Gap year programs – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ Mon, 16 May 2022 22:01:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gicarg.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-105x105.png Gap year programs – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ 32 32 How Micropatching Could Help Close the Security Update Gap https://gicarg.org/how-micropatching-could-help-close-the-security-update-gap/ Mon, 16 May 2022 22:01:41 +0000 https://gicarg.org/how-micropatching-could-help-close-the-security-update-gap/ Of the computer systems that cybercriminals successfully attack and compromise, the majority run software containing exploitable vulnerabilities. And, while there are a plethora of defensive tools and technologies to help detect and stop cyberattacks, none of them address the underlying weakness in the vulnerable code that exposes devices and systems to a threat. ongoing […]]]>

Of the computer systems that cybercriminals successfully attack and compromise, the majority run software containing exploitable vulnerabilities. And, while there are a plethora of defensive tools and technologies to help detect and stop cyberattacks, none of them address the underlying weakness in the vulnerable code that exposes devices and systems to a threat. ongoing risk.

The problem is only getting worse. In 2021, the National Vulnerability Database added nearly 22,000 new vulnerabilities, another record year. This makes patch management an increasingly important part of any security strategy, but it’s easier said than done.

According to Edgescan’s “Vulnerability Statistical Report 2021”, the average time for an organization to fix a vulnerability once it is identified – known as security update gap — is 60.3 days. This gives an attacker 60 days to find and exploit systems harboring this vulnerability. Unfortunately, many organizations won’t have as much time to fix it; Once a security vulnerability in an Internet-accessible service is made public, malicious code to exploit it typically appears within 48 hours.

Unfortunately, many vulnerabilities are never patched at all. In the Equifax breach, for example, the attackers entered via a known, unpatched bug. Many of today’s malware and ransomware variants take advantage of CVEs that have been around for five years or more.

Why is patch management so difficult?

There are various reasons why vulnerabilities are patched so slowly or not at all. First, users must wait for a vendor to analyze and fix a flaw, and then distribute a patched version of their software. And, while automatic and semi-automatic software updates from companies like Microsoft, Apple, Adobe, and Google help enormously to keep many popular software up-to-date, they often require system restarts, which may not be possible. practical or even viable for some businesses. Companies must also rigorously test updates before they can be deployed to production systems, a complex and time-consuming process that can take weeks or months.

The other big reason why patches never get applied is because people and businesses prioritize productivity over security. Users often resist closing running programs to restart and apply software updates, either because they don’t want to or because they can’t, especially in the case of software updates. critical business applications.

In Splunk’s “State of Security 2022” report, 44% of organizations surveyed said they experienced business process disruption due to breaches, and 44% lost confidential data. Both figures are up sharply from the previous year. The cost and disruption of a security breach certainly outweighs the cost and disruption of installing critical security patches. Nonetheless, most IT users continue to put productivity before security, giving attackers a clear advantage and underscoring the need for a different approach to patching.

What is the micropatch?

One possible way to reduce update time is through micropatching – using a small piece of code to fix a single vulnerability, without requiring a system reboot. Similar to a Microsoft Quick Fix Engineering patch or update, a micropatch is applied to a hot or active system, requiring no downtime or failure.

But, while a traditional patch update typically fixes a variety of issues and may even add new features, a micropatch fixes a single issue using as few lines of code as possible, with the goal of minimizing side effects. which may affect basic functionality. This means that the patch itself can be small, consisting of simple data on the following:

  • the patch
  • the vulnerable application
  • patch injection site
  • the patch code itself

Micropatches are currently available primarily from third-party vendors, rather than OEM software vendors.

Benefits of Micropatching

The main advantages of micropatching are:

  • Speed. A micropatch can be deployed in hours rather than weeks because it takes much less time to test whether the patch interferes with core functionality.
  • Simplicity. The fact that micropatches can be quickly applied and removed locally or remotely also simplifies production testing.
  • Availablity. Micropatching does not require downtime because it does not replace or modify executable and running files. Instead, the patch is applied in memory, which can be done without having to restart the software or system, allowing users and critical systems to continue working undisturbed. This technique is called snap function and has been around for some time. In the case of micropatching, function hooking is used to inject the patch code at a point in the running process so that the software bypasses the vulnerable code.

Some proponents also claim that micropatching can secure legacy, end-of-life, and unsupported products — such as Office 2010, Java Runtime Environment, Windows 7, and Server 2008 R2 — and make them safe to use, even if the original providers no longer support them.

Overall, the speed, ease, and stealth of micropatching can help close the security update gap. This, in turn, makes it harder for hackers to use popular attack vectors, such as buffer overflows and dynamic link library injection.

Risks and limits of micropatching

Micropatching cannot yet fix logical flaws in an application’s design or vulnerabilities in scripted code, such as PHP and Python, because the code is only interpreted at runtime.

Additionally, while micropatching allows vendors and developers to quickly and automatically deliver patches to users, security teams need to be able to validate the reliability of a patch before they can deploy it. Official patches from mainstream vendors come from reliable and secure servers. But, without such a reliable infrastructure in place, there is no way to ensure that a micropatch from a third-party vendor does not add malicious code or allow access to APIs and data. sensitive.

