan Act. It doubled that number after about 1,500 families applied to participate in the program, said Laura Zeilinger, director of DC’s Department of Social Services. All participants will be selected by lottery and the first 300 families will be registered before the end of the month; the second 300 will be entered next year using an additional $13.1 million that Bowser announced on Monday.

DC will provide $1,000 for school expenses to 15,000 families in need

Bowser said this effort will support the city’s progress in ending family homelessness in the district. The number of families in shelters has fallen by about 78% since 2016, thanks in part to the closure of the decrepit DC General shelter. Bowser made the announcement at the DHS Service Center at 1207 Taylor Street in Ward 4, which closed for renovations during the pandemic and is expected to reopen in a few weeks.

“This program is going to help our families in Ward 4. We know that 15% of our Black families and Latinx families here are below the poverty line,” said DC Council (D-Ward 4) member Janeese Lewis George. “And [the service center] will be a great resource for them. They will be able to come here and will not have to go downtown or anywhere else. We provide them with resources.

The pilot project marks the Bowser administration’s latest effort to provide families with direct cash payments, including a $1.5 million cash assistance program announced earlier this year for new and expectant mothers. from Wards 5, 7 and 8. And last month, Bowser said the city would provide 15,000 low-income families with one-time payments of $1,000 to help them get ready for the school year.

“We’ve developed so many different programs over the years that are surrounded by a lot of bureaucracy and hoops that aren’t effective and don’t necessarily help families move forward. And it has a lot to do with not trusting people…or that we think they have to prove they deserve help,” Bowser said of recent initiatives. “We believe money can make a difference…And we’ve also had – let’s be clear – over the last two years an injection of dollars that has allowed us to move forward in some of these ways.”

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Parent University Hosts Free Community Event with Service Providers https://gicarg.org/parent-university-hosts-free-community-event-with-service-providers/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 11:03:05 +0000 https://gicarg.org/parent-university-hosts-free-community-event-with-service-providers/ Parent University is back to offer parents and guardians a chance to learn and experience new skills, opportunities, and organizations available to help participants improve their quality of life. The free program is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at Ensley Elementary School, 501 E. Johnson Ave. Parent University is a non-profit organization […]]]>

Parent University is back to offer parents and guardians a chance to learn and experience new skills, opportunities, and organizations available to help participants improve their quality of life.

The free program is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at Ensley Elementary School, 501 E. Johnson Ave.

Parent University is a non-profit organization that helps bridge the gap between community and schools. Started by Michael O’Neal in Savannah, Georgia, it offers classes and events tailored to the individual needs of parents, providing food, transportation and childcare during in-person sessions to make it as convenient as possible for busy parents.

The parent university returns:Parent University is back for the second year. Never been? Here’s what you can learn:

Graduates:Graduates of Pensacola’s first parent college show inaugural year success

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An internship introduces students to private sector law https://gicarg.org/an-internship-introduces-students-to-private-sector-law/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 19:03:45 +0000 https://gicarg.org/an-internship-introduces-students-to-private-sector-law/ “In law, you first learn by watching rather than doing,” Joshua Wurtzel ’10 explained. He should know; the Binghamton University alumnus is a partner at the New York law firm Schlam Stone & Dolan, as well as a member of the steering committee of the Harpur Law Council. Opportunities to watch and learn aren’t plentiful […]]]>

“In law, you first learn by watching rather than doing,” Joshua Wurtzel ’10 explained.

He should know; the Binghamton University alumnus is a partner at the New York law firm Schlam Stone & Dolan, as well as a member of the steering committee of the Harpur Law Council.

Opportunities to watch and learn aren’t plentiful for practicing associates, which is why articling is essential for aspiring lawyers, especially when starting out. Launching in the summer of 2022, the Law Council’s new private sector articling program provides students with these essential experiences during their junior and senior years, and the opportunity to network and make connections.

