Gap year programs – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 19:00:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://gicarg.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-105x105.png Gap year programs – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ 32 32 Muma College of Business, TGH partner on a new innovative institute for people development https://gicarg.org/muma-college-of-business-tgh-partner-on-a-new-innovative-institute-for-people-development/ https://gicarg.org/muma-college-of-business-tgh-partner-on-a-new-innovative-institute-for-people-development/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 17:42:17 +0000 https://gicarg.org/muma-college-of-business-tgh-partner-on-a-new-innovative-institute-for-people-development/ USF’s Muma College of Business and Tampa General Hospital today announced the launch of a groundbreaking initiative to provide essential people skills to hospital staff, from senior surgeons to valets. Drawing on USF’s expertise, the all-new People Development Institute is designed to deliver courses that provide not only TGH employees, but also hospital partners, suppliers […]]]>

USF’s Muma College of Business and Tampa General Hospital today announced the launch of a groundbreaking initiative to provide essential people skills to hospital staff, from senior surgeons to valets.

Drawing on USF’s expertise, the all-new People Development Institute is designed to deliver courses that provide not only TGH employees, but also hospital partners, suppliers and associates, the tools they have. need to create better relationships with patients, clients and the medical community. Nearly 90% of executives say there is a skills gap in the workplace, according to a McKinsey global survey, and the institute is a new way to tackle those challenges.

While medical programs are excellent at imparting vital knowledge to medical personnel, essential human skills tend to receive much less attention in targeted medical programs. The ambitious professional development undertaken as part of a collaborative initiative intends to fill this gap.

The all-new People Development Institute awards Credly badges without credit. Credly badges recognize digital learning that focuses on the technical and soft skills needed for an organization to thrive. Professors at Muma College of Business play a leading role in the design, creation and delivery of the courses.

“For years, the University of South Florida and Tampa General Hospital have partnered in healthcare, saving lives, training healthcare providers and together creating innovative new systems,” said Rhea Law, President of USF. “The partnership between Tampa General and USF Health has strengthened the university academically and enhanced our role in the Tampa Bay area.

“Such collaboration is in the DNA of both organizations – and it is vital to maintaining healthy communities. The synergies between USF and Tampa General have been so positive that we kept asking ourselves: how can we work together otherwise? How else can we take advantage of each other’s strengths?

“As a result,” she said, “our new partnership is in business, and we couldn’t be more proud to be a part of this company.”

The initiative is designed to make healthcare workers better employees while keeping them engaged through educational opportunities offered by hospital leaders and university teachers.

“The vision of Tampa General Hospital is to be America’s safest and most innovative academic healthcare system that requires the best training and development for our healthcare professionals,” said John Couris, president and CEO of Tampa General Hospital. “This unique collaboration between TGH and USF Muma College of Business will meet these needs and have a direct impact on the professional growth of each member of our team. ”

Couris said the hospital foundation committed $ 5 million for the institute’s first five years.

With the goal of developing a one-stop-shop for all people-centered training needs at TGH initially, said Matt Mullarkey, a faculty member at Muma College of Business who led the effort, the initiative hopes to someday provide access to all health care. industry.

Training will be offered virtually with expansion plans in a variety of formats including virtual, hybrid and face-to-face instruction. Classes are free for all members of the TGH team. Tampa General will cover the cost of all training materials required for the courses and the TGH Foundation has committed to fully fund the institute for its first five years.

“Florida is quickly becoming one of the largest concentrations of healthcare professionals in the country,” Mullarkey said. “Working with Tampa General Hospital, USF Muma College of Business is delighted to co-design, co-create and co-deliver the most innovative people development courses in healthcare aimed at all professionals, from the valet to the vascular surgeon and from the administrative clerk to the cardiologist. nurse graduated in care.

“We couldn’t be more excited and proud to partner with the team at Tampa General Hospital to make this vision a reality. ”

The institute is a collaboration between the two organizations to identify the specific, non-clinical training needs of TGH employees, ranging from transport staff to surgeons. The idea is to keep employees trained so that they can use their relationship skills to improve the patient experience and grow professionally.

“The institute is an investment in our most important asset, our team members,” said Rico Ruiz, director of organizational development and co-director of the People Development Institute. “If we ask our team members to behave and act differently, we have to teach them to behave and act differently. This unique and comprehensive People Development Institute will allow us to leverage the expertise of our partners at USF Muma College of Business to set the industry standard for how we develop the skills of all of our members. ‘team. The Institute will support their professional aspirations and provide them with the behaviors, knowledge and skills necessary to drive their holistic development so that as an organization we can achieve TGH’s vision to be the most safe and the most innovative in America.

