Buenos aires – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 19:08:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gicarg.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-105x105.png Buenos aires – Gicarg http://gicarg.org/ 32 32 Buenos Aires Weather | President Fernández packs his bags for Germany and the G7 https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-president-fernandez-packs-his-bags-for-germany-and-the-g7/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 19:08:50 +0000 https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-president-fernandez-packs-his-bags-for-germany-and-the-g7/ President Alberto Fernández will travel to Germany this weekend for the G7 leaders’ summit at Schloss Elmau, Bavaria. Invited a month ago by German Chancellor Olaf Sholz, the Argentinian leader will be the only Latin American leader at the event which brings together the seven most powerful countries in the world, excluding China and Russia. […]]]>

President Alberto Fernández will travel to Germany this weekend for the G7 leaders’ summit at Schloss Elmau, Bavaria.

Invited a month ago by German Chancellor Olaf Sholz, the Argentinian leader will be the only Latin American leader at the event which brings together the seven most powerful countries in the world, excluding China and Russia. The event will focus primarily on the war that continues to rage in Ukraine, and President Volodymyr Zelensky is also expected to attend.

Fernández spoke out against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, calling for a ceasefire and for all sides to sit down and negotiate. So far, his statements have enabled him to face pressure from the United States calling for tougher sanctions against the government of Vladimir Putin. Argentina’s leader will have to balance this hot scenario, but the president’s agenda will focus on the main reason he was invited.

Fernández will arrive in Bavaria as a representative of Argentina, but also as temporary head of the regional bloc of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC). With this objective in mind, he will bring with him the common proposals of the 33 countries that make up CELAC and will once again launch his call for peace, but at the same time he will seek to deepen two issues that are of great interest to Buenos Aires: the possibility of Argentina becoming a supplier of gas and food for the Old Continent, which seeks to replace energy imports that deepen its dependence on Moscow amid endless war on the horizon close.

Before leaving for Germany, Fernández will participate virtually in the 14th BRICS summit, the regional bloc made up of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. The group is currently analyzing Argentina’s entry and the president’s participation in the event will take place within this framework. The government is focusing its efforts on South Africa – the only BRICS member to have yet made a decision on Argentina’s potential inclusion.

While Fernández tunes into the virtual meeting, Foreign Minister Santiago Cafiero will depart for New York, where he will participate in the annual session of the United Nations Decolonization Committee. He will be accompanied by an Argentine delegation which will include representatives of the ruling coalitions and the opposition. All will highlight Argentina’s ongoing sovereignty claim over the Malvinas (Falkland) Islands, 40 years after the end of the war.

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Buenos Aires Weather | Colombians set to vote in high-stakes presidential runoff https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-colombians-set-to-vote-in-high-stakes-presidential-runoff/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 21:22:35 +0000 https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-colombians-set-to-vote-in-high-stakes-presidential-runoff/ Colombians vote on Sunday in a presidential runoff that features promises of sweeping change in a country struggling with widespread poverty, violence and other woes. After a tense campaign marked by allegations of death threats against several candidates, opinion polls place leftist Gustavo Petro and businessman Rodolfo Hernández neck and neck. If he won, former […]]]>

Colombians vote on Sunday in a presidential runoff that features promises of sweeping change in a country struggling with widespread poverty, violence and other woes.

After a tense campaign marked by allegations of death threats against several candidates, opinion polls place leftist Gustavo Petro and businessman Rodolfo Hernández neck and neck.

If he won, former guerrilla Petro would become Colombia’s first left-wing president.

Otherwise, the independent Hernández – a millionaire construction magnate and former mayor of the northern city of Bucaramanga – will have the chance to keep his promise to rid the country of the “thieves” and the “bureaucracy” he accuses of corruption Politics .

The only certainty is that whoever wins the new vice-president will be a woman of African descent. It will be environmental activist Francia Márquez, 40, if Petro wins or conservative academic Marelen Castillo, 53, if Hernández wins.

Former Bogotá mayor Petro was very clear in last month’s first round with 40% over Hernández, who jumped out of nowhere to finish with 28% and eliminate right-wing establishment candidate Federico Gutiérrez.

But the results of the first round are misleading, say analysts, who say it was an “anti-establishment” vote to rebuke political elites.

Petro’s proposed “change” and Hernández’s vow to fight corruption struck a chord with voters and left both conservative and liberal powers in the doldrums.

Whoever wins will have to tackle 39% poverty and 11% unemployment.

“Both are also uncertain and risky (candidates) because they have been impulsive in making decisions,” said Germán Prieto, a political scientist at Javeriana University.