Three interns were paired with Harpur College alumni at New York City businesses. Michelle Schoenwald, now a philosophy, politics and law (PPL) major, interned at Schlam Stone & Dolan, while political science major Kyle Lewis ’22 headed to EnTrust Global, where board member Bruce Kahne ’89 is the Global General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer.

Major PPL Roman Solano ’22 interned at InterPublic Group (IPG), an advertising company where board member Andrew Bonzani ’86 serves as executive vice president and general counsel. IPG also employs several other Binghamton alumni, including Paul Curley ’91, Vanessa Eng ’06, and Seth Litwack ’12.

During the 10-week internship, students engaged in a wide range of tasks and opportunities, ranging from observing court conferences, client meetings, team strategy calls and depositions, to communicating with the court about scheduling and other logistical matters, reviewing court documents, assisting paralegals and even interviewing people involved in cases.

“Until now, my life has been the University. But here the people I interacted with were paralegals and lawyers with so much experience and a different perspective,” Schoenwald said, adding that the internship helped her solidify her intentions to go to college. right.

Outside the comfort zone

Ex-lawyers often have their own internships in Binghamton to draw on; participating lawyers seek to provide similar experiences for the next generation of students.

Although now a civil litigator, Wurtzel articled with the Broome County Attorney’s Office while attending school in Binghamton. Today’s private sector internship program was not available at the time, but he would have appreciated the opportunity if it was, he said.

Law firms also benefit from hosting smart and enthusiastic students, and not just in terms of the work they provide. Prior to the official start of the private sector law internship program, Wurtzel hosted an intern from Binghamton last summer, who ended up working for the firm over the winter break and this summer as well.

Former interns can also be hired as paralegals once they graduate from Binghamton, as was the case with Solano, who currently works for Russo and Gould LLP, thanks to the connections he made during his internship.

When he arrived in Binghamton, Solano originally intended to become a doctor, but his interests changed. In first year, he knew he wanted to be a lawyer.

The internship was a first step towards achieving that goal, he said. At IPG, he learned not only the laws relating to advertising and marketing, but also the general skills of the professional world.

“I learned to step out of my comfort zone to do things I didn’t know before the internship and to network,” he said. “The program was very revealing and informative, and the people at IPG are great. They are ready to help you in any way they can during your internship, and even afterwards. I would recommend this internship to anyone pursuing a degree in law, marketing and advertising. »

Schoenwald plans to make the most of his senior year at Binghamton and take a year off before applying to law school. Although she has found that law requires a heavy load of research, writing and collaboration, it offers significant personal rewards, she said.

One of the company’s victories for which she was interned involved the release of a prisoner, she said.

“Today you might feel like you’re poring over legal papers, but tomorrow someone is going home to their family,” she said. “Nothing can compare to the real experience of being in the office and seeing what it’s like. It’s just very different from a classroom environment.

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Chicago schools are working to meet the needs of its struggling students https://gicarg.org/chicago-schools-are-working-to-meet-the-needs-of-its-struggling-students/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 11:19:39 +0000 https://gicarg.org/chicago-schools-are-working-to-meet-the-needs-of-its-struggling-students/ But some parents and students feel that their teachers or the school administration have not given them enough support during the pandemic. Yarbrough, South Side’s mother, wished she had had a more assertive response from her son’s school and teacher when she brought up his falling grades. “I didn’t feel like we were on the […]]]>

But some parents and students feel that their teachers or the school administration have not given them enough support during the pandemic.

Yarbrough, South Side’s mother, wished she had had a more assertive response from her son’s school and teacher when she brought up his falling grades. “I didn’t feel like we were on the same team,” Yarbrough said.

This led her to transfer Josiah in the fall of 2020 to St. John de la Salle Catholic Academy, where she saw him flourish. He has access to more after-school activities, she says, such as a Saturday STEM program, and is now a playground recreation monitor.

“There should always be something in place to deal with the socio-emotional side that was also taken away from them,” Yarbrough said. “And I saw that in St. John with Josiah there. I didn’t see that in CPS where my daughter stayed.”