The training and programs offered by the institute will help TGH employees become more marketable and acquire new skills that will be useful in the future. Classes begin this year and run until 2025, according to the agreement signed on March 30.

The program also includes the skills required by administrators. For example, it offers training on leadership, motivation, and the use of analytics to capitalize on employee data to personalize programs such as onboarding and wellness campaigns. This can improve employee morale and retention.

The collaboration is part of Muma College of Business’s strategic plan to engage with the external business community.

“It is often said that you are judged by the company you keep,” said Moez Limayem, Lynn Pippenger Dean of Muma College of Business, “and we couldn’t have chosen a better partner to collaborate with on this project than Tampa General Hospital. , a premier health care provider in the country.

“This revolutionary collaboration should serve as a model for partnerships between higher education and the medical industry,” he said. “It is unique and will strengthen the operational skills of those who manage our health and care for us whenever the need arises.

“USF continues to prove its worth time and time again as a resource to our community,” Limayem said. “We plan to maintain and strengthen this partnership for years to come. ”


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Can mentoring help more black Britons get board jobs? https://gicarg.org/can-mentoring-help-more-black-britons-get-board-jobs/ https://gicarg.org/can-mentoring-help-more-black-britons-get-board-jobs/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 12:18:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/can-mentoring-help-more-black-britons-get-board-jobs/ Blacks are under-represented in leadership positions in Britain’s private sector, with none of them occupying the top three ranks of a company listed on the FTSE 100 last year. Can Mentoring and Internship Initiatives Help Close the Gap? * Black Britons are under-represented in top corporate positions * Lack of role models, contacts hamper career […]]]>

Blacks are under-represented in leadership positions in Britain’s private sector, with none of them occupying the top three ranks of a company listed on the FTSE 100 last year. Can Mentoring and Internship Initiatives Help Close the Gap?

* Black Britons are under-represented in top corporate positions

* Lack of role models, contacts hamper career progression

* Mentoring, internship programs aim to bridge the gap

By Sonia Elks

LONDON, October 11 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – As a black teenager growing up in south London, Kofi Siaw had a problem – he dreamed of a high-flying career as a city professional, but didn’t no contact and few role models to help him get there.

Frustrated to see young black men portrayed in the media primarily in connection with crime, Siaw wanted to show young people like him that they could aspire to break into white-dominated fields – and reach the top positions as well.

Working with the Urban Synergy Youth Mentorship Program, he helped organize a series of events featuring black professionals. Even for him, the meetings were a revelation. “I remember back then being surprised to see a black pilot. I was like, brah, are there black people who fly planes?” Said Siaw, who is now 29 and works as a senior partner. at the audit firm EY.

“That’s when it got me thinking ‘I have to think beyond Deptford’,” he said, referring to the inner city area where he grew up.

Blacks make up around 3% of the population of England and Wales, but only occupy 1.5% of managerial positions in the private sector, according to an analysis released last year by Business in the Community , a charity.

No black was in a top-three position at a company listed on the FTSE 100 stock index last year, according to a report by recruiting firm Green Park.

“You have a lot of obstacles to overcome,” said Warren Wellington, co-founder and chairman of the Black British City Group for professionals working in the City of London.

Those who manage to break into prestigious white-dominated industries may find their progress hampered by a lack of representation and mentorship, as well as often subtle but persistent negative stereotypes about race, he said.

“If racism robs you of an opportunity or a chance to improve yourself, then that’s really a problem for me,” he added.

Mentoring

With little sign of increasing black representation on UK boards, the mentoring and internship programs offer practical steps to help black youth and entrepreneurs develop their skills and find opportunities.

Among the most ambitious are the 10,000 Black Interns, which were launched last year with an initial commitment to place 100 young people and which has rapidly grown to encompass more than 700 companies in 24 industries.

Of the more than 500 interns placed so far, around 30% have been offered a job or extended internship, said co-founder Dawid Konotey-Ahulu.

“All of the founders found that our WhatsApp or LinkedIn is literally exploding every day with people just saying ‘this is amazing and it was a game changer for me’,” he added.

Many of those who have launched such initiatives have said that they have been driven to act by their own struggles to build a career path.

“As a young black person myself, I remember when I was their age and didn’t have a mentor,” said David Wurie of Bright Exchange, a working nonprofit mentorship and internship program. with 15 to 19 year olds. years.

“I wanted to give back based on what I missed.”

The lack of black senior executives in many large companies means that they are often seen as “inaccessible” and not to them by young black people, he said, while companies themselves are generally unaware that they are have this picture.