“Warm Attacks”

The past four years under President Iván Duque – who is constitutionally barred from running again – have been a disappointment.

He will leave office with low popularity after a four-year term marked by the coronavirus pandemic, recession, mass anti-government protests brutally suppressed by security forces and a rise in violence linked to criminal gangs involved in drug trafficking as the world’s largest producer of cocaine.

Colombia is a country often described as a volcano on the verge of eruption.

Progressive Petro has promised to strengthen the state apparatus, raise taxes on the rich and accelerate the green energy transition.

Hernández has made superficial and surprising commitments, such as getting rid of the fleet of cars used by government officials or legalizing marijuana.

However, questions remain about everyone’s ability to govern.

Petro would likely face defiant elites — possibly including the military — determined to thwart him, while Hernández would be almost without allies in Congress. And while portraying himself as a champion in the fight against corruption, he himself faces a bribery trial next month over the award of a public works contract to a company linked to his son during his town hall in Bucaramanga.

Petro has faced leaked recordings of his campaign team discussing how to ‘discredit’ opponents, including using defamation – an embarrassment for the candidate who promised during the campaign trail that he would carry out a ‘political of love”.

“The path leading to this presidency has been nothing but belligerent attacks, scandals, dubious support, spies, infiltrations, denunciations and death threats, among others”, writes the major daily. The Spectador.

‘Doomsday scenario’

Petro questioned the software used in the presidential vote count following errors during the March legislative elections.

“We don’t have any guarantees that we’ll be able to tell people it’s reliable,” he said earlier this week.

These “doubts” were added to the “challenge of the second round with a result that was too close… in a context of extreme aggression”, added The Spectador.

For a diplomatic source, the close race of the razor is “the worst scenario” and means that there is “a risk of outbreak and violence” after the announcement of the results.

The last time a president was narrowly elected – Misael Pastrana in 1970 – accusations of fraud and the frustrations of many voters led to the creation of a new urban guerrilla movement.

Another tight result “could cause a social problem with consequences on the streets,” said Luisa Lozano, a political scientist at La Sabana University.

Lozano is particularly wary of “some Petro supporters” in the event of a defeat.

– TIMES/AFP

related news

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Pedro Lylyk – NeuroNews France https://gicarg.org/pedro-lylyk-neuronews-france/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 20:44:48 +0000 https://gicarg.org/pedro-lylyk-neuronews-france/ Pedro Lylyk’s work and accomplishments in the field of neurosurgery span decades, from a landmark intracranial stent placement in 1996 to leading the first-in-man study of a new treatment for cancer. hydrocephalus in 2022, with over 10,000 brain aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated in between. Since the mid-1980s, Lylyk has dedicated his career to […]]]>

Pedro Lylyk’s work and accomplishments in the field of neurosurgery span decades, from a landmark intracranial stent placement in 1996 to leading the first-in-man study of a new treatment for cancer. hydrocephalus in 2022, with over 10,000 brain aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated in between. Since the mid-1980s, Lylyk has dedicated his career to developing and improving treatment options in endovascular neurosurgery, as well as training young physicians around the world. He is also currently Director and CEO of ENERI (Equipo de Neurocirugía y Radiología Intervencionista) and Clínica La Sagrada Familia in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in addition to several other titles and appointments. Here, Lylyk gives NeuroNews a window into his career and explains how the field of neurosurgery changed during this time.

What initially attracted you to medicine, and the field of neurosurgery in particular?

As far back as I can remember, I wanted to be a doctor. I knew from the start that neuroscience and the brain were so interesting, and that there was a lot to understand, develop and emerge. After completing my residency in neurosurgery, I shared with my mentors the concept of treating disease with minimally invasive therapy – a technique that was evolving at the time!

Who have been your mentors and what impact have they had on your career?

My mentors were Raúl Carrea, who is a pediatric neurosurgeon, and Charlie Drake, in neurosurgery, Julio Castaño, a neurologist, and Fernando Viñuela in interventional neuroradiology. I tried to combine the best of all these fields in this new specialty. All have been inspiring and generous teachers, not just in neuroscience, and they have also demonstrated exemplary leadership, ethics and commitment. I have been fortunate to be able to learn from my friends and colleagues around the world, to exchange ideas and experiences, to share specialized seminars, to monitor, to observe cases, to do research and to participate in numerous meetings, symposia, discussions and conferences.

You are known for placing the first intracranial stent in 1996. Can you describe the procedure and how you achieved this success?