Also, since many software vendors currently consider micropatching to be unauthorized out-of-band patching, it could violate their license terms and conditions.

Micropatching as a service

Some companies are beginning to specialize in providing micropatches as a service for certain operating systems, monitoring newly discovered or released vulnerabilities and releasing micropatches for them. The most notable and well-known example is 0patch from Acros Security, based in Slovenia.

Devices subscribed to such a service can download new micropatches as they become available. A management dashboard displays all associated devices, and admins can decide whether to automatically patch all of them or only certain groups, such as non-critical or test devices. Alternatively, they can also choose to wait and manually trigger the installation after successfully testing the micropatch.

The future of micropatching

A strong patch management strategy greatly increases the resilience of an IT environment against attacks. Yet security teams continually struggle to deploy patches to all devices in a timely, secure, and scalable manner. Additionally, legacy applications with lost or poorly documented source code present additional problems, often resulting in aging but critical software that goes unpatched indefinitely.

Micropatching could significantly narrow the security update gap by allowing vulnerabilities to be patched with less risk and hassle before software vendors have released their own official patches. There’s still a long way to go before it becomes a mainstream option, but industry leaders are already taking micropatching seriously.

For example, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency launched the Assured Micropatching (AMP) program. Working with researchers from organizations such as Arizona State University’s Center for Cybersecurity and Digital Forensics, AMP aims to support rapid remediation of legacy binaries in mission-critical systems.

If a trustworthy and reliable ecosystem develops to create micropatches for all major operating systems and software products, patch management can become much faster and easier. This, in turn, would make life much more difficult for cybercriminals.

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The sun is shining on the 2022 Bridge the Gap to Health race | Community News https://gicarg.org/the-sun-is-shining-on-the-2022-bridge-the-gap-to-health-race-community-news/ Sun, 15 May 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/the-sun-is-shining-on-the-2022-bridge-the-gap-to-health-race-community-news/ QUINCY — After a week of scorching days, the weather for Saturday morning’s 22nd Bridge the Gap to Health race was everything organizers could have asked for. Quincy Medical Group community relations manager Morgan Parker said the weather seemed to have helped turnout for the event. “A lot of people came early this morning to […]]]>

QUINCY — After a week of scorching days, the weather for Saturday morning’s 22nd Bridge the Gap to Health race was everything organizers could have asked for.

Quincy Medical Group community relations manager Morgan Parker said the weather seemed to have helped turnout for the event.

“A lot of people came early this morning to sign up,” she said. “It’s been absolutely amazing, and I’ve had nothing but great feedback so far.”

Parker spoke on the phone while she was still on the race course herself.

“There were just big smiles on faces here today,” she said.

For the second year, the Bridge the Gap Race was without the iconic bridge crossings over the Mississippi River. Construction on the Quincy Memorial Bridge results in two-way traffic on the Bayview Bridge, eliminating both options.

In another change for 2022, the recipient of the fundraising event has changed from Quincy Catholic Charities’ MedAssist program to the YWCA’s supportive housing program. YWCA chief executive Maria Rench said the need for help for homeless people was growing.

“All proceeds go back and go directly back into the community,” Rench said. “Homelessness is a big problem, and it’s only growing. With the help of this event, we’ll be able to help even more people.”

Rench said the funds raised through the race will not only be used to meet the direct housing needs of the homeless.

“When you’re homeless, if you have a disability, for example, you can’t get any medical care you might need, even prescriptions,” she said. “So we help them with housing, but also with medication, transport to appointments, everything we can do to help them get up.”

Gary Hackmann crossed the finish line first in the half marathon race on Saturday morning. He said he had run most Bridge the Gap races over the years.

“They still have great charities they support,” he said. It was Catholic Charities MedAssist, now with the YWCA, if you can run a race to help support the community, that’s the best thing you can do.”

“Hopefully next year we’ll have the bridges back,” Hackmann continued. “It’s really the only opportunity you might have to do it. So whether you run or walk, it doesn’t matter. It’s for a good cause, and it’s just for fun.”

Parker expressed his gratitude to everyone who came, from runners to medical personnel.

“I just want to thank the participants, the volunteers, the staff, everyone for coming and coming together for such a great cause,” she said.

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NJ nursing support group touts wellness and stress management programs https://gicarg.org/nj-nursing-support-group-touts-wellness-and-stress-management-programs/ Thu, 12 May 2022 21:51:58 +0000 https://gicarg.org/nj-nursing-support-group-touts-wellness-and-stress-management-programs/ The stress felt by nurses as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic was a major driver behind the establishment earlier this year of the New Jersey Nursing and Emotional Well-Being Institute, made possible through a grant from one year of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. According to Sue Salmond, director of NJ-NEW and executive […]]]>

The stress felt by nurses as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic was a major driver behind the establishment earlier this year of the New Jersey Nursing and Emotional Well-Being Institute, made possible through a grant from one year of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to Sue Salmond, director of NJ-NEW and executive assistant dean of the Rutgers School of Nursing, it’s not just about meeting the immediate post-pandemic needs of nurses, but about preparing them for long and successful careers a once the coronavirus is gone for good.