Mentoring organizations said that despite companies’ commitment to improving diversity, they should do more to actively reach out to minority and underrepresented groups.

However, the growing investor interest in environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) programs helps provide essential funding, said Akil Benjamin, who leads the Mentor Black Business program for entrepreneurs of all ages.

“I know that I am fulfilling and fulfilling a large part of the ESG commitments of multinational organizations,” he said.

“There is a market need for me now… Without this market imperative, I don’t think that many of these programs would be funded or executed.”

‘UNEVEN PLAYGROUND’

While mentoring initiatives aim to help individuals gain a foot in the door, some activists are calling for more transparency on salaries and progression.

“If there were a level playing field there would be a lot more black, Asian and ethnic minorities at the top because we are as smart as whites,” said Dianne Greyson, founder of the Ethnicity Pay Gap Campaign .

“You are structurally putting challenges in the way of people so that they are not promoted.”

The campaign follows companies that voluntarily share their ethnic pay gap and also calls on the government to force companies to share the data.

“It’s more than a financial issue, it’s a human rights issue. Everyone should be treated fairly,” said Greyson.

Related stories:

Is Britain’s Social Insurance Hike Unfair to Black and Asian Workers?

Young, jobless and black: British minorities are paying the price for the pandemic

“COVID is a red flag”: black entrepreneurs aim to level the playing field

(Reporting by Sonia Elks @soniaelks; Editing by Helen Popper. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, which covers the lives of people around the world who struggle to live freely or fairly. Visit http: // news .trust.org)

We want to hear from you: What critical stories and perspectives are missing from our coverage of systemic racism around the world?

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Community Perspective: Virginia Tobacco Commission Changes to Meet Community Needs | Chroniclers https://gicarg.org/community-perspective-virginia-tobacco-commission-changes-to-meet-community-needs-chroniclers/ https://gicarg.org/community-perspective-virginia-tobacco-commission-changes-to-meet-community-needs-chroniclers/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/community-perspective-virginia-tobacco-commission-changes-to-meet-community-needs-chroniclers/ The past year has been difficult for all of us in various ways and while we have had to adapt and change, so have our local businesses and local economies. The coronavirus epidemic has put a tremendous amount of stress on our business community as we have all been forced to stay at home to […]]]>

The past year has been difficult for all of us in various ways and while we have had to adapt and change, so have our local businesses and local economies.

The coronavirus epidemic has put a tremendous amount of stress on our business community as we have all been forced to stay at home to stay safe but luckily it looks like we have finally turned a corner and better days are upon us. future. This seems like a good time to reflect on how the Virginia Tobacco Commission has supported our businesses and our communities and how it will continue to do so as we all work to recover from what has been a difficult time.

As the needs of our communities have changed, the commission has also changed and we continue to seek innovative ways to attract the best professionals and employers to the region. Most recently, with the introduction of our talent attraction program and our business and community loan program.

Over the past 20 years, the board is probably best known for helping attract top employers to Southern and Southwestern Virginia through our traditional grant programs. These include companies you know well like Microsoft, Tempur / Sealy, Morgan Olson, Aldi and many more, as well as hundreds of other companies that have created over 26,000 jobs and $ 4.3 billion. dollars of investment in the regions we serve. The commission did this through grants which, over time, depleted the funds available to continue attracting new businesses. To counter this and to ensure that the commission remains viable over the long term, we are adding a new tool to our toolkit: our community and business loan program.


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Post-graduation careers jeopardized by three-semester plan – The Oberlin Review https://gicarg.org/post-graduation-careers-jeopardized-by-three-semester-plan-the-oberlin-review/ https://gicarg.org/post-graduation-careers-jeopardized-by-three-semester-plan-the-oberlin-review/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 20:59:52 +0000 https://gicarg.org/post-graduation-careers-jeopardized-by-three-semester-plan-the-oberlin-review/ When COVID-19 first sent students home in March 2020, I was devastated. Although it took me a while to feel at home in Oberlin, by my second year I had grown to love college. There was nowhere else that I would rather be. Now, as a fourth year, that feeling seems beyond foreign. I envy […]]]>

When COVID-19 first sent students home in March 2020, I was devastated. Although it took me a while to feel at home in Oberlin, by my second year I had grown to love college. There was nowhere else that I would rather be. Now, as a fourth year, that feeling seems beyond foreign. I envy the students in my year who managed to graduate early. Much of this feeling can be attributed directly to the poor decision-making of the college. By choosing to implement a three-semester plan, the College took advantage of the third years, straining them and, most importantly, hampering their ability to prepare for a career after graduation.