I was performing a very difficult case of acute posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) dissection and there was no other option. Fortunately, our team included interventional cardiologists, with whom we discussed the emergency case, and we decided to give the patient a chance by implanting a coronary stent, which the family agreed to. That was in 1996 and the patient is perfect to this day.

How has your postgraduate training in North America influenced you as a neurosurgeon?

I did my fellowship in Neurosurgery at University of Western Ontario in London, Canada and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in Los Angeles, USA. I still remember Charles Drake’s advice today, telling me that endovascular neurosurgery had a bright future!

In your experience, how does neurosurgical practice and research differ in South America compared to other parts of the world?

Our experience in Latin America is very good. We were trained in Europe and North America and today we train many people from different countries in Latin America. The current state of medical education and the opportunities available in Latin America, however, face major challenges due to a lack of resources and the fact that funding and access are very different depending on the health system or the country.

Why did you decide to develop a training program in endovascular neurosurgery and interventional radiology in your center, and how successful have these programs been?

Since Fernando Viñuela and other young and enthusiastic neuroradiologists had founded SILAN (Sociedad Iberolatinoamericana de Neurorradiología Diagnóstica y Terapéutica), I decided that we should create our own center, the International Center for Endovascular Training (ICET). The objective was to receive and teach Ibero-Latin American doctors for at least a year, in collaboration with three other universities in Buenos Aires, since the training of doctors in interventional neuroradiology in Latin America was an imperative need. Today we also receive people from several other countries, including China, India, Japan and places in Europe. I am very proud and grateful to all of them.

Pedro Lylyk

What do you think has been the most important development in the field of neurosurgery during your career?

There were three particularly important steps, in my opinion:

  • The Detachable Guglielmi Coil (GDC), which was introduced in the 1990s and led the endovascular treatment of brain aneurysms
  • After that, intracranial stents, as a treatment for stenosis of the intracranial or carotid arteries
  • More recently, flow diverters and intrasaccular flow disruptors have provided a new option for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

Also, today we have a better understanding of brain diseases and how best to care for these patients.

What is the greatest unmet need for neurosurgical care today?

The field of interventional oncology must evolve, this will be one of the greatest challenges in the near future.

What achievement are you most proud of in neurosurgery?

Early treatment of newborns with Vein of Galen aneurysms (a rare form of AVM in which the embryonic precursor of a vein at the base of the brain becomes dilated, causing too much blood to flow to the heart ). My team and I have performed these treatments over many years, with a difficult but improved technique, in our center in Buenos Aires.

Besides your own work, what is the most interesting neurosurgical research you have seen in the past year?

Besides endovascular neurosurgery, the most interesting future prospect is the development of new techniques for non-vascular diseases such as hydrocephalus via the endovascular route. This is a new and exciting project that I am working on today with my colleagues Adel Malek and Karl Hellman from CereVasc and Tufts University (Somerville, USA). As the principal investigator of the first-in-man ETCHES I study, I have previously published a case report detailing early treatments for communicating hydrocephalus with the eShunt System (CereVasc) in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgeryand the first normal pressure hydrocephalic patient was also recently treated with the device at Clínica La Sagrada Familia.

What advice would you give to people embarking on a career in neurosurgery?

Our field has grown very quickly, but there are still plenty of opportunities to learn and improve. Younger generations have to study hard and enjoy many innovations and interactions between different fields, while the study of anatomy, physiology and pathology is also very important. The new generation must think outside the box in order to improve the quality of life of our patients as well.

What are your interests outside of medicine?

Outside of medicine, my interests are studying history, tennis, and traveling with my family – my wife, Sandra Boreisink, and my three wonderful children, Ivan, Pedro Nicolás, and Natalia. Since my childhood, I was a dancer in the Ukrainian ballet in Argentina and ended up being its director. Today, I really enjoy opera and watching classical ballet at the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires. As a Ukrainian descendant, I am also proud to be the Honorary Consul of Ukraine in Buenos Aires, and I have chaired the Argentine Representation of Central Ukraine (RCU-Representación Central Ucrania) since 2011.