This fall, her daughter, Jocelyn, a new fourth grader, will join her older brother in St. John.

Chicago public school enrollment continues to decline. Last October, a 3% drop from the previous year brought enrollment in the nation’s third district to 330,411 students, according to a 2021 CPS news release.

The district’s first-day attendance rebounded to roughly pre-pandemic levels, as 93.4% of registered students were in attendance for the first day of school Aug. 22, according to the district.

PATHWAYS TO CAREERS
“Let’s face it: we’ve seen a decline in enrollment over the past decade. We have under-enrolled schools,” CPS CEO Pedro Martinez said at a City Club of Chicago event in August. “I see this as an opportunity…an opportunity to create innovative school models.”

Martinez described one such potential model: a high school serving about 500 students that offers college credit toward an associate’s degree and is aligned with a career path, such as aviation or cybersecurity.

Strengthening existing CPS career path programs and creating new ones would create additional post-secondary opportunities, especially for its most disadvantaged students.

The We Will Chicago plan, launched in July by Mayor Lori Lightfoot, notes that “with about two-thirds of jobs in Illinois that would require at least post-secondary schooling or special training, formal education is a key predictor. an individual’s earning potential”.

Several programs that prepare individuals for gainful employment without having to complete a four-year degree already exist. Some partners with CPS and City Colleges of Chicago, and others are run by local businesses. There’s Aon’s two-year apprenticeship program, which has taken on more than 200 apprentices since 2017. Another is the ComEd Construct Infrastructure Academy, which graduated 69 participants in the spring. More than 70% of its graduates are placed in jobs and 95% of this year’s graduates were people of color, according to the program.

CPS and others are launching initiatives to fill academic gaps and rekindle engagement. The district’s $25 million tutoring program is more than three times the amount CPS spent on the initiative in the previous school year. The increased funding allows CPS’s tutoring corps program to expand to approximately 240 schools, with 760 tutors providing high-dose tutoring in reading and math.

A study from the University of Chicago Education Lab last year found promising results when ninth- and tenth-graders at CPS were given two-to-one math lessons every day for about 45 minutes. The tutoring model increased grades and reduced failure rates in math and non-math courses.

While rigorous tutoring and remediation is important, fostering an engaging environment for students is also essential.

Elaine Allensworth, Lewis-Sebring director of the Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, thinks schools and educators should also pay close attention to absenteeism and grades, which indicate engagement. “If a student doesn’t come to class, if they don’t get good grades, (then) they probably won’t get something they need,” she says.

In its 2023 budget, CPS increased its artistic and bilingual offerings and expanded its universal pre-K curriculum. More funding for after-school and summer programs is in the works. The district also increased the budget by $9 million for its Choose to Change program, which supports youth impacted by violence and trauma and struggling with absenteeism.

A concerted effort by the city, the public school system, community agencies, and families is imperative to prepare students to one day support themselves. But for some families, the stakes are too high to wait for systemic change to occur.

Now that the Yarbrough children are in private school, she says: “I feel like we’re planting a good seed and we’re on good ground right now. And I see what’s there. best for them.”

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Wilmington College notebook: Wingate Nets hat trick; 71st in ND program history | Sports https://gicarg.org/wilmington-college-notebook-wingate-nets-hat-trick-71st-in-nd-program-history-sports/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/wilmington-college-notebook-wingate-nets-hat-trick-71st-in-nd-program-history-sports/ Last Thursday night, reigning Female Athlete of the Decade Olivia Wingate helped the Notre Dame Women’s Soccer Team (5-0) defeat 22nd Wisconsin (2-1-2) 4-1. Wingate put on a show in the second half where she recorded her first career hat trick. It was the 71st hat-trick in program history, as Wingate now has a team-best […]]]>

Last Thursday night, reigning Female Athlete of the Decade Olivia Wingate helped the Notre Dame Women’s Soccer Team (5-0) defeat 22nd Wisconsin (2-1-2) 4-1.