The goal is to advance well-being and increase resilience, or the ability to bounce back from stressors, and Salmond said such treatment cannot wait, whether individually or within health care organizations where systemic issues may need to be addressed.

NJ-NEW is currently promoting a set of five programs that nurses in New Jersey can use to not only help them, but to “get more people to understand how you go from stress to stress injury, to a true clinical diagnosis of stress”, according to Salmond.

Virtual Schwartz rounds provide an online space where nurses can meet and share the challenges they have faced over the past two years, including the burden of coping with death and dying, and dealing with both isolation and public incivility.

Stress First Aid Train the Trainer, which Salmond says is derived from a model originally used for Navy combat officers, currently has nearly 40 participating organizations with another 20 ready to train. It emphasizes examining workers’ “vital signs” of stress and emphasizes problem solving instead of letting problems escalate to the point where they become unmanageable.

NJ-NEW will serve as the lead organization for the coordination of workplace activities recommended in the The future of nursing report from the National Academy of Nursing, which Salmond says is a more forward-thinking initiative.

“I don’t want COVID, or the experience of COVID, to be a barrier for people considering entering the profession,” she said. “We see a lot of people leaving nursing, and we need to create resilient workplaces in order to have a healthy and available nursing workforce for our communities.

the Nurse2Nurse the hotline offers confidential peer support, especially crucial at a time when nurse suicides have seen an alarming rise, according to Salmond.

“For years, we used to talk about the high incidence of suicide among doctors above the non-medical population. Now nurses have definitely surpassed that,” she said.

And the NJ-NEW Wellness Center will be a catch-all for feedback on how different programs have worked, how they have been implemented in different organizations, and what nurses can bring from their personal experiences to the profession in New Jersey as a whole.

All of this, Salmond said, serves to assess the culture of a particular healthcare organization, determining whether it is an environment that enables both excellence in patient care and well-being. be of his staff.

If both goals aren’t met, she said, these five programs aim to close the gap and recognize the value of nursing within the broader health care framework.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at patrick.lavery@townsquaremedia.com

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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NJ County Fairs are making a comeback: Check out the schedule for 2022

UPDATE 4/10: A current list of county fairs happening in the Garden State for 2022. From rides, food, animals and hot air balloons, each county fair has something unique to offer.

(Fairs are listed in geographic order from South NJ to North NJ)

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“For ’24s, by ’24s: “Spotlight on the Sophomore travel planning process https://gicarg.org/for-24s-by-24s-spotlight-on-the-sophomore-travel-planning-process/ Wed, 11 May 2022 06:28:43 +0000 https://gicarg.org/for-24s-by-24s-spotlight-on-the-sophomore-travel-planning-process/ Sophomore travel directors hope to build class unity and fill the void left by their class’ lack of first-year travel. by Omala Snyder | 54 minutes ago Every year since 1999, some sophomores have embarked on freshman adventures to kick off their second summer. These sophomore trips – called STRIPS – have been an annual […]]]>

Sophomore travel directors hope to build class unity and fill the void left by their class’ lack of first-year travel.

by Omala Snyder | 54 minutes ago

Every year since 1999, some sophomores have embarked on freshman adventures to kick off their second summer. These sophomore trips – called STRIPS – have been an annual tradition for decades and have always aimed to strengthen class bonds. However, since the Class of 2024 lack their opportunity to attend freshman trips as new students, the stakes this year seem particularly high.

A STRIPS student director, Nicolas Macri ’24, pointed out that because the class of 2024 didn’t take freshman trips, they also lost a major shared experience for Dartmouth students.

“Freshman trips give you a sense of belonging within the College as well as memories, confidence with the resources Dartmouth offers, and bring your class together as a whole,” Macri said. The 24-year-old completely ignores freshman travel traditions such as songs, which just makes us feel more isolated overall.

To compensate for this, STRIPS directors attempt to plan trips that mimic the freshman travel experience as much as possible. For starters, that means offering a wide range of trips — from cabin camping to backpacking to kayaking — that students can choose from, according to Evelyn Hatem ’24. Hatem, another director of STRIPS, stressed that she hopes STRIPS will appeal to all second-year students.

“We want to consider everyone’s interests,” Hatem said.

STRIPS directors are currently working on a number of projects within the program, such as risk management, equipment, awareness, food and inclusivity.

Samantha Palermo ’24, who will be a leader for STRIPS, was also a freshman travel leader last fall. She saw how crucial the Trips experience was to bonding within a class, and she expressed that she wanted to bring that experience back to life for the class of 2024.

“[Trips] was such a bonding experience. I saw with my own eyes how impactful it was and I really want to give that to the 24-year-old,” Palermo said.

In their planning, Macri said the STRIPS leadership was trying to promote inclusivity within the program.

“Given the different socio-economic backgrounds, some people may not feel completely comfortable with the outdoors and we want to encourage everyone to participate. This program is not just for people with outdoor experience. I myself am not involved in the [Dartmouth Outing Club]but I was able to be very involved in Trips, which is so much fun,” Macri said.

Mack Duthu ’24 said she wasn’t sure she could attend STRIPS as she wanted to spend time with her family during the break. However, she was seduced by the opportunity to be closer to the rest of her class.