In the summer of 2020, Oberlin College found itself in the unenviable position of planning an academic year during a pandemic. They knew, presumably, that determination was needed. And so, through a quick and unclear process, the decision was made to move to a three semester plan. A crucial part of this plan was astounding when the students were on campus. The second and third years would basically be forced to go to summer school. Yet only third years would have a spring semester immediately followed by a summer semester – then begin their final year a month later.

The only logical reason for giving third years the worst time is that they are the least likely to be transferred to another institution. For the most part, they are too used to Oberlin to leave on the basis of an unfair school schedule. If the first and second years were required to do two semesters in a row, many of them might have chosen to study elsewhere. The fourth years never had to worry about this possibility; the College could not have asked them to do a summer semester, as many of them had jobs, graduate studies and other programs starting soon after graduation. Thus, third-year students were stranded on campus from January to September, sacrificing our most valuable career development opportunities for the College’s bottom line.

I know that for me, and for many students I spoke to, the combination of spring and summer semesters was too much. After the spring semester was over, I was exhausted. I had started the semester in January with little energy, emptied of more than ten months of living in my house, separated from my friends. The semester itself was hardly rejuvenating. The punch, however, began the summer semester just ten days after finishing the finals.

In some ways, the summer semester was easier. I gave up some activities, was fortunate enough to live in village accommodation with friends, and took advantage of the temporary removal of COVID-19 restrictions. Yet the exhaustion never left. The spring semester was like driving too fast on a bumpy and dangerous road. The ride was stressful and the wear and tear on the car was immediate. During the summer semester, even though the road flattened out and I was able to drive a little slower, I still drove in the same rutted car. The result was a semester of burnout, prolonged illness, and a reduced ability to complete homework.

This, alone, is frustrating. COVID-19 may have guaranteed my third year would be poor, but college assured it would be miserable. The most infuriating aspect of this, however, isn’t burnout. It is the failure of the College to accompany us in the preparation of a career after Oberlin. Summers are a precious commodity for a student; during the summer we can get jobs to pay tuition fees, internships to strengthen our CV or pursue other opportunities such as intensive language programs and study abroad programs. The summer after our third year is especially important as this is usually the time when internships turn into job openings and when we work on scholarship and graduate applications. Instead, we were tasked with preparing for life after college as we were inundated with classes and exhausted from months of study. None of this is in keeping with the purported purpose of college – to prepare us for careers after graduation.

The Junior Practicum, the College’s solution to the fall semester we spent at home, provided us with a one month remotely paid internship. While this program was largely successful, the Practicum internships replaced opportunities lost due to COVID-19 in our second year. They don’t make up for the time we could have spent drafting large applications and working in person last summer, an opportunity available to most college students across the country.

Before COVID-19, a close friend of mine had study abroad experience and a political internship in the pipeline. These were two essential pieces of the puzzle for their future careers, and they had spent many months networking and applying for the programs. Due to COVID-19, both have been canceled. Without a summer break, they were unable to fill this gap in their resumes and their scholarship applications were compromised. There is simply no substitute for opportunities of this caliber.

When I was preparing this play, another friend of mine wondered what could be done by criticizing the three-semester plan. After all, why should the College ever start over? Yet less than two years ago, we assumed the same thing – that we would still operate on a biannual fall-spring schedule. As far as we know, directors may need to consider a similar plan in the future. If they do, I hope they will remember the toll this took on their students, faculty, and staff – and I hope they wonder if it was worth it.

We must also ask ourselves why the College is so disconnected from the reality of student life. How could administrators forget how critical the last summer is to getting a post-graduate career? Or was this consideration offset by the need to prevent students from transferring? Either way, it is disheartening to feel that the College is sabotaging the careers of its own students, rather than supporting them as it is supposed to.

Now that classes have started, I admit that my desire to graduate as soon as possible has waned. Although the campus is overwhelmed with students and the COVID-19 restrictions cannot be completely lifted, the College feels energized in a way I haven’t felt since before the pandemic. I am delighted to take classes, meet new people and work late in the revision office. I just wish I didn’t also scramble to save my graduate plans, feeling that my years of hard work might not be enough.