Information folder

Current appointments:

  • Neurosurgeon, Director and CEO, ENERI (Equipo de Neurocirugía y Radiología Intervencionista) and Clínica La Sagrada Familia, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Chair of Neurosurgery and Hemodynamics, University of Buenos Aires (UBA)
  • Professor and Director, Department of Vascular Medicine, Universidad del Salvador (USAL)
  • Professor and holder of the Chair of Endovascular Surgery, Universidad de Ciencias Sociales y Empresariales (UCES)

Education:

  • MD, Faculty of Medicine, UBA
  • Pediatric Neurosurgery Residency, Ricardo Gutiérrez Children’s Hospital
  • Fellowship in Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Therapeutic and Endovascular Neurosurgery, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, USA

Honors (selected):

  • 2009: Master in Neurosurgery, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS)
  • 2011: “Exceptional personality in science”, legislature of Buenos Aires
  • 2015: First Tribute to Men and Women in Health, Health Prize, UCES
  • 2018: First non-Spanish physician distinguished as an honorary member, Official College of Physicians, La Coruña, Spain

Lylyk is also a co-founder of the Cerebrovascular Research and Education Foundation (CREF) Educational Grant, which enables young physicians, technologists and nurses from around the world to attend the World Live Neurovascular Conference (WLNC) – the case discussion the most intense and educational live. platform that revolves around the world from one continent to another every year.

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Buenos Aires Weather | Dom Phillips and Bruno Pereira: two men who loved the Amazon https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-dom-phillips-and-bruno-pereira-two-men-who-loved-the-amazon/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 16:03:29 +0000 https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-dom-phillips-and-bruno-pereira-two-men-who-loved-the-amazon/ Veteran British freelance journalist Dom Phillips and respected Brazilian indigenous expert Bruno Pereira shared a passion for the far reaches of the Amazon rainforest, where they disappeared and were buried, according to confessions obtained by police. The couple were last seen early on June 5, traveling by boat in Brazil’s Javari Valley (Javari Valley), a […]]]>

Veteran British freelance journalist Dom Phillips and respected Brazilian indigenous expert Bruno Pereira shared a passion for the far reaches of the Amazon rainforest, where they disappeared and were buried, according to confessions obtained by police.

The couple were last seen early on June 5, traveling by boat in Brazil’s Javari Valley (Javari Valley), a remote jungle region near the border with Peru, where Phillips was looking for a book.

The area has seen an upsurge in criminal activity in recent years, including illegal logging, gold mining, poaching and drug smuggling – incursions that Phillips reported and Pereira vigorously fought against .

Police said on Wednesday that one of the two men arrested for their disappearance admitted to burying their bodies in the jungle. Although human remains have been found, they have not been definitively confirmed to be those of Pereira and Phillips.

The two had previously traveled there together in 2018 for a feature article Phillips wrote in a British newspaper The Guardian on an uncontacted tribe – one of an estimated 19 in the region.

“Wearing just shorts and flip flops as he crouches in the mud by a fire, Bruno Pereira, an official with Brazil’s government agency for the natives, cuts open the boiled skull of a monkey with a spoon and eats his brains out for breakfast as he discusses politics, “it started.

This memorable introduction sums up the two men well, brave adventurers who loved the rainforest and its peoples, each defending the Amazon in their own way.

“Sharp and caring journalist”

Phillips, 57, started out as a music journalist in Britain, editing the magazine Mixmag and write a book about the rise of DJ culture.

Attracted by DJ friends, he left for Brazil 15 years ago, falling in love with the country and the one who became his wife, Alessandra Sampaio, originally from the city of Salvador, in the northeast of the country.

Reinventing himself as a foreign correspondent, Phillips covered Brazil for outlets such as Tthe New York Times, The Washington Post, FinancialTimes and The Guardianwhere he was a regular contributor.

A group of friends and colleagues described Phillips as “one of the sharpest and most caring foreign journalists in South America”.

“But there was a lot more to him than pages and paragraphs. His friends knew him as a smiling guy who got up before dawn to go stand-up paddleboarding. We knew him as a caring volunteer who gave lessons English in a Rio favela“, they said in a statement.

Phillips has traveled and written about the Amazon for dozens of stories, winning an Alicia Patterson Foundation Fellowship last year to fund her project to write a book about sustainability in the rainforest. The project brought him back to the area he loved.

“Charming Amazon,” he posted on Instagram earlier this month, alongside a video of a small boat meandering down a winding river.

“Courageous and Dedicated” Indigenous Advocate

Until recently, as a senior expert at Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency, FUNAI, Pereira was responsible for programs for isolated and newly contacted indigenous groups.

As part of this work, the 41-year-old organized one of the largest expeditions ever to monitor isolated groups and try to avoid conflict between them and others in the area.

Fiona Watson, research director of indigenous rights group Survival International, called him a “brave and dedicated” advocate for indigenous peoples.

Pereira was particularly revered for his knowledge of the Javari Valley, where he also served as FUNAI’s regional coordinator for years.

But he was on leave from the agency after clashing with the new leadership put in place by far-right President Jair Bolsonaro, who faces accusations of dismantling programs to protect indigenous peoples and the environment since taking office in 2019.