“Most of my close friends on campus aren’t actually under 24 and I don’t know a lot of people in my class, which is one of the reasons I’m so looking forward to it” , she said.

Joe Earles ’23 took a year off during the pandemic and is now part of the class of 2024. He had a normal freshman travel experience and loved it, so wants to replicate the experience he has had for 24 years by being a leader of STRIPS, as well as getting to know the 24+.

“STRIPS is different from first-year trips because many people have formed friend groups because they’re halfway through their college experience. In that sense, I’m excited to see the bonds people form. with each other because whoever wants to go there is clearly passionate about making new friends,” Earles said.

Along with Earles and Palermo, Duthu expressed his appreciation for the work done by the STRIPS management. She’s expressed interest in a variety of STRIPS ranging from surfing and birdwatching to intermediate hiking and cabin camping, and she has high hopes — and confidence — for the program.

“I started doing a lot more outdoor stuff this term thanks to [People of Color Outdoors]. I’m excited to go on STRIPS because I really trust the management and the leaders. They are all super capable and amazing people,” Duthu said.

All three principals said they are grateful to the College for the support they have received – they are advised by a staff advisor from the Office of Outdoor Programs and work in conjunction with the freshman travel office.

“The 24 had a difficult start and a unique transition to Dartmouth. We came into sophomore year feeling like freshmen and we really want to give them a great experience that makes them feel like they matter as much as everyone else on this campus,” Macri said.

Palermo said she had a great experience leading a freshman trip last year and was excited to lead a STRIPS group this summer – embracing the idea of ​​class bonds and of reciprocity.

“[Leading a First-Year Trip] was such a bonding experience. I saw firsthand how impactful it was and I really want to give that to 24 years,” Palermo said.

As Hatem said, STRIPS is “a program for 24-by-24s,” and with a tenure full of sunshine and class ties on the horizon, its leaders and participants have high hopes.

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Bumstead: New budget brings tax relief, more for education https://gicarg.org/bumstead-new-budget-brings-tax-relief-more-for-education/ Wed, 04 May 2022 17:47:14 +0000 https://gicarg.org/bumstead-new-budget-brings-tax-relief-more-for-education/ LANSING, Mich. — The state Senate on Wednesday completed its budget plan for fiscal year 2023, committing $2 billion to tax cuts as well as increased funding for K-12 schools and community colleges. , among other increases. “My colleagues and I remain absolutely committed to providing tax relief to residents of West Michigan and those […]]]>

LANSING, Mich. — The state Senate on Wednesday completed its budget plan for fiscal year 2023, committing $2 billion to tax cuts as well as increased funding for K-12 schools and community colleges. , among other increases.

“My colleagues and I remain absolutely committed to providing tax relief to residents of West Michigan and those of our state, and the budget we approved today will ensure that everyone can keep a little more of what they he wins to help pay for the raise. cost of living at this time of historic inflation,” said Bumstead, R-North Muskegon. “Our budget also continues our multi-year commitment to increase education funding by increasing per-student funding by an additional $450 over last year. We’re also investing in a new Michigan Scholarship to provide up to $3,000 a year to students at Muskegon Community College, West Shore Community College, and other community colleges across the state.

Senate Bill 832 would invest $17.9 billion in K-12 education, a total increase of $938 million. After closing the per-student base allocation gap between schools last year, the Senate plan would use $630.5 million to increase the minimum base allocation by an additional $450 to $9,150 per student. This year. It would also include $70 million to help address learning loss due to COVID-19 closures.

The budget plan also made many investments in other key priorities.

It would increase support to $55 million for the Going Pro program to provide grants to support employee training, provide $40 million for the Michigan Reconnect program to help those seeking an associate’s degree or trade certificate, would provide $414.5 million to maintain wage increases for direct-care workers were instituted last year and are investing nearly $2 billion more in funding transportation from the local government to help repair local roads.

The budget bills also prioritize more revenue-sharing funds for local governments and more resources to train and hire 170 new Michigan State Police troopers, and 800 additional corrections officers. It would also provide a $1 million increase for secondary highway patrol grants that help support emergency response and traffic enforcement on local county roads.

SB 827-843 is now heading to the House of Representatives for review.

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Cedar Point and shattered summer dreams: 3News investigates https://gicarg.org/cedar-point-and-shattered-summer-dreams-3news-investigates/ Tue, 03 May 2022 02:37:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/cedar-point-and-shattered-summer-dreams-3news-investigates/ At least 27 sexual assaults reported to police from inside Cedar Point employee dorms since 2017 have led to only 3 arrests and call for a culture change. SANDUSKY, Ohio — For 19-year-old Raven Jones, the odds have always been higher. His wonderful years, an anxious ascent. The broken home, the multiple moves, the new […]]]>

At least 27 sexual assaults reported to police from inside Cedar Point employee dorms since 2017 have led to only 3 arrests and call for a culture change.

SANDUSKY, Ohio — For 19-year-old Raven Jones, the odds have always been higher. His wonderful years, an anxious ascent.

The broken home, the multiple moves, the new schools. The new bullies.

“Whether it was people joking about connecting the dots with my freckles, my weight, my height, my hair color… anything,” she told 3News Investigates.