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Phoenix program aims to help small businesses survive big builds https://gicarg.org/phoenix-program-aims-to-help-small-businesses-survive-big-builds/ https://gicarg.org/phoenix-program-aims-to-help-small-businesses-survive-big-builds/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 09:46:10 +0000 https://gicarg.org/phoenix-program-aims-to-help-small-businesses-survive-big-builds/ Whether customers come for the pollo peño or the seaweed-topped Chino fries, the new streetcar construction made it difficult to access Chino-Mex, a family-friendly fusion restaurant on South Central Avenue in Phoenix. For Carlos Castillo, the owner of the restaurant, construction coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic threatened his two-year business. However, it did get financial […]]]>

Whether customers come for the pollo peño or the seaweed-topped Chino fries, the new streetcar construction made it difficult to access Chino-Mex, a family-friendly fusion restaurant on South Central Avenue in Phoenix.

For Carlos Castillo, the owner of the restaurant, construction coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic threatened his two-year business.

However, it did get financial help from the Small Business Financial Assistance Program (SBFAP) which was launched last January by the city of Phoenix and Valley Metro, the regional public transportation agency.

“It helps pay the payroll,” Castillo says. Although his restaurant is not right next to the rail project, it is affecting his business. “Sometimes they don’t have left or right turns, so it takes longer to get to the restaurant. They change lights all the time or they close the entrances. As a result, customers have to find new routes to the restaurant to avoid construction that started in the summer of 2020.

Administered by Prestamos CDFI, LLC, the one-year pilot program is funded by both the city and the Phoenix Community Development & Investment Corporation. Grants are available to small businesses affected by Valley Metro LRT projects as part of Phase II of the Northwest Extension and South-Central / Downtown Extension.

Valley Metro and the City of Phoenix turned to Prestamos to interview companies, determine their eligibility, and assist them with the application process on their site. website.

“We opened the application process in mid-March of this year and we started receiving applications, mainly in April and May,” said Terry Gruver, community relations for Valley Metro. “The goal is to try to help businesses sustain and overcome any impact of construction near them. One of the goals is to help businesses that rely on foot traffic i.e. customers who come in through the door, as opposed to a call center.

The South Central Extension is a five mile route that will connect South Phoenix to the regional light rail system. This region in particular has more small businesses, many of which are owned by minorities or women. “So that was really the goal when the city put the funding in place; to really help the most vulnerable and local businesses along the way, ”said Gruver. In addition, the program administrator had to demonstrate bilingual capacity and an understanding of the communities that would be affected and that needed to be served, attributes that Prestamos possessed.

Since the program’s inception, $ 253,000 in amounts up to $ 9,000 has been distributed to 50 companies, says Susan Tierney, director of communications for Valley Metro. So far, this is only a small percentage of the businesses affected – there are 566 businesses along Phase II of the Northwest Extension and the South Central / Central Extension hub – city, according to Tierney, and at least one local business recently cited the construction of the light rail as a major factor in their closure, but not all companies are eligible. They must earn less than $ 500,000, be locally owned, and have 15 or fewer employees. The grant money these businesses have received can be used for business operating expenses such as rent or mortgage payments, utility costs, insurance, and payroll. It cannot be used to pay taxes.

“We know it’s a challenge for businesses when they’re in an area where business is disrupted,” Tierney says.

When the program ends in early 2022, Gruver says the city and Valley Metro plan to review the effectiveness of the program and see if there are any areas that can be improved.

But for Castillo, from Mexico, the money coming from Prestamos made a big difference. “They walked me through the app and it was very straightforward,” he says. “[Without the grant] we would be long gone.

This story is part of our series, CDFI Futures, which explores the community development finance industry through the prism of equity, public policy and inclusive community development. The series is generously supported by Partners for the Common Good. Sign up for PCG’s CapNexus newsletter on capnexus.org.

Frances McMorris is a Tampa-based writer who has served as a court and legal reporter for the Wall Street Journal, New York Daily News, and Newsday. She specializes in legal and commercial matters.


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Local schools offering programs to help students catch up with the pandemic https://gicarg.org/local-schools-offering-programs-to-help-students-catch-up-with-the-pandemic/ https://gicarg.org/local-schools-offering-programs-to-help-students-catch-up-with-the-pandemic/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 23:08:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/local-schools-offering-programs-to-help-students-catch-up-with-the-pandemic/ TULSA, Okla. – Poor statewide test scores show that learning has slowed during the pandemic. Teachers and schools now have a big task ahead of them to help students recover from any learning loss due to the pandemic. “We had so many interruptions last year with COVID which had to close a class for 10 […]]]>

TULSA, Okla. – Poor statewide test scores show that learning has slowed during the pandemic. Teachers and schools now have a big task ahead of them to help students recover from any learning loss due to the pandemic.

“We had so many interruptions last year with COVID which had to close a class for 10 days,” said Rita Long, principal of Ellen Ochoa Elementary School.

But how do you keep students interested in learning even after the school day is over?