Wingate put on a show in the second half where she recorded her first career hat trick. It was the 71st hat-trick in program history, as Wingate now has a team-best five goals.

In the 62nd minute, Wingate began their attacking dominance. It started with what was the first career assist for Waniya Hudson dropping a ball high for Wingate who brought it down then delivered it wide of the post for the goal.

Then exactly two minutes later on the dot, Van Zanten headed a ball past the Wisconsin defense as Wingate used his speed to go on a breakaway, then hit the goalie.

Same goes for Wingate’s third goal in the 86th minute, except this time it was Caroline Gray who headed a back ball past the defense as Wingate ran and put it away.

On Tuesday, Wingate was named ACC Offensive Player of the Week.

Elsewhere, the St. Thomas Aquinas College women’s soccer team wrapped up its three-game season-opening road trip, losing to the University of New Haven, 3-0, Saturday night at Kathy Zolad Stadium. . Freshman Kaitlyn Maguire paced the Spartans as she had four scoring chances, including three shots on goal. A defensive back, Maguire has played in all three games so far, registering four shots on goal.

Also, the University of Rhode Island earned its first win of the season on Sunday by beating Vermont 3-2. Junior midfielder Tess O’Connell scored two shots on goal. She has played 30 games so far in her career and is still looking for her first college goal. Last year, she led the entire team in shots with 20.

Additionally, Thea Aliberti is returning for another season at Colby-Sawyer. Last year, the midfielder was named captain. The team is 0-2-1 so far this season… Sophomore Hannah Watson returns to the Stonehill women’s team as a defensive midfielder/back. She played one game last year as a freshman… Junior Aly Colantuoni is back with Southern New Hampshire University. As a defensive back, she has appeared in one game so far and recorded one shot on net. Last year, she appeared in three games with two shots on goal… Two other former WHS players, second Tori Gemellaro and rookie Jenna Sweeney are members of the Bridgewater State team. Gemellaro is a keeper yet to see action, and Sweeney has played two games as a defensive midfielder/back… Amber Flynn helped RIT start 2-0. She started in defense in the team’s 3-0 win over Kenyon. Last year, as a freshman, she appeared in six games.

Finally, a total of 169 Bentley University student-athletes received 2021-22 Division 2 Athletics Director Association Academic Achievement Awards for their classroom success last school year. Among them was Wilmington resident Dana Goulet.

The 169 winners were the most of any institution in the Northeast-10 Conference and Eastern Region, as well as tied for the 13th-highest total nationally. Putting that into perspective, there are over 300 Division II institutions across the country.

Requirements to receive an academic achievement award include a GPA of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale, completing at least two years of college-level work, and being an active member of a team intercollegiate in the 2021-22 academic year.

MEN’S FOOTBALL

Babak Bakhtiari is a second striker for the Endicott men’s football team. Prior to college, he was a star player at Central Catholic High School.

SOCCER

The Curry College football team lost 35-20 to Massachusetts Institute of Technology in its season opener Friday night in non-conference action at Walter M. Katz Field.

MIT scored the only touchdown of the third quarter and again just 38 seconds into the fourth to take a decisive 35-13 advantage, but Curry fought on until the final whistle. At the end of a 12-game practice that sucked eight minutes down, junior Bailey Smith forced and recovered a fumble, knocking him back 87 yards before being dragged just three yards from the end zone, which set up a touchdown to close the gap to 35-20. Smith finished the game with ten tackles, including six solo, out of the defensive back position.

Also on the Curry team but didn’t play in the opener is freshman Pedro Germano, who was the WHS team’s QB the past two seasons.

Elsewhere, the Merrimack College football team was beaten by Holy Cross, 31-17. Tight End Tyler Roberts had two receptions for 23 yards in the loss. Senior captain, Roberts is coming off a career year with 52 receptions for 538 yards and six touchdowns… Tyler’s brother, Shane Roberts, is a sophomore at Nichols College and he had six tackles in the thrilling 30-29 victory of the team against Westfield State on Friday. .