She scarred her wrists with cuts, to soothe the pain inside.

“This is what my friends like to call the bracelet phase. Because, you know, wear a lot of bracelets. I had all kinds of bracelets,” she said.

But thanks to those friends and some advice, she made it through, graduating from New London High School, located about 35 miles southeast of Sandusky. Jones was even voted “most gullible” by his classmates, largely due to his kindness and confidence.

It was in the spring of 2021. Like many, she was tired of school. She sought to take a year off, delaying her dream of becoming a cosmetologist.

She needed a summer job, and Cedar Point presented itself as a top choice for pandemic-weary teenagers.

Cedar Point dangled high-wage, low-cost employee dormitories to attract thousands of teenage boys needed to staff the venerable Sandusky Park.

“My dad was like, you should go work for Cedar Point,” she said. “I’m like, why. He said, it’s $20 an hour, that’s double what you make at the nursing home.”

She applied online and was hired almost immediately. She packed her things and headed over to Sandusky to start her new adventure away from home. And everything seemed so perfect, at first. “It’s like college, but instead of going to school, you have work. I’m just like, ‘Oh, that sounds like fun. That sounds like something I’d like to experience “Who wouldn’t?”

These visions of summer perfection soon clouded over. In August, Raven was sexually assaulted in her dorm.

A 3News investigation, conducted with stations in Tegna, WTOL in Toledo and WBNS in Columbus, revealed that his story is far from the only one. This week, 3News will report several stories with other women who have filed reports of sexual assault, and responses from law enforcement, survivor advocates, ex-workers.

Using Ohio’s public records laws, Tegna stations have obtained 27 sexual assault reports that Sandusky police have investigated since 2017. Of those 27 cases, only three have resulted in charges.

The investigation also uncovered complaints about an out-of-control culture inside employee dormitories. Former workers say lax security has led to parties, alcohol abuse by underage workers and drug use that has led to multiple calls to 9-1-1 for overdoses.

Cedar Point has its own state-licensed police department that often took first calls. So far, the ministry has refused to release its reports.

“I had gotten to a point where I honestly didn’t want to be alive anymore,” Jones said.

Three victims have come forward alleging that Cedar Point allows the culture to fester and doesn’t care about assaults on workers.

“I was spiraling,” Jones said. “I got to the point where I couldn’t take it anymore. I can not. It seemed to go from bad to worse, like gnawing at me. I was so overwhelmed with thoughts and feelings that I just couldn’t take it.”

Cedar Point officials have refused repeated requests to discuss the sexual assault reports. Instead, they released a statement:

“The safety of our guests and associates is always our top priority. Through various methods, our on-site accommodation is monitored 24/7. Additionally, our team is available to assist associates at any time with multiple resources, including on-site security, an emergency text message program, a dedicated and confidential “Speak-Up Hotline” for associates, and the access to mental health programs. Associates are made aware of these resources during their onboarding process.

Cedar Point takes these issues very seriously. All reports of associate misconduct are immediately addressed, investigated and, if appropriate, referred to local law enforcement for further investigation.

For Raven Jones, the night of her attack happened in her dorm after a booze game last August with co-workers. Raven said she lost her struggle to stay awake.

“Well, that’s all I remember of that night. And then I woke up the next morning… My shawl sweater… was on the floor with my shirt and I didn’t know where my pants were and I woke up and there was a condom stuck to my leg.”

In her bed next to her was her attacker, a colleague she barely knew but a man she now feared. Struggling to remember the events and what to do, she then met with a Sandusky police officer and was given an intrusive sexual assault exam.

“I was just freaking out. I was just like, I have no idea what to do. I was, I was angry,” she said.

In the days that followed, her attacker continued to work. She also tried to work before speaking to a human resources worker from Cedar Point. She said she was offered leave, but without pay.

It would be months before she met a Sandusky police detective. She wanted to file a complaint. But the meeting did not go well.

“[The detective] was almost daunting for me to go further on more than one occasion. And it was upsetting because I felt discouraged to get justice for what happened,” Jones said.

It was the last time she saw the police. As for Cedar Point…

“Nothing. Cedar Point doesn’t care.

Police Chief Jared Oliver denies his detective tried to dissuade Raven from pressing charges.

He said the department had tried several times to arrange an earlier interview, but connecting with the accuser was difficult because Raven had moved and changed his phone number.

Oliver said the investigation was handed over to Erie County District Attorney Kevin Baxter in January to review the charges. So far, no charges have been announced. Baxter did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

For Raven and her family, her personal freefall continues as her abuser and others remain free.

This week, Cedar Point begins to welcome another generation of new summer workers in preparation for its 152nd season.

“It’s disturbing. Scary. It angers me because the fact that these things keep happening and they allow it / it’s extremely disturbing, disturbing and very upsetting,” Raven adds.