“The commitment is huge,” Long said. “We must have them out there eager to learn.”

Ellen Ochoa Elementary has found a solution with her after-school programs. They use partnerships and a grant from the State Department of Education to create project-based learning programs that will keep students excited to learn. They include activities ranging from basketball to the violin club.

“So we do a lot of self-selection,” Long said. “Students might want to learn more about mammals. So we are integrating reading, writing and math through whatever content they want to learn.”

Ellen Ochoa will host three sessions of her programming, each lasting approximately nine weeks. The first session currently has around 350 students enrolled. They hope to increase that figure to 600 by January.

Meanwhile, Tulsa public schools are also tackling extended learning for students.

“We see teachers who work hard, we see students who are eager to figure out what they need to do to catch up,” said Dr Ebony Johnson, head of learning at Tulsa Public Schools.

But helping students isn’t limited to their grades.

“We have a gap around the social, emotional and behavioral needs of students,” Johnson said. “So we see some areas where we need to step back, reorient and support. And that also directly affects their grade level. Need.”

For academics, TPS offers after-school tutoring services. They also create literacy support programs for students of all grades. They try to fill in the gaps and help students succeed

“Our work schedule for the day has changed a bit,” said Johnson. “Because we make sure that all of our students have an opportunity to intervene.”

Keep in touch with us anytime, anywhere –


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SecurityGate.io Reports Rapid Success of Partner Program https://gicarg.org/securitygate-io-reports-rapid-success-of-partner-program/ https://gicarg.org/securitygate-io-reports-rapid-success-of-partner-program/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/securitygate-io-reports-rapid-success-of-partner-program/ HOUSTON – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – SecurityGate.io, the risk management acceleration platform used by industrial companies to improve cybersecurity faster, today announced the rapid success of its partner program with over 30 registered partners since the launch of the program in June. Through the program, SecurityGate.io partners with Consultants, MSPs, MSSPs and VARs to help them […]]]>

HOUSTON – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – SecurityGate.io, the risk management acceleration platform used by industrial companies to improve cybersecurity faster, today announced the rapid success of its partner program with over 30 registered partners since the launch of the program in June.

Through the program, SecurityGate.io partners with Consultants, MSPs, MSSPs and VARs to help them grow sales faster and build deeper customer relationships. Additionally, the company has a strategic alliance program with companies such as Rumble, Darktrace, Nozomi Networks and Security Scorecard.

Three major trends have contributed to the growth of the company’s partnership program:

Asset owners seek digital transformation

SecurityGate.io CEO Ted Gutierrez explains that industrial companies want to digitize and visualize their cyber risk management programs, but there hasn’t been an OT cybersecurity-focused tool to do it effectively. The visualization of risks has always been on the shoulders of consultants, accustomed to creating spreadsheets and PowerPoints.

“Traditionally, consultants have filled this gap and now they see SecurityGate.io as an easier way to close this gap quickly and with pleasure,” said Gutierrez.

Limited travel due to COVID-19

In addition to the push for digital transformation, COVID-19 has limited travel for people in all sectors. This made it difficult for the consultants to perform on-site assessments and meet clients in person. The SecurityGate.io platform has won over security professionals as it enables them to perform remote cyber assessments at a fraction of the effort with SaaS workflows and report automation.

Cyber ​​risks continue to mature and intensify

Cyber ​​attacks have continued to increase in frequency and sophistication this year. This has led more and more organizations to become aware of their own cyber risk management programs. Gutierrez said the combination of these three trends has been key to the success of SecurityGate.io’s partner program.

SecurityGate.io continues to grow its partner program, and Gutierrez said the company is making significant investments to support its partners.

“I think we are the tip of the iceberg when it comes to enabling critical infrastructure sectors to see their cyber risks earlier.”

For more information on the SecurityGate.io Partner Program, please visit https://securitygate.io/partner-program/.

About SecurityGate.io

SecurityGate.io is a Houston-based cybersecurity software company. Their Risk Management Acceleration Platform helps industrial companies discover cyber risks earlier and deliver cybersecurity improvements faster. This is done by replacing slow, manual risk management processes with digital SaaS automation, agile workflows and data intelligence.

The company was recently included in Gartner’s 2021 Market Guide for Operational Technology Security and Takepoint Research’s 2021 Buyer’s Guide for Industrial Cybersecurity Technologies and Solutions. SecurityGate.io serves clients such as Chevron, Modec, Westlake Chemical, Diamond Offshore, and Patterson UTI.