Pereira “was expelled from FUNAI, basically because he was doing what FUNAI should be doing and has stopped doing since Bolsonaro took office: defending indigenous rights,” Watson told AFP. AFP.

Pereira has frequently received threats for his work fighting illegal invasions of the Javari reserve. This includes helping to set up Aboriginal patrols. He and Phillips were on their way to a meeting on such a patrol project when they disappeared.

“Each time he enters the rainforest, he brings his passion and willingness to help others,” Pereira’s family said in a statement.

related news

by Marcelo Silva de Sousa, AFP

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Vico Ortiz denounces the government of Buenos Aires for gendered language https://gicarg.org/vico-ortiz-denounces-the-government-of-buenos-aires-for-gendered-language/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 19:55:09 +0000 https://gicarg.org/vico-ortiz-denounces-the-government-of-buenos-aires-for-gendered-language/ Vico Ortiz in Our Flag Means Death The head of government of Buenos Aires, Horacio Rodríguez Larreta, announced on Friday that he would ban the use of the inclusive Spanish language in schools in the Argentine capital, the Buenos Aires time reports. The move drew an immediate backlash from proponents of inclusive language, which is […]]]>

Vico Ortiz in Our Flag Means Death

The head of government of Buenos Aires, Horacio Rodríguez Larreta, announced on Friday that he would ban the use of the inclusive Spanish language in schools in the Argentine capital, the Buenos Aires time reports.

The move drew an immediate backlash from proponents of inclusive language, which is currently widely used by schools and young people in the city. Among critics of Larreta’s decision is the non-binary actor and star of the HBO series Our flag means deathVic Ortiz.

Go to Twitter, Ortiz wrote an impassioned message addressed to the Argentine government.

“The Argentine government has succeeded [illegal] use or educate about inclusive language in schools. I’m disappointed. By making an inclusive language in Spanish [illegal] they repeat the same vicious and violent circle of silencing our existence, my existence. By doing this [illegal], they leave a door open for anyone to feel they can ‘legally’ ignore who I am. I breathe. My heart is beating. I think. I feel. I EXIST. With this ‘law’ you have chosen, it is easier not to recognize my humanity,” they wrote. “Fasten your seat belts. Because my community and I… will never be forgotten.

At a press conference on Friday, Larreta – who is a likely presidential hopeful in the 2023 elections for the center-right opposition Juntos por el Cambio coalition – justified his decision to “simplify the way children learn”, due to poor results in recent tests in the fields of Spanish literature and language.

“Teachers must respect the rules of the Spanish language because children must master the language as it is,” Larreta said.

This means that using gender-inclusive language like “e” to mean using non-binary gender is no longer accepted, nor is “x” or “@” in writing, according to the minister of Education of the city, Soledad Acuña.

National Education Minister Jaime Perczyk pushed back on the move, saying: “There is a need to improve [levels] but [the way] is not to ban it. Instead, he called for “redoubled efforts so that children can learn in better conditions”, according to the Time.

Surely this won’t be the last we hear of this story, as proponents of an inclusive language will continue their campaign for a more inclusive language in the country – as will Ortiz, who tweeted a call to action .

“The Argentine government has chosen to prohibit the growth and expansion of the Spanish language rather than challenge its stagnant structure,” they wrote, adding, “It’s time to make some noise, okay? “

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[REPORT] Aerolíneas Argentinas lines and flights between Sao Paulo and Argentina https://gicarg.org/report-aerolineas-argentinas-lines-and-flights-between-sao-paulo-and-argentina/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 11:10:45 +0000 https://gicarg.org/report-aerolineas-argentinas-lines-and-flights-between-sao-paulo-and-argentina/ [REPORT] Aerolíneas Argentinas lines and flights between Sao Paulo and ArgentinaFor the winter season, Aerolíneas Argentinas will significantly increase its flights between Sao Paulo and Argentina. Currently, the company connects Guarulhos Airport to Aeroparque Jorge Newbery in Buenos Aires, with three daily frequencies. Aerolíneas Argentinas will offer five new routes between Sao Paulo and Argentine cities from July. Bariloche, Córdoba, El Calafate, Salta, San Martín […]]]> [REPORT] Aerolíneas Argentinas lines and flights between Sao Paulo and Argentina

For the winter season, Aerolíneas Argentinas will significantly increase its flights between Sao Paulo and Argentina. Currently, the company connects Guarulhos Airport to Aeroparque Jorge Newbery in Buenos Aires, with three daily frequencies.