Elsewhere, freshman Jake Chirichiello is a member of Franklin Pierce’s team, which opened the season Saturday with a 10-7 loss to Edinboro… Dean Nally is back at Bentley University, who dropped out the season opener at West Chester, 17-16. A junior, Nally appeared in six games last year… Christian Robarge is back at Western New England and Dustin Burkle, a Wilmington resident who played at Woburn High, is a senior at Bridgewater. Running back, he did not play the team’s first game… Finally, Chris Walsh is back at the University of Albany as a lineman.

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Former Town Crier Female Athlete of the Year, Emily Hill, is back with the Colby-Sawyer women’s tennis team. On Saturday, in the team’s season opener, playing third place singles, she was beaten by Ashley Keaveney of Endicott in straight sets, 6-3, 6-3.

Last year, as a junior transfer from Johnson and Wales, Hill ranked No. 2 in singles for the Chargers in addition to being No. 1 in doubles. She finished the season 12-4 in singles with an 11-2 record in second place, while finishing 12-8 in doubles. Hill finished a perfect 8-0 match in GNAC with a 4-0 record in singles and doubles.

FIELD HOCKEY

Graduate student Jillian Miele, a reigning All-American selection, scored a goal to help Johnson & Wales defeat Salve Regina, 3-0, and move to 2-0 in the young season. The goal came after the team’s 2-1 season-opening win over Eastern Connecticut University. In that win, Miele scored the game-winning goal early in the second quarter.

Last year, Miele set the program record for most points at 146, and also set single-season program records for most goals (26), assists (14) and points. (66). She was named GNAC Offensive Player of the Year, was awarded to the All-GNAC First Team, and was selected to both the Division 3 All-Region First Team and the National Division 3 Senior Team. .

She also holds the record for most points in a career at WHS.

Elsewhere, junior Jocelyn White is a goalkeeper for the Regis College team. She didn’t play in the team’s season-opening loss this week, but last year she appeared in all 13 games, playing every second. She finished with 104 saves and a 3.92 GAA.

VOLLEYBALL

Worcester State Volleyball fell to Roger Williams 3-0 (25-22, 25-21, 25-19) and Brandeis 3-0 (25-17, 25-17, 25-15) in a tri-match held this past weekend. Maeve Cadogan played in three of the sets and recorded an ace, as well as two blocks. A junior intermediate blocker, she played in 27 games last year as a sophomore and finished with 93 kills.

CROSS COUNTRY

Sean Riley is a member of the UMass-Lowell men’s team, Patrick O’Mahony dresses at Bryant University and on the women’s side, Shea Cushing is a member of UVM.

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To Alaska and beyond | 34th Street Magazine https://gicarg.org/to-alaska-and-beyond-34th-street-magazine/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 00:31:51 +0000 https://gicarg.org/to-alaska-and-beyond-34th-street-magazine/ For James Chang (C ’22, Law ’26), an English literature major and enthusiast, there probably aren’t many things that are “hard to define.” A graduate of both the Creative Writing Concentration and the College’s PPE major, he’s pretty much a wordsmith extraordinaire. When it comes to describing the former Penn Review editor, however, I struggle […]]]>

For James Chang (C ’22, Law ’26), an English literature major and enthusiast, there probably aren’t many things that are “hard to define.” A graduate of both the Creative Writing Concentration and the College’s PPE major, he’s pretty much a wordsmith extraordinaire. When it comes to describing the former Penn Review editor, however, I struggle to sum up the James Chang I just met. In conversation, he is extremely articulate, soft-spoken and thoughtful, perhaps because he cut his teeth in the notoriously intense debating circuit of New York prep school.