More from 3News investigation:

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Ivybrook Academy preschool to open in east Bradenton | Eastern County https://gicarg.org/ivybrook-academy-preschool-to-open-in-east-bradenton-eastern-county/ Sun, 01 May 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/ivybrook-academy-preschool-to-open-in-east-bradenton-eastern-county/ After tax season in 2021, Bethany Carr of Greenbrook started getting what she called the “COVID itch.” She wanted to try something new after 20 years of stressful tax seasons as a certified public accountant. Seeing the impact of a Montessori philosophy in education on her four children, Austin, 14, Evan, 8, Ethan, 7, and […]]]>

After tax season in 2021, Bethany Carr of Greenbrook started getting what she called the “COVID itch.”

She wanted to try something new after 20 years of stressful tax seasons as a certified public accountant.

Seeing the impact of a Montessori philosophy in education on her four children, Austin, 14, Evan, 8, Ethan, 7, and Eli, 5, she decided to own and operate a nursery school.

“We love the Montessori philosophy, which meets kids where they are,” Carr said. “It’s very child-led, interest-driven. This allows children to move at their own pace, and the model works well for so many students. »

Carr is opening Ivybrook Academy, a Montessori and Reggio Emilia-inspired half-day preschool, for the 2022-2023 school year. The school will be a new location for the national franchise which has at least 50 schools across the country.

Ivybrook Academy supports space behind the Whole Foods on University Parkway and Honor Avenue which is currently a daycare. The preschool’s lease will begin in June when Carr, the owner and director of admissions, will have some renovations completed before opening the school for tours in July.

She said most preschools in the area require parents to commit to full-time programs or year-round programs.

“There is definitely a demand for a part-time program that focuses on education and prepares your child for elementary school,” she said.

Carr said she knows parents who are on six-to-nine-month waiting lists for a spot at a local preschool. She said the Ivybrook Academy could help meet the demand.

“Ivybrook will fill a gap in preschool offerings in our community,” Carr said. “There is a real need for families who have a stay-at-home parent or who have a caregiver but still want a preschool experience for their child. They don’t want to have to commit to year-round kindergarten.

The school will follow a schedule similar to that of the Manatee County School District with a targeted first day of school on August 10.

The school will only start with a morning session available, but Carr said the school will add an afternoon session based on demand. Ivybrook Academy can accommodate 200 students.

Carr said Ivybrook Academy will provide individualized learning as teachers adapt to the level of the student. The children will be divided into small groups according to their abilities.

“The Montessori method is very child-friendly, and the teacher works alongside the child instead of standing in front of the classroom instruction,” Carr said. “If a child is interested in dinosaurs, for example, the teacher will use that interest in dinosaurs to help them learn letters or see words or help them with their math. It keeps the child engaged because that it’s something he’s interested in and yet he’s learning the skills he needs at the same time.

Reggio Emilia’s approach focuses on children as active participants in their growth and development process. Carr said the approach is hands-on and collaborative.

Classrooms also won’t look like typical classrooms, Carr said.

Classrooms can often have bright primary colors to try to provide a fun and welcoming environment, but Carr said the environment can sometimes be too stimulating for children. So at Ivybrook Academy, classrooms will have soft colors with natural materials to bring the outside world inside.

“It’s a much quieter environment that allows kids to tune out the excess noise and overstimulation, settle down, and learn,” Carr said.


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Students thrive outside of typical summer internships – The Cavalier Daily https://gicarg.org/students-thrive-outside-of-typical-summer-internships-the-cavalier-daily/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:43:18 +0000 https://gicarg.org/students-thrive-outside-of-typical-summer-internships-the-cavalier-daily/ As the end of the semester approaches, students at Grounds are taking advantage of global warming by spending more time outdoors. Whether playing spikeball or Frisbee on the lawn, having lunch at food trucks in the amphitheater or taking a study break at tables outside the halls, many are gazing into the light at the […]]]>

As the end of the semester approaches, students at Grounds are taking advantage of global warming by spending more time outdoors. Whether playing spikeball or Frisbee on the lawn, having lunch at food trucks in the amphitheater or taking a study break at tables outside the halls, many are gazing into the light at the end of the tunnel – summer.

For some students, the summer is spent gaining work experience at internships or jobs Across the country. For others, it’s a well-deserved break from the stress of academic classes and extracurricular commitments, as these students seek alternatives to the common internship experience.

College freshman Kyra Smith is one such student looking forward to a unique blend of college work and vacation through her study abroad program in Siena, Italy this summer.

“I’m looking forward to all of this, certainly the food,” Smith said. “I’ve never been to Europe or really traveled much, so I feel like it would be a whole new experience for me. I’m from northern Virginia so this will be my first time going somewhere I don’t know anyone so I think I’m going to grow a lot and obviously I’m excited to go and be in Italy. ”

For students like Smith, summer can be a time to gain new experiences that weren’t available in high school. Smith explained the differences between the middle school summer experience and the high school summer experience. Namely, how she perceives college students to be more productivity-oriented compared to high school.

“I also think that in college people think summer is more of an opportunity,” Smith said. “They’re like, ‘what can I do during this time to achieve my goals or work, or get an internship, or just do something that I’ve always wanted to do?’, while in high school , they think it’s a break where they can lay down for three months and enjoy it.

Other students will spend their summers in Charlottesville, such as third-year education student Evalyn Kim. Kim feels a tangible difference in her relationship with her hometown after spending nearly three years away from her.