Aerolíneas Argentinas will offer five new routes between Sao Paulo and Argentine cities from July. Bariloche, Córdoba, El Calafate, Salta, San Martín de los Andes, Tucumán and Ushuaia will be the new connections.

Currently, all of these operations will be available during the winter. From mid-September, Aerolíneas Argentinas will offer services to Sao Paulo only in Buenos Aires.

See also: Aerolíneas Argentinas resumes flights to Rome.

Timetables between Sao Paulo and Argentina – Aerolíneas Argentinas

– Advertising –

Clarification: El Calafate, San Martin de los Andes, Tucuman and Ushuaia will have a stopover before arrival. In addition, part of the services to and from Bariloche will stop at Ezeiza.

To see all the tables, place the mobile phone in a horizontal position

From to Plane Freq. July Freq. August Freq. September
Bariloche (BRC) Boeing 737 seven seven seven
Buenos Aires (AEP) Boeing 737 30 30 30
Buenos Aires (EZE) Boeing 737 seven seven seven
Cordoba (COR) Boeing 737 2 2 2
El Calafate (ETP) Boeing 737 2 2 2
Salta (ALS) Boeing 737 3 3 3
San Martin de los Andes (PCC) Boeing 737 2 2 2
Tucuman (TUC) Boeing 737 2 2 2
Ushuaia (USH) Boeing 737 2 2 2

Stopovers

  • Bariloche (BRC): of the 7 weekly flights, 3 will stop at Ezeiza
  • El Calafate (ETP): Cordoba
  • San Martin de los Andes (CPC): Ezeiza
  • Tucuman (TUC): Salta
  • Ushuaia (USH): Ezeiza

First flight of each route

  • Bariloche (BRC): The 4th of July
  • Buenos Aires (EZE): The 4th of July
  • Cordoba (COR): The 4th of July
  • El Calafate (ETP): The 4th of July
  • Salta (ALS): The 4th of July
  • San Martin de los Andes (CPC): July the 5th
  • Tucuman (TUC): The 4th of July
  • Ushuaia (USH): July 3

Last flight of each route

  • Bariloche (BRC): September 18
  • Buenos Aires (EZE): September 18
  • Cordoba (COR): September 16
  • El Calafate (ETP): September 16
  • Salta (ALS): September 17
  • San Martin de los Andes (CPC): September 17
  • Tucuman (TUC): September 17
  • Ushuaia (USH): September 16

Aerolíneas Argentinas will be the company with the most flights, connections and seats offered between Argentina and Brazil during the winter season.

See also: Aerolíneas Argentinas made a special flight to Los Angeles.

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Buenos Aires Weather | Closest in blood, closest in blood https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-closest-in-blood-closest-in-blood/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 02:06:45 +0000 https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-closest-in-blood-closest-in-blood/ No less than 12 of the 20 Frente de Todos ministers who were sworn in 30 months ago yesterday are now gone and yet none of these twelve changes make the wheels seem to have deteriorated more than the loud expulsion of the weekend -end of the Minister of Productive Development Matías Kulfas. The infighting […]]]>

No less than 12 of the 20 Frente de Todos ministers who were sworn in 30 months ago yesterday are now gone and yet none of these twelve changes make the wheels seem to have deteriorated more than the loud expulsion of the weekend -end of the Minister of Productive Development Matías Kulfas. The infighting takes on new dimensions when the two wings of the ruling coalition accuse each other of the same crime – namely favoring the multinational Techint for the metal casing of the Néstor Kirchner gas pipeline after previously overlapping approvals due to much of the lack of other options.

The political nature of this dispute over the pipeline tender was evident from the outset due to the gross technical ignorance displayed by both sides – confusion between millimeters and inches, tube diameters and metal thickness, but this column will not expand this in order to avoid further errors. The May 30 resignation of pipeline project manager Antonio Prosnato over the hopelessly tangled bidding process marked the end of all technical criteria as politics completely took over.

Vice President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner wasted no time stepping into this vacuum for an outburst of “national and popular” rhetoric against the power in place (which never includes her), criticizing the government in general and Kulfas in particular for not pressuring Techint to return the favor of winning that tender by manufacturing the metal tubes here rather than in Brazil – as if any sane businessman would invest in building an entire plant to produce some $200 million worth of tubing with no clear prospect of anything beyond that. For some reason, Kulfas deviated from President Alberto Fernández’s (and his successor, Ambassador to Brazil and losing 2015 Peronist presidential candidate Daniel Scioli) usual scenario of turning the other cheek to such blows, pointing out that the tender had been led in Techint’s way by energy officials who were vice-presidential loyalists of La Cámpora origin. This criticism and the accompanying suspicions of corruption are both valid enough, even if they are also littered with technical errors, but his clumsy way of making the point (in a very confidential way) allowed President Fernández to yield more easily to vice-presidential pressure.