At Penn, James double majored in English and PPE, interned at the Department of Justice with the Penn program in Washington, and participated in sociological research on what laughter says about us as beings. humans according to Freud and field research in South America. Now he’s well on his way (after a year off) to becoming a Carey-Law Juris Doctor. Despite all his accomplishments in various fields, it makes sense that he would be happy to have also studied PPE “because it gave [him] a very broad understanding of philosophy, sociology, politics and economics, but English is [his] true love all the way back.

At Penn, James found a community not only in the English department itself, but also in his beloved Kelly Writers House, the campus literati center. “Having a little private center for creative writers is something that I really enjoyed, because I was really into creative writing. I was really into it, I did my literary diary at my school, so Penn’s Kelly Writers House program really appealed to me. [in],” he explains. The first club he joined on campus was the Penn Review, an all-student-run literary magazine that publishes three annual issues of poetry, fiction, and art. After rising through the ranks, he was eventually named editor in his senior year.

With a constantly rotating staff, the magazine’s culture often changes, and once James had the chance to put his stamp on the Penn Review, he did so with zeal. “I was really focused on making the magazine an inclusive place for freshmen and future sophomores, especially after this COVID year, so we focused a lot on membership,” says- he. “We focused on organisation, and… the club got a bit closer after that.”

James’ passion for equity and inclusion took on new meaning in 2020, when he traveled to Washington for a semester with the Penn in Washington program. He interned at the Justice Department in the Civil Rights Division, monitoring the Super Tuesday election in Harris County. Working with a county notorious for its discrimination in voter accessibility prompted him to continue to seek positions in this area. “I also did an internship at [Equal Employment Opportunity Commission], which listens to calls from people who believe they have been racially and sexually harassed,” he says. “It cemented my desire to apply to law school. I liked this area and having the vocabulary to deal with these issues.

Now, with a law school acceptance in the bag, James is taking a year to wander around and look into new experiences before returning to Philadelphia for another three years. If there is a lot to be said about all this consummate “doing” that school, clubs and work give birth to in us, nothing can make us forget the richness of the adventure to be lived by opening up to the outside world. .

That spirit led James to alaskajobfinder.com and led two-month whale watching tours off an Alaskan island.

You read correctly. If you were one of the lucky ones who sailed Alaskan waters last summer, chances are you had future attorney James Chang as your attendant. When asked “Why Alaska?” the first of a host of questions hoping to get to the bottom of what got James to this point, he responds with a simple “Why not?” »

This takes care of all the follow-up questions: why not, indeed? Of course, he could discuss in more detail why he would be inclined to become an Alaskan seaman, leaving behind the familiar world of the East Coast comfort class to live in a three-way shipping container. hours from the mainland (by boat) with an ex-criminal, and why he would stay after three workers broke their bones and one had to be airlifted to Juneau. But the better question, and perhaps the only answer, is “Why not?”

James lived on an island of less than a thousand people, immersed in the legendary and awe-inspiring culture of the native Tlingit tribe and the inner and outer contours of Alaskan whales. “It was something I just wanted to get into and see if I could survive. The air is so pure and totally untouched there, so that’s something I’m really going to miss – how untouched everything was. Admittedly, it seems like the experience was a breath of fresh air in every way.

James hopes to continue his travels and explore Japan, a full 180° from the remote shores of Alaska but an adventure nonetheless. Ultimately, James is best described through his travels, whether he travels back in time to analyze modernist literature, across the country to observe the functions of democracy from a new perspective, or across the table at the Kelly Writers House to experience the artistic musings of countless writers of all ages.

Traveling in any direction allows the writer to lose themselves entirely in a world of their own creation, just as creative writing – James’s first love – does. It’s all out there, dozens of people we’ve never met, cultures we’ve never known, oceans we’ve never seen, just beyond the force field bubbles of our comfort zones and our safe spaces.

If James’ exploration has taught us anything, the only question to ask is, “Why not?”