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Invest in programs that stimulate children’s learning and development https://gicarg.org/invest-in-programs-that-stimulate-childrens-learning-and-development/ https://gicarg.org/invest-in-programs-that-stimulate-childrens-learning-and-development/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 22:05:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/invest-in-programs-that-stimulate-childrens-learning-and-development/ Congress will soon determine the extent of the nation’s investment in its youngest citizens. After years of marginal spending, President Biden’s plan for universal kindergarten for 3- and 4-year-olds, childcare subsidies, and increased salaries for teachers and caregivers recognizes that the early years of l childhood are of unique importance to public welfare and should […]]]>

Congress will soon determine the extent of the nation’s investment in its youngest citizens. After years of marginal spending, President Biden’s plan for universal kindergarten for 3- and 4-year-olds, childcare subsidies, and increased salaries for teachers and caregivers recognizes that the early years of l childhood are of unique importance to public welfare and should be funded as such. Investing in children’s early years pays off both for their success and that of their parents in life, as well as for their contribution to the economy and society – a multi-generational return.

The helping hand at school entry

By studying a diverse cohort of 2,500 children through preschool and early elementary school, we examined the benefits of enrolling in early education programs, whether at ages 3, 4, or 5 years. The results are clear: Enrollment contributes to students’ learning and development the year they enroll, and they enter the following year with significantly better results than their peers without these prior experiences. We call this effect the “start-to-school boost”.

Children receive this boost at the age of 3, 4 or 5 when they experience a program organized around educational and developmental principles. The boost is not trivial: it fills half of the skills gap between children from disadvantaged backgrounds and their richer peers or between minority and majority students. The boost is most obvious for early language and communication skills, reading and math, and for cognitive skills such as working memory and inhibitory control, all of which are essential for success.

The boost is most evident when children with early childhood education experience start a new school year well ahead of their peers who did not have this opportunity the previous year. For example, students who participated in a preschool program at age 3 were ahead of their peers at age 4 at the start of kindergarten. The increase at age 3, 4, or 5 was similar across a range of racial and ethnic groups – meaning that early education benefited all children – with suggestions that English learners acquired at a later date. even greater degree.

The skills enhanced by early education do not fade. Although the differences between children with and without previous early educational experiences diminish, this is entirely because children “catch up” when they are given the impulse to come to school for the first time. The boost is more likely to be sustained when followed by another year or more of high quality learning environments.

Preschool education programs stimulate learning through the experiences they provide in the classroom. We have observed in curricula and identified in classrooms that impulses can then support learning by stimulating and sustaining teacher-student interactions and relationships and stimulating learning-oriented activities taught in sensitive and sensitive ways. responsive. These “ingredients” benefit children of all racial, ethnic, linguistic and income groups. And if kids are lucky enough to land in classrooms like these year after year, their learning is sustained. Unfortunately, few children are so lucky.

Finally, we found that the emotional well-being of teachers is important for their ability to deliver these elements in their classrooms.

What do these results mean for the ongoing political debates?

First, preschool education programs are beneficial. Yet there are gaps in their availability. Full funding of universal access for 3 and 4 year olds would be a game changer. It’s time to welcome all 3 and 4 year olds to school—a public system of appropriate, stimulating and caring educational opportunities.

Access to an effective early education opportunity is too often a matter of luck. It’s time to make it a guarantee.

Second, public school systems should be held accountable for the quality and benefits of public education for 3 and 4 year olds. Legislation should ensure high standards for the curriculum, the classroom environment and the preparation and training of teachers. Legislation should require public school divisions and state agencies to manage the education of children aged 3 to 8 as a single integrated system.

Third, we need to invest in the adults who are on the staff of early learning and child care programs. Those (almost all women) who work with preschool children are teachers. Investments that increase and stabilize the wages and professional stature of educators are a necessary component of a national human capital strategy.

For many of our youngest, most vulnerable and marginalized citizens and their families, early childhood education can be a lifeline, just as it is for the most advantaged children. Access to an effective early education opportunity is too often a matter of luck. It’s time to make it a guarantee.


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Bridging the COVID Education Gap with Title 1 Funding https://gicarg.org/bridging-the-covid-education-gap-with-title-1-funding/ https://gicarg.org/bridging-the-covid-education-gap-with-title-1-funding/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 03:42:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/bridging-the-covid-education-gap-with-title-1-funding/ BLAKELY, Ga. (WTVY) – Early County Elementary School is working on a plan to close the education gap caused by COVID-19. The school plans to use the Title 1 funds to purchase resources to alleviate the problem. “The hiatus you’ve experienced over the past 18 months has put us beyond the proverbial eight bullets, I […]]]>

BLAKELY, Ga. (WTVY) – Early County Elementary School is working on a plan to close the education gap caused by COVID-19.