Kulfas is a dead duck, but with both sides of the ruling coalition pressing corruption charges, Federal Judge Daniel Rafecas (despite being the presidential nominee for Attorney General) has no other choice. than taking up the case with the ex-minister as a star witness. Cristina Fernández de Kirchner won the day, but what about the aftermath? What was she trying to accomplish? The suspicions of corruption are clearly based on sabotaging Techint’s tender in order to sneak into crony capitalism, of which a “national bourgeoisie” is its preferred synonym. But could it be that she’s trying to sabotage the deal (while torpedoing big business’ tentative presidential approaches) as an end in itself because, convinced of an inevitable defeat next year, she doesn’t want the next government is reaping the benefits of the pipeline?

If so, it takes the subordination of economics and everything else to politics to extremes with the supreme absurdity of this country having to spend billions of scarce dollars to import fuel when it has the second largest shale gas reserves in the world at Vaca Muerta which cannot be transported for lack of a pipeline that has become a political football – diesel shortages now crippling agricultural production are the most immediate expression of this madness with populist pricing for the culprit. Dollar scarcity is another absurdity with record exports, a trade surplus and all major debt payments deferred. There are no easy exchange rate options against this – a devaluation would only trigger runaway inflation as an overvalued currency stimulates demand and defends growth while supply dries up for lack of dollars and therefore inputs.

There isn’t much space left for the memory lane segment of this column to connect past and present. If there have already been a dozen ministerial changes in this government, there have been dozens in the 34 years of my Herald of Buenos Aires drafting experience from 1983. Any comparison with Kulfas should limit the scope to the economic sphere, but even here there were 27 ministers in those 34 years with the inherent instability of a volatile economy. Most of the changes were almost routine and few marked a change of direction – the exit of Bernardo Grinspun in 1985 marked the end of the heterodox economy of the democratic spring, the arrival of Antonio Erman González at the end of 1989 meant that Carlos Menem traded his corporate alliance for a fiscal rather than an economic focus and Ricardo López Murphy in 2001 made the ultra-Orthodox economy reign supreme for a fortnight. The real shocks to the system were the departures of two very successful ministers – Domingo Cavallo in mid-1996 and Roberto Lavagna in late 2005 – but these were motivated by political jealousy rather than a change of economic direction (which is why Cavallo was replaced by the very orthodox Roque Fernández, co-author of Convertibility, and Lavagna by a series of Kirchnerian courtiers). Thus, no economic policy in Argentina seems as dangerous as its total subordination to politics – this is what happened with Kulfas.

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David Buenos Aires appeals for criminal assistance to help HSBC fight identity fraud https://gicarg.org/david-buenos-aires-appeals-for-criminal-assistance-to-help-hsbc-fight-identity-fraud/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 07:25:43 +0000 https://gicarg.org/david-buenos-aires-appeals-for-criminal-assistance-to-help-hsbc-fight-identity-fraud/ HSBC, the bank described as “too big to jail” over money laundering allegations in Mexico, is also not avoiding potential controversy in its marketing and is coming back with a David Buenos Aires cracker. “Dear Customer” discusses the dangers of identity theft, a significant and increasingly costly problem for banks as well as customers. In […]]]>

HSBC, the bank described as “too big to jail” over money laundering allegations in Mexico, is also not avoiding potential controversy in its marketing and is coming back with a David Buenos Aires cracker. “Dear Customer” discusses the dangers of identity theft, a significant and increasingly costly problem for banks as well as customers. In the rather unlikely setting of a bank robbery.

The modus operandi of a virtual scam is recreated with bank robber cybercriminals demanding personal data and passwords. And the confused customers accompany him.

Produced by Argentina Cine, directed by Augusto Gimenez Zapiola and Alejandro Rey.

Julia Lois, HSBC Marketing Manager at HSBC, added: “We believe we should all be making a contribution to the community in terms of raising awareness and at HSBC we strongly believe that this contribution will empower many more customers in the financial system to have more tools to avoid being victims of cybercrime.

“Across all of our platforms and service centers, we have information and procedures to guide customers through risky situations, and our latest campaign aims to highlight the importance of proceeding appropriately in the face of these threats.”

To the point, compelling and, rather surprisingly, funny too.

A British or American bank marketer would be a mile away from such treatment.

MAA creative scale: 9.