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Molly Higgins, executive vice president of community affairs and engagement for the Los Angeles Rams https://gicarg.org/molly-higgins-executive-vice-president-of-community-affairs-and-engagement-for-the-los-angeles-rams/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 15:51:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/molly-higgins-executive-vice-president-of-community-affairs-and-engagement-for-the-los-angeles-rams/ Since winning the Super Bowl in February, have things changed for you in your role? If so, how? We really feel the enthusiasm. The requests are hot and heavy, whether it’s player appearances, cheerleaders or mascots, autographs, community partnerships, and more. I always tell my team – and Kevin shares this sentiment as well – […]]]>

Since winning the Super Bowl in February, have things changed for you in your role? If so, how?

We really feel the enthusiasm. The requests are hot and heavy, whether it’s player appearances, cheerleaders or mascots, autographs, community partnerships, and more. I always tell my team – and Kevin shares this sentiment as well – to grow humbly and not change. We’re the same organization we were before we won the Super Bowl. We just want to take it all in stride.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job?

The need in our community. There are so many needs, and when you’re in the community to meet these people and hear their stories, it’s hard because I want to say ‘yes’ to everything. I want to change the world. I know the problem with that is that if you try to be everything to everyone, it really dilutes your impact. This, to me, becomes transactional rather than transformative philanthropy. You really have to resist that urge, and sometimes you can be creative in how you help. We may not take a big initiative with an organization, but we will try to take care of them with an autographed item that they can fundraise with. It’s hard. You never want to just show up for a quick appearance; you want to create a lasting relationship, and I think we’ve done a really good job of establishing those priority pillars. Most of them center around social justice and things that disproportionately impact our communities of color, including food insecurity, housing insecurity/homelessness, education inequity, community-police relations and mentoring. We do a ton of mentorship with kids, especially in under-resourced communities. Mentoring is really important to us.

Speaking of mentors, do you have any who have helped you in your career?

I’ve had so many – many of whom know they’re a mentor of mine and many of whom don’t know I appoint them as a mentor. I think it comes down to the fact that I’m constantly trying to learn, and at the Rams we have some of the brightest and most innovative people, and I’m learning from them. I think you can find a mentor in so many different places. For me, I have a lot of mentors that I meet in the community. There is so much wisdom and life experience that I learn in Inglewood and Watts in South Los Angeles. It helps me become a better human relations professional, a better human being, a more empathetic and passionate person. And it helps me better understand the issues that our community is facing.

What advice do you have for women looking to start a career in the industry?

I’m often asked this question, and I’ve been blessed to be surrounded by people who saw the value in me as a human being, not just as a woman. I understand that this is not the case for everyone. But I think we’re in a really exciting time in sports where people are starting to really value diverse opinions, life experiences and perspectives, and that’s certainly the case with women. There are so many opportunities ahead of us.

Dating back to St. Louis when we built our management team, for several years I was the only female on the management team. Fast forward to now, there are five women on our leadership team. Beyond that, there are a number of female heads of departments. We see doors opening, and with the leaders we have at the Rams, I think people really appreciate our contribution and what we women bring to the table.

I was fortunate to be part of an organization that values ​​and prioritizes diversity and inclusion. If I give any advice to a young woman, it would be to find a forward-thinking organization that won’t put limits on you. If you are in an organization that supports you, the sky is the limit. But you still have to find the right organization.

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Jamin Davis is progressing. Commanders need it to keep going. https://gicarg.org/jamin-davis-is-progressing-commanders-need-it-to-keep-going/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 21:22:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/jamin-davis-is-progressing-commanders-need-it-to-keep-going/ Comment this story Comment Late in the second quarter of the Washington Commanders’ second preseason game against the Kansas City Chiefs, linebacker Jamin Davis saw a play before it happened. The Chiefs tried to fool the defense by moving a wide receiver from left to right and faking a throw sweep transfer – the exact […]]]>

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Late in the second quarter of the Washington Commanders’ second preseason game against the Kansas City Chiefs, linebacker Jamin Davis saw a play before it happened. The Chiefs tried to fool the defense by moving a wide receiver from left to right and faking a throw sweep transfer – the exact type of eye candy that, in the past, could have sown just enough doubt in the game. Davis’ mind to make him distrust his reading. He could have wavered or even taken a step toward sweeping the jets, wasting the milliseconds and fractions of space that separate success and failure in the NFL.