The school plans to use the Title 1 funds to purchase resources to alleviate the problem.

“The hiatus you’ve experienced over the past 18 months has put us beyond the proverbial eight bullets, I guess,” says Dr. Matthew Cullifer, principal of Early County Elementary School. “We had many students who already had an academic deficit who came to the school. As a five or four year old, not on par with other students in the class.

With that in mind, Early County Elementary School made it a goal to focus most of its Title 1 funding on closing the gap and increasing test scores.

“We try to both fill in the gaps and equip students with what they need to be successful as a student after they leave us and go to middle and high school,” says the Dr Cullifer.

For this school year, the school has set a goal of having at least 63% of students meeting the standard on English scores and at least 85% meeting the standard on math scores on the Georgia Milestone. .

“Lexia is one of our reading programs,” says Dr. Cullifer. “We have a math program called iLearn, both of which are tailored to individual student needs, so they can work at their own pace… We have funds that we also commit to an after school program that lasts two days. one week.”

Dr Cullifer says it will take more than just funding, but also the community.

“The best thing the public can do for us is support us,” says Dr. Cullifer. “It’s especially difficult when you have negative voices in the community who blame the teachers and say they don’t want to work and put the children at risk. It is not the case at all. We are doing our best. “

Dr Cullifer says a declining population in the county makes programs like Title 1 critical to student success. The funds will also be used to meet technological and other educational needs as they arise.

Copyright 2021 WTVY. All rights reserved.

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HGSE student council members say amplifying underrepresented voices a top priority | New https://gicarg.org/hgse-student-council-members-say-amplifying-underrepresented-voices-a-top-priority-new/ https://gicarg.org/hgse-student-council-members-say-amplifying-underrepresented-voices-a-top-priority-new/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/hgse-student-council-members-say-amplifying-underrepresented-voices-a-top-priority-new/ The Harvard Graduate School of Education student council will prioritize amplifying the voices of under-represented students and reducing the gap between distance learning and in-person students, according to several board members. In interviews, four members of HGSE’s student council, who sit on the Student Advocacy and Issues Committee and the Programming and Events Committee, shared […]]]>

The Harvard Graduate School of Education student council will prioritize amplifying the voices of under-represented students and reducing the gap between distance learning and in-person students, according to several board members.

In interviews, four members of HGSE’s student council, who sit on the Student Advocacy and Issues Committee and the Programming and Events Committee, shared their goals for the 2021-2022 academic year.

Members of the events committee have said they will try to organize events that welcome distance learning students.

Lisha MF Bornilla said the events committee will try to accommodate all students.

“We will try to target 100% of the events we want to do [to be] inclusive in terms of creating a hybrid model where we run events in person, but give people the ability to access those events remotely, ”she said.

Bornilla also said she hopes to create events that address student mental health.

“I’ve talked to people who really feel like they don’t have the tools to deal with the stress, the workload,” she said.

Jasmine N. Stecker, a member of the advocacy committee, said she believes students are still suffering the adverse effects of the coronavirus pandemic.

“I think the pandemic is still affecting most students, if not all, and one of the quietest voices right now are part-time students, especially students who are not on campus,” a- she declared. “They advocated for better access to online courses, or even face-to-face classes if they are in the area.”

Students learning remotely this semester were accepted into a special HGSE admission program in the summer of 2020 that allowed students, many of whom are working full time, to enroll part time and virtually at HGSE. .

Stecker said she believes her role on the board is to highlight concerns of students who are not speaking out.

“It will be an interesting challenge for the board to really seek out communities that need a voice but are not loud,” she said. “It’s difficult at Harvard because there are so many communities that are very, very loud, but we can’t just take the loud ones and forget about the non-loud ones.”

Xidong “Max” Tang, who also sits on the advocacy committee, said he would work to support under-represented student groups.

To better support first-generation students, for example, he said the council and the university should hold workshops on “how to get a good job”. He also said he believed there should be more resources on campus for BGLTQ students.

Board member Kanan Dubal also said she believes the school administration should seek feedback from international students, especially as HGSE is launching its new masters program. The program, announced in February, emphasizes teaching basic knowledge to students before more specialized training.

“I think student voices will be very important in defining these programs and getting student feedback,” Dubal said. “I wanted the voice of the international student community to be heard on these particular issues as well, to make sure that the programs are more inclusive, that they reach out to all kinds of populations, and not just for a specific subset of people. students. “

– Editor Omar Abdel Haq can be contacted at omar.abdelhaq@thecrimson.com.


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