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Buenos Aires Weather | Business between the United States and Venezuela resumes despite punitive sanctions https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-business-between-the-united-states-and-venezuela-resumes-despite-punitive-sanctions/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 15:35:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/buenos-aires-weather-business-between-the-united-states-and-venezuela-resumes-despite-punitive-sanctions/ Venezuelan imports of U.S. food and agricultural products are on the rise, with the private sector driving increased business between the two former partners despite punitive sanctions imposed on Caracas by Washington. “Venezuela disappeared from the world of imports and exports for a while, but it is coming back,” Luis Vicente García, director general of […]]]>

Venezuelan imports of U.S. food and agricultural products are on the rise, with the private sector driving increased business between the two former partners despite punitive sanctions imposed on Caracas by Washington.

“Venezuela disappeared from the world of imports and exports for a while, but it is coming back,” Luis Vicente García, director general of the Venezuelan-American Chamber of Commerce (VENANCHAM), told AFP.

“We are at a turning point,” García said.

Total imports of food and agricultural products into Venezuela amounted to US$2.4 billion in 2021, an increase of 31.2% compared to 2020.

The oil-rich but cash-strapped South American country is now enjoying sluggish growth after a years-long recession in which its gross domestic product shrank by 80%.

Purchases from the United States reached US$634 million in 2021, second only to US$934 million spent in Brazil, according to a report from the US Department of Agriculture, which said opportunities in Venezuela were improving .

Although the US figure represents a 45% increase over the previous year, it is still far from the US$1.4 billion per year seen between 2010 and 2014. In 2017, at the height of US-Venezuelan tensions , US imports were only worth US$400 million.

The main purchases are cereals, pasta, canned fruits and vegetables, alcoholic beverages and animal feed.

Imports are crucial for Venezuela, which produces only 50% of its basic corn needs and 45% of its rice needs, according to the agricultural producers’ union Fedeagro.

According to VENAMCHAM, trade between Venezuela and the United States was worth about $38 billion in 2008, at a time when Washington was Caracas’ biggest crude oil customer.

Softening commands

That figure fell to just under $2 billion in 2021, but rose nearly 28% in the first quarter of 2022 from a year earlier.

At the height of Venezuela’s economic crisis, President Nicolás Maduro’s government blamed the scarcity of basic necessities such as food, which was causing endless queues at supermarkets, on the US “blockade”.

Between 2017 and 2018, sanctions were taken against individuals, freezing bank accounts and barring American companies and citizens from doing business with dozens of Venezuelan state officials.

The United States failed to recognize Maduro’s re-election in 2018 in a vote boycotted by the opposition. The previous year, Washington had imposed a series of sanctions against its government, including an oil embargo, in response to the crackdown on protesters.

“When the sanctions came…there was a reaction [by businesses]: I will not participate in this market,” García said.

Even though medicine and food were exempt, fear of reprisals was an obstacle.

But faced with a cash flow problem, the government, which almost monopolized food imports, opened the doors to the private sector.

It was “about two or three years ago that the government started letting private companies import,” García said.

Venezuelan food imports have also benefited since 2018 from the lifting of customs duties.

The easing of tight foreign exchange controls has also helped, as have remittances worth an estimated US$2.5-3 billion a year.

There have also been movements on the political front.

On May 17, US President Joe Biden eased some sanctions to help talks between Maduro and the opposition, suspended in October.

by Esteban Rojas, AFP

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Housing for the Olympic Village Buenos Aires 2018 / Alonso&Crippa + Ariel Jinchuk + Lucas Grande + Pedro Yañez https://gicarg.org/housing-for-the-olympic-village-buenos-aires-2018-alonsocrippa-ariel-jinchuk-lucas-grande-pedro-yanez/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://gicarg.org/housing-for-the-olympic-village-buenos-aires-2018-alonsocrippa-ariel-jinchuk-lucas-grande-pedro-yanez/ Housing for the Olympic Village Buenos Aires 2018 / Alonso&Crippa + Ariel Jinchuk + Lucas Grande + Pedro Yañez © Javier Agustin Rojas + 28 To share To share Facebook Twitter Mail pinterest WhatsApp Or https://www.archdaily.com/965443/housing-for-the-olympic-village-buenos-aires-2018-alonso-and-crippa-plus-ariel-jinchuk-plus-lucas-grande-plus-pedro- yanez © Javier Agustin Rojas Text description provided by the architects. The proposal is developed in Villa Soldati, an […]]]>

Housing for the Olympic Village Buenos Aires 2018 / Alonso&Crippa + Ariel Jinchuk + Lucas Grande + Pedro Yañez

© Javier Agustin Rojas

© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas+ 28