But this time, Davis recognized the deception and dove into his gap at the line of scrimmage, where he met running back Isiah Pacheco and dropped him for a minimal gain.

While the pre-season is an inherently flawed sample and despite not making a lot of splatter plays, Davis feels like he’s had enough good reads and quick reactions to help shake off the frustrations. of what he called a “humiliating” rookie year. He begins to recognize himself on tape again.

“It’s Jamin Davis,” he said of the game against the Chiefs. “You want to get there consistently and make that your foundation, who you are as a player, rather than, ‘Oh, he shows flashes or who he can be as a player.’ F— that. That’s me. . . . That’s literally me. [I’m] just go there to be more comfortable, and [I’m] play ball, bro. I didn’t go this far for nothing. That’s just how I think right now.”

One of the reasons Davis has felt more comfortable is his new role in the defensive scheme. During his rookie year, Kentucky’s first-round pick didn’t have an offseason schedule and struggled to master the difficult role of middle linebacker, which often slowed him down and led to a role lower in the second half of the season.

This offseason, Washington moved Cole Holcomb into the role of Mike and Davis off the ball, which eases his responsibilities and should help his brain unlock his body. Davis still possesses remarkable athletic talents. He ran the 40-yard dash in 4.48 seconds, jumped 42 inches vertically and has a wingspan of 79⅞ inches, all 95th percentile measurements or higher for a linebacker, according to mockdraftable.com.

If Davis can keep his game quicker and freer, it would be a big boost for a defense trying to bounce back from a disappointing 2021, specifically covering opposing tight ends and running backs.

Running backs JD McKissic, who is sometimes covered by Davis in practice, complimented his performance in camp: “He likes a totally different player.”

“He’s playing with more certainty and more confidence,” defensive coordinator Jack Del Rio said of Davis. “When he’s mentally locked down and really understands where he belongs, he’s able to come to life. … We’re going to need him to play well.

In Carson Wentz, commanders are confident they’ve found the one

Davis’ growth and consistency goes beyond box scoring. On a running play in Washington’s preseason opener against Carolina, Davis encountered a header blocker in space and forced the fullback to bounce outside, where a teammate awaited an easy tackle. . These subtle plays often go unnoticed but help the defense maintain structural integrity while avoiding explosive plays.

For a player like Davis — who was just a one-year starter in college — the low-stakes reps he took this spring and summer were crucial in his ability to feel the game slowing down. And as he became more consistent, his teammates began to trust him more.

Last year, Holcomb said, Davis was sometimes hesitant to speak before the snap because he lacked confidence in his reading or because if he changed his defense his mission would also change, forcing him to reflect. to a new responsibility. This year, Davis has been more confident.

“I’m proud of where Jamin is,” Holcomb said. “He gives me a lot of confidence. I don’t have to worry about him. I don’t have to think about him. He’s out there and he knows what he’s doing.

When Commanders coach Ron Rivera talks about Davis, he often goes back to a Week 3 playoff last season at the Buffalo Bills. On the fourth and second, Davis read running back Devin Singletary executing a route out of the backfield and into the flat. Davis broke on the pitch and arrived at Singletary around the same time as the ball; he threw Singletary back to stop the conversion.

This piece, Rivera noted, was in men’s coverage. If the COs let Davis use his natural skills more, he could become the player they dreamed of when they selected him 19th overall.

Davis said he heard criticism from fans who thought he was a bust or a waste of a first-round pick. He is motivated by them and says, “Let them keep talking like crazy.” But he sees himself on tape, and he wants everyone to see him too. His game this pre-season has given him confidence.

“Now,” he said, “it’s like, ‘Okay, let’s show the world who I really am as a player.’ ”

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