“I’ve lived in my hometown all my life, so Warwick was all I knew before coming to U.Va,” Kim said. “I was quite happy with it, but there wasn’t much to do, and I knew that at the time, but now, coming back to it, it’s a whole different place. I love seeing my family and friends, but it’s definitely different because I feel more like a visitor.

Kim’s college experiences so far have made her feel more connected to Charlottesville and the people who reside there. This connection is so strong that she has come to regard Charlottesville as a place where she finds the most meaning and fulfillment. She can’t wait to find out more.

“I would think of Charlottesville more as home now, especially after being here last summer as well. I’ve really enjoyed exploring it so far and I’m really looking forward to finding some other cool places this summer” , said Kim.

Being in Charlottesville is a chance to be independent and to structure life around events other than classes. Kim says the absence of classes gives students more time to enjoy themselves and have fun while pursuing experiences that align with their career aspirations.

“I’m excited to do things that are really relevant to what I want to do in the future, but also to have the freedom to do what I want to do with my time,” Kim said.

School work can be an obstacle to students’ freedom of extracurricular or leisure activities that can bring them comfort and pleasure. Kim is personally thrilled to celebrate this freedom.

“It’s always really nice to be off schoolwork, and it’s a time to just have fun,” Kim said. “I think there’s a freedom in that your schedule can be whatever you want it to be, and it doesn’t have to be focused on when your classes are or homework. that you owed.”

Kim will spend the rest of the summer volunteering and working in the greater Charlottesville area as she prepares to begin her master’s program at the School of Education and Human Development next fall. She will also go on trips to visit hard-to-see family and friends during the school year using the new free time.

“I’m also planning on going to visit my brother in Austin,” Kim said. “He moved there in February so my parents and I are going to visit him and see Austin because neither of us have been there before. I’m also hoping to visit one of my best friends from high school attending Charleston College, so I might try to see her. I also plan to go home for a bit.

In addition to travelling, the warm weather also gives the opportunity to participate in more outdoor activities. Julio Buelna, a sophomore at the College returning from a gap year, says he has spent much of his time this year working at Outdoor Adventure through the University’s IM-Rec center. and plans to continue participating in outdoor activities this summer.

“[Outdoor Adventure] is a job, but it’s also something I love to do. As well [located] outside is a cave not too far from here that I plan to explore again,” Buelna said.

From spending more time outdoors to studying abroad, summer allows students to take a step back and enjoy the simple pleasures in life. Buelna described her love for taking advantage of her free time as well as the cool of the evening to relax and indulge in some of her favorite hobbies.

“I really like swimming…but I also like the relaxing nights during the summer,” Buelna said. “The days are really hot and then the night comes and I can go out and relax. It’s warm, just like a cool breeze and great weather…I’ll probably do some skateboarding in the summer too.

No matter what students choose to do during their summer, summer provides a welcome break from academic stress before the fall semester.

” I see [summer] like a break,” Smith said. “It’s good because whether you work or not, whether you do an internship or something like that, it’s different from what you do most of the year. Even if you’re busy, it’s still a break from what you normally do before everything resets and it’s all new when you come back. So I think it’s a nice transition period.

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Hinchey: Investment Will Close Housing Gap | Greene County https://gicarg.org/hinchey-investment-will-close-housing-gap-greene-county/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 03:28:11 +0000 https://gicarg.org/hinchey-investment-will-close-housing-gap-greene-county/ ALBANY — State Senator Michelle Hinchey is touting the state’s first-ever comprehensive investment in upstate and rural housing that is included in the approved state budget for 2023. The state budget, which was signed by Governor Kathy Hochul on April 9, includes more than $236 million in funding to address the affordable housing crisis in […]]]>

ALBANY — State Senator Michelle Hinchey is touting the state’s first-ever comprehensive investment in upstate and rural housing that is included in the approved state budget for 2023.

The state budget, which was signed by Governor Kathy Hochul on April 9, includes more than $236 million in funding to address the affordable housing crisis in rural and upstate areas of New York.

“Upstate is routinely left out of the conversation when it comes to housing finance assistance, and because of this inequity, we face a severe shortage that has made it nearly impossible to find a safe and affordable to live in our communities,” Hinchey said in a statement. “This year I took a stand, rallied my colleagues, and created the first-ever comprehensive plan for an investment in upstate and rural housing, and I’m proud to say we delivered on our promises.

“We have secured the largest real estate investment in Upstate New York that will significantly improve and expand our local rental housing supply and create pathways to affordable long-term homeownership. This is a big step forward in ensuring young residents, seniors and growing families have the stable and secure upstate housing they need, and we will continue to work until everyone has a home they can safely and affordably call their own.

Hinchey, D-Saugerties, helped secure housing funding that includes $36 million to give low- and middle-income families the opportunity to own homes through the Affordable Housing Corporation and $35 million to provide upstate homeowners facing foreclosure proceedings with legal services through the Homeowner Protection Program.

The state will also inject $50 million into state land banks to help convert vacant properties into affordable housing.

Kevin O’Connor, chief executive of RUPCO, the Kingston-based nonprofit housing developer that has partnered with the Hunter Foundation to develop affordable workforce housing in Tannersville, praised the efforts of Hinchey to secure funding for housing in the upstate region.

“Given the searing housing crisis we face in the Hudson River Valley, we appreciate Senator Hinchey’s strong leadership and support for affordable, rural and upstate housing initiatives,” said O’Connor said in a statement. “Sen. Hinchey has listened to the needs of his constituents and helped provide strong funding through several housing programs that will help first-time home buyers, create small rental housing developments while funding programs to help tenants and owners to go through difficult times.

“As RUPCO currently attempts to convert an old hotel into permanent supportive housing for the homeless, we appreciate Senator Hinchey’s successful advocacy to expand the Housing Our Neighbors with Dignity Act statewide. We look forward to working with Senator Hinchey to address the vast housing needs of her constituents.

The state budget also includes $5.46 million in funding for the Rural Preservation Program to help provide affordable housing and additional services for families, including legal assistance.

The housing project also includes $7 million to help create small-scale rental projects between five and 20 rental units under the Small Rental Development Initiative.

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Testimony Theater connects teens with Holocaust survivors https://gicarg.org/testimony-theater-connects-teens-with-holocaust-survivors/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 17:07:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/testimony-theater-connects-teens-with-holocaust-survivors/ The program aims to approach teaching about the Holocaust in an impactful way for students and the public. CLEVELAND – Through connection, interviews and performances, the stories of those who lived through the Holocaust are remembered and shared. Testimony Theater is a program that connects Cleveland teens with Holocaust survivors and their families. Students in […]]]>

The program aims to approach teaching about the Holocaust in an impactful way for students and the public.

CLEVELAND – Through connection, interviews and performances, the stories of those who lived through the Holocaust are remembered and shared.

Testimony Theater is a program that connects Cleveland teens with Holocaust survivors and their families. Students in grades 7 through 12 interview their subjects, then create and perform vignettes based on their experiences. The children then reflect on these stories, find creative ways to illustrate their impact, and organize interactions with their audience to answer questions.

For Sheri Gross, director of the Theater of Testimony program, Holocaust education is personal. Growing up in Rochester, New York, Gross recalled Yom HaShoah remembrance ceremonies where Holocaust survivors gathered in their concentration camp uniforms.

“When I was growing up, the Holocaust happened like 30 years ago,” she said. “It was our recent Jewish history, our recent world history, so exposure to survivors was normal.”

These days, Gross said she’s discovered that parents can “think differently about the kind of exposure they want their child to have to painful situations,” and said some kids can be “out there.” ‘shelter’ from certain truths and realities that she grew up with. more exposure to. For her, this is where Testimony Theater can make an impact.

“Our students, our children are our bridge builders,” she explained. “They are our leaders, they are our changemakers, they are our advocates. They are the ones we rely on to be able to tell these stories and ensure that the Holocaust never happens again, and they are not going to be able to. do so until they have the right kind of impact.

“It’s programs like this that can expose them and help them internalize and say, ‘This is something I’m passionate about. I want to move forward and make sure my community gets it, my world gets it. “”

Amnon Ophir is a director at @akiva, which provides opportunities for Cleveland teens to learn about and strengthen their Jewish identity. Testimonial Theater is produced by @akiva.

Ophir said he brought the concept of the Testimony Theater from Israel and adapted it for Cleveland. Now he hopes more schools have these types of programs.

“Holocaust education for a lot of teenagers is one day a year on Yom HaShoah,” he said, “and I think they need to do more.”

Maya Greller, 16, who lives in Ohio, also sees the importance of teaching about the Holocaust.

:Doing something like Testimony Theater – which takes a very, very heavy subject matter and makes it more laid back and makes it a little bit easier to digest – it does a really good job of somehow bringing it to an audience that doesn’t hear about day to day,” Greller said.

Gross adds that Testimony Theater is even more personal for participants this year, as all of the stories they tell have connections to the students involved. Avigail Botnik, 18, is an Israeli gap year student in the United States, and says that growing up in Israel, the subject of the Holocaust “surrounded” her openly.

His grandfather was a Holocaust survivor; now she participates in the Testimony Theater.

“By playing you can actually show emotions and not just the story on paper,” Botnik said. “That’s how people can really understand the story better so they can share it later. If someone shared my grandfather’s story as a story about [a] Holocaust survivor he knows, I did what I had to do.”

Although the subject matter and stories shared can be graphic, Gross believes the students showed maturity and compassion in learning and interpreting them.

“I want them to understand what these survivors have been through, what is the impact of surviving situations like the Holocaust – how it can impact a family and generations, and what led to the Holocaust and what to look for and how to be honest,” Gross told 3News. “How to be proud of who they are and how to feel good about the change they want to make.”

The importance of these stories and ensuring they are shared and passed on is not lost on Greller.

“Survivors, they come to the end of their rope,” she said. “In the next 10 to 15 years, who knows how many will still be around? But as long as we keep telling their stories, they’ll never really die.”

Testimony Theater will perform at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 17 at Gross Schechter Day School and is free and open to the community. Although so far the program has only had Jewish students in their casts, they hope that students from all walks of life will join them. Ophir also said that if other educators want to bring the program to their school, they can contact him at aophir@jecc.org